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About the Subcommittees Three subcommittees, the Subcommittee on Environmental Quality and Natural Resources, the Subcommittee on Food and Health, and the Subcommittee on Economic and Social Development in a Global Context, generated white papers that provided input into the synthesis committee's final report. Members of the subcommittees also were extremely helpful in providing the synthesis com- mittee with other data and written materials throughout the study. Although sections of the white papers and other materials authored by sub- committee members were used in the preparation of this report, the report as a whole represents a consensus of the synthesis committee only. Subcommittee on Environmental Quality and Natural Resources G. Philip Robertson, W.K. Kellogg Biological Station, Michigan State University, Hickory Corner, MI, Chair Dr. Robertson has been a professor of crop and soil sciences at Michigan State University since 1985 and director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Long-Term Ecological Research Program in Agricultural Ecology at the W.K. Kellogg Biological Station since 1988. His research interests include nitrogen biogeochemistry and in particular nitrogen conservation in field-crop ecosystems, biogenic sources of atmospheric trace-gas fluxes, and the functional significance of soil microbial diversity. Dr. Robertson has been a postdoctoral fellow at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (1980-1981) and a sabbatical scholar at Cooperative Research Centres in Adelaide (1993-1994) and Brisbane (2001-2002), Australia. His service includes memberships on various grant panels 225

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226 ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES at the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and NSF and directorship of the USDA Fund for Rural America Environment Program in 1997-1998. Dr. Robertson also served on the National Research Council Committee on an Evaluation of the US Department of Agriculture National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program (1998-19991. He received a BA from Hampshire College and a PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology from Indiana University. Janet C. Broome, Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program, University of California, Davis, CA Dr. Broome is the associate director of the University of California's state- wide Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (UC SAREP) based in Davis. She works with the director to provide leadership and adminis- trative support for the first sustainable-agriculture program at a land-grant uni- versity. She leads the agricultural-chemical use-risk reduction program and the Biologically Integrated Farming Systems (BIFS) competitive-grants program, and she is the lead scientist for a $1 million grants program for the development of alternatives to methyl bromide. She conducts research in ecologically based pest management, working in weather-driven disease-forecasting models. In addition, working with the UC integrated pest management project, she developed a plant- disease model database for the PestCast statewide weather-monitoring and disease-forecasting network. Dr. Broome served as an environmental research scientist for the California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Pesticide Regulation in 1994-1997. She has provided expert testimony to the California state legislature on the implementation of the Food Quality Protection Act. Dr. Broome has broad expertise in ecology, epidemiology and control of fungal plant pathogens, sustainable viticulture, integrated farming systems, and ecologic pest management. She also has extensive understanding of pesticide- related regulatory issues. Dr. Broome received a BA in biologic sciences from Swarthmore College and a PhD in plant pathology from the University of Cali- fornia, Davis. Elizabeth Chornesky, The Nature Conservancy, Santa Cruz, CAT See About the Authors. Jane Frankenberger, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Dr. Frankenberger is associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at Purdue University. She leads statewide extension * Synthesis Committee member.

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ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES 227 and research programs in soil and water engineering, watershed assessment and management, geographic information systems, agricultural drainage, wellhead protection, and watershed modeling. Dr. Frankenberger has also worked in inter- national development in Senegal (1984-1990) and the Democratic Republic of Congo (1979-1982~. Dr. Frankenberger received a BA in physics from St. Olaf College, an MS in agricultural engineering from the University of Minnesota, and a PhD in agricultural and biologic engineering from Cornell University. Paul Johnson, Oneota Slopes Farm, Decorah, IA Dr. Johnson and his family have owned and operated Oneota Slopes Farm near Decorah, IA, since 1974. Their operation has involved dairy, corn, soy- beans, hay, beef cattle, sheep, and Christmas trees. Dr. Johnson served three terms in the Iowa State Legislature, 1984-1990, and was chief of the Soil Conser- vation Service (now the Natural Resources Conservation Service, NRCS) at the US Department of Agriculture from 1993 to 1997. He served as the director of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources from 1999 to 2000. Dr. Johnson received a BS and an MS in forestry from the University of Michigan and con- ducted doctoral research in tropical-forest ecology in Costa Rica. He holds an honorary doctorate from Luther College in Decorah, IA. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Ghana from 1962 to 1964. Dr. Johnson served two terms on the National Research Council Board on Agriculture (1988-1993), where he re- viewed the National Research Council report on alternative agriculture and took part in the development of the National Research Initiative Competitive Grants Program. He served as an ex officio member of the Committee on Long Range Soil and Water Conservation Policy in 1990-1993 and helped to implement many of its recommendations while chief of NRCS. Mark Lipson, Organic Farming Research Center, Santa Cruz, CA Mr. Lipson is policy program director for the Organic Farming Research Foundation. Since 1983, he has been a partner of Molino Creek Farm, a 25-acre diversified wholesale organic-vegetable operation. He served as assistant executive director for California Certified Organic Farmers from 1985 to 1992. Mr. Lipson serves on the US Department of Agriculture Advisory Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology and the Public Advisory Committee for the Univer- sity of California Sustainable Agriculture Research Education Program. He has participated in a discussion panel for the National Academy of Sciences work- shop on ecologic monitoring of genetically modified crops. Mr. Lipson's 1997 publication, Searching for the O-word, analyzes the USDA Current Research Information System for pertinence to organic farming. Mr. Lipson holds a BA in environmental studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz.

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228 John Miranowski, Iowa State University, Ames, IA ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Dr. Miranowski is a professor in the Department of Economics at Iowa State University. He served as chair of the department in 1995-2000. Dr. Miranowski has expertise in soil conservation, natural-resource management, water quality, land management, energy, global change, and agricultural research decision- making. He has previously served as director of the Resources and Technology Division of the USDA Economic Research Service (1984-19941; executive coor- dinator of the secretary of agriculture's Policy Coordination Council and special assistant to the deputy secretary of agriculture (1990-1991~; and Gilbert F. White fellow at Resources for the Future (1981-19821. Dr. Miranowski headed the US delegation to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Joint Working Party on Agriculture and the Environment (1993-19951. He has served as a member of the Ad Hoc Working Group on Risk Assessment of Federal Coor- dinating Committee on Science, Education, and Technology (1990-19921; direc- tor of the Executive Board of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (1989-19921; and director of the Executive Board of the American Agricultural Economics Association (1987-19901. Dr. Miranowski served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Impact of Emerging Agricultural Trends on Fish and Wildlife Habitat. He received a BS in agricul- tural business from Iowa State University and an MA and PhD in economics from Harvard University. James Moseley, US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC James Moseley is owner and managing partner of Infinity Pork and AgRidge Farms in Clarks Hill, Indiana. During his 32 years in farming, he has been involved in numerous public-service activities. He served as the agricultural advisor to Administrator William Reilly of the US Environmental Protection Agency from 1989 to 1990. He was assistant secretary of agriculture from 1990 to 1992. As head of the US Department of Agriculture's Soil Conservation Service and Forest Service, he was lead negotiator on issues involving endan- gered species, including the highly controversial spotted owl; wetlands; livestock grazing on public lands; and policy issues related to the conservation title of the 1990 farm bill. Mr. Moseley returned to farming in 1992 and was director of agricultural services and regulations for the state of Indiana at Purdue University from 1993 to 1995. Mr. Moseley served on the National Research Council Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources from 1992 to 1995. His farm operation includes 2,800 acres of no-till corn and soybeans and 50,000 hogs. Mr. Moseley's management portfolio includes a waste-treatment plant for separating and com- posting waste solids, chisel plowing, and construction of wildlife habitat through collaboration with Pheasants Forever. He is active in an initiative called Food, Land and People, an educational program about resources and the environment.

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ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES 229 Mr. Moseley holds a BS in horticulture from Purdue University (1973~. He resigned from the committee in April 2001 to become deputy secretary of the US Department of Agriculture. Elizabeth Owens, Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO Dr. Owens is North American co-lead for scientific affairs at the Monsanto Company. Previously, she was team lead and manager of regulatory affairs in biotechnology for potato and specialty crops. She is a recognized expert in pesti- cide and biotechnology regulations. Dr. Owens's previous positions include manager of government affairs (1995-1998) and manager of product registra- tions (1991-1995) at ISK Biosciences Corporation, manager of regulatory affairs and commercial development at BioTechnica International, Inc. (1986-1991), and Program Leader and senior scientist at GTE Laboratories (1980-1986~. Dr. Owens received a BS in food science and chemistry from the University of Idaho, an MS in entomology from Iowa State University, and a PhD in entomol- ogy with an integrated pest management specialization from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. David Pimentel, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY See About the Authors. Lori Ann Thrupp, US Environmental Protection Agency, San Francisco, CA Dr. Thrupp has broad expertise in sustainable agriculture, food and environ- mental policy, natural-resource management, sustainable enterprise and green marketing, pesticides and pest management, and agricultural biodiversity. She is currently a life scientist at the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9, in the Agriculture Initiative, which entails education, collaboration, and support to the agriculture industry, farmer and nonprofit organizations, and universities on agriculture-environment issues. In 1990-1999, she served as director of sustain- able agriculture at the World Resources Institute, where she coordinated and administered international sustainable-agriculture projects. She has served on the faculty for the Organization of Tropical Studies in Costa Rica and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Thrupp holds a BA from Stanford University and was a Marshall and Fulbright scholar at Sussex University, UK, when she received her MS and PhD in development studies, focused on agricultural development. * Synthesis Committee member.

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230 ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Subcommittee on Economic and Social Development in a Global Context Ray A. Goldberg, Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, Chair Dr. Goldberg is George Moffett professor of agriculture and business, emeritus, at the Harvard Business School. His expertise is in domestic and inter- national agribusiness management. With John H. Davis, he developed the Agribusiness Program at Harvard Business School in 1955. From 1970 to 1997, he was the George Moffett professor of agriculture and business and head of the Agribusiness Program. As emeritus professor, he has chaired the Agribusiness Senior Management Seminars at Harvard Business School and teaches a course on agribusiness and food policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Goldberg's recent publications involve developing strategies for private, public, and cooperative managers as they position their firms, institutions, and government agencies in a rapidly changing global food system. He is also con- ducting research on the major biologic, logistic, packaging, and information revo- lutions that affect global agribusiness managers as they attempt to cope with the volatile restructuring of major commodity systems. Dr. Goldberg is one of the founders and the first president of the International Agribusiness Management Association and an adviser and consultant to numerous government agencies and private firms. Dr. Goldberg received an AB from Harvard, an MBA from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, and a PhD in agricultural economics from the University of Minnesota. Julian Alston, University of California, Davis, CA Dr. Alston is a professor of agricultural and resources economics at the Uni- versity of California, Davis. His expertise is in agricultural R&D and agricultural research policy. Specifically, Dr. Alston is interested in economics of agricul- tural markets and policy, agricultural sciences and technology, and international agricultural economics. Before joining the University of California, he was an agricultural economist in the Department of Agriculture in Victoria, Australia. Dr. Alston was awarded a fellowship with the American Agricultural Economics Association in 2000. Other awards he has received include outstanding published research in agricultural economics from the Western Agricultural Economics Association (1991, 1995), best article in the Review of Marketing and Agricul- tural Economics from the Australian Agricultural Economics Society (1993), and outstanding American Journal of Agricultural Economics article (1987~. He is on the Editorial Board of Agribusiness: An International Journal and the Austra- lian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics. He has also been an associate editor of the American Journal of Agricultural Economics. Dr. Alston received a BAgrSci from the University of Melbourne, an MAgrSci in agricul-

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ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES 231 tural economics from La Trobe University, and a PhD in economics from North Carolina State University. Christine Bruhn, University of California, Davis, CA Dr. Bruhn is consumer food marketing specialist at the University of Califor- nia Cooperative Extension in Davis. She studies consumer concerns about food safety and quality, investigates consumer response to new technologies or ingre- dients, identifies factors that influence consumer food choice, investigates diffi- culties that the food industry may have in fulfilling consumer expectations, and develops appropriate educational programs. Under the auspices of the Institute of Food Technologists, Dr. Bruhn is regional food science communicator and a member of the Food Council Advisory Committee, the Biotechnology Issues Task Force, and the Science, Communication, and Government Relations Committee. She is also chair-designate of the Dairy, Food, and Environmental Sanitation Journal Management Committee at the International Association for Food Pro- tection. Dr. Bruhn received a BS and an MS in home economics and a PhD in consumer behavior from the University of California, Davis. Lawrence Busch, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI Dr. Busch is University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Soci- ology and director of the Institute for Food and Agricultural Standards at Michigan State University, East Lansing. His expertise includes development sociology, economic development and planning, agricultural research policy, and democratic governance. From 1988 to 1989, he was research director at the French Institute of Scientific Research for Development and Cooperation in Paris. He has served on Experiment Station Committee on Organization and Policy T5, the social- science coordinating committee for the experiment stations; the scientific advi- sory board for the International Center for Agronomic Research, the French agronomic-aid agency; and the review committee for the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA), the Brazilian equivalent of the US Depart- ment of Agriculture Research, Education, and Economics mission area. Cur- rently, Dr. Busch serves as the US Agency for International Development scien- tific liaison officer to International Service for National Agricultural Research. His recent publications include From Columbus to Conagra: The Globalization of Agriculture; The Agricultural Scientific Enterprise, a System in Transition; and "Inquiry of the Public Good: Citizen Participation in Agricultural Research." He received a BA in history from Hofstra University in Hempstead, NY, and an MS and PhD in development sociology from Cornell University.

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232 Pierre Crosson, Resources for the Future, Washington, DC ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Dr. Crosson is a senior fellow and resident consultant in the Energy and Natural Resources Division of Resources for the Future, where he analyzes agri- culture and related issues of sustainability and climate-change impacts. His expertise is in agricultural, environmental, and natural-resources policy and analy- sis. Recent publications include An Income and Product Account Perspective on the Sustainability of US Agriculture, Concerns for Stability: Integration of Natural Resource and Environmental Issues in the Research Agendas of NARS, "Future Supplies of Land and Water for World Agriculture," "Demand and Supply: Trends in Global Agriculture," and "Natural Resource and Environmental Accounting in U.S. Agriculture." Dr. Crosson has served on the National Research Council Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change (1989-1991) and the National Research Council Panel for Collaborative Research Support for the US Agency for International Development's Sustainable Agricul- ture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) Program. He has also served as a member of the National Rural Studies Committee and of a task force of the Council on Agricultural Science and Technology on Preparing the US Agricul- ture for Global Climate Change and as secretary of the Association of Environ- mental and Resource Economists. Awards that Dr. Crosson has received include the Distinguished Service Award of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists and resident of the Rockefeller Foundation Study and Con- ference Center (Bellagio, Italy). Dr. Crosson received a BA from the University of Texas and a PhD in economics from Columbia University. Brian Halweil, Worldwatch Institute, Washington, DC Mr. Halweil is a research associate at the Worldwatch Institute. His expertise is in food and agriculture, from organic farming to biotechnology and from hunger to water scarcity. Mr. Halweil began at the institute in 1997 as the John Gardner Public Service Fellow from Stanford University. He has written editorials and articles for WorldWatch magazine. He has contributed to The State of the World and Vital Signs. He was a coauthor of the Environmental Alert book Beyond Malthus: 19 Dimensions of the Population Problem and the Worldwatch paper "Underfed and Overfed: The Global Epidemic of Malnutrition." He has traveled extensively in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean, learning indigenous farming techniques and promoting sustainable food production. In Mexico and Cuba, he helped to promote biointensive farming as a means to improve house- hold food security and household income in rural areas. Mr. Halweil received a BS in earth systems and biology from Stanford and has completed research, field- work, and coursework at the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at the University of California, Davis.

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ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Fred Harrison, ,Ir., Fort Valley State University, Fort Valley, GA 233 Dr. Harrison is currently administrator and director of the Cooperative Exten- sion Program and interim dean of the College of Agriculture, Home Economics, and Allied Programs at Fort Valley State University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1982. Earlier, he was an assistant professor of extension education in the University of Georgia's College of Agriculture and a personnel and staff-development specialist for the University of Georgia's Cooperative Extension Service. Dr. Harrison has experience in extension and educational out- reach at the county, state, national, and international levels and in the develop- ment of effective extension; and he has thorough knowledge of higher education and academic enterprise in the 1862 and 1890 land-grant systems. Dr. Harrison has been a member of the National Research Council Committee on Land-Grant Colleges of Agriculture (1993-1997) and the National Association of State Uni- versity and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC) and chairman-elect (1992-1993) and chairman (1993-1994) of the Extension Committee on Organization and Policy (ECOP-National). Dr. Harrison received a BS in agricultural education from Fort Valley State College, an MEd in agricultural education from the Uni- versity of Georgia, and a PhD in agricultural education/extension from Ohio State University. Carol Keiser, C-BAR Cattle Company, Inc., Carlinville, IL Ms. Keiser has since 1985 been president of C-BAR Cattle Company, Inc., where she established and currently manages operations in feeding 3,000 cattle in custom feedlots in Texas, Kansas, Nebraska, and Northern Illinois. Ms. Keiser has experience in production agriculture and agribusiness administration. She coordinates business operations of C-BAR Cattle Co. and Lovless Feedlot with locations outside Illinois and Kansas. Since 1990, Ms. Keiser has also been presi- dent of C-ARC Enterprises, Inc., where she operates and manages Central Forage Systems, a forage marketing service for custom operators, trucking companies, and dairy and beef customers. She has expertise in agribusiness administration, policy development, research analysis, and market development. From 1997 to 1999, Ms. Keiser served as a member of the Strategic Planning Task Force on US Department of Agriculture Research Facilities. She is on the boards of directors of the Council on Food and Agricultural Research (C-FAR), the Illinois Beef Association, and Agricultural Future of America; and she was a member of the Agricultural Advisory Council for the College of Agricultural, Consumer, and Environmental Sciences and the External Advisory Council for the Department of Animal Science, University of Illinois. Ms. Keiser received a BS in agricul- ture from the University of Illinois and a BS in education from Greenville College.

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234 Terry L. Roe, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Dr. Roe is professor of applied economics and director of the Center for Political Economy and co-director of the Economic Development Center at the University of Minnesota. His research focuses on economic growth, develop- ment, and trade. Currently funded projects include effects of agricultural trade reform on developing countries and a World Bank project on water policy for long-run growth in water-scarce developing countries. His recent publications include "Growth, Lobbying and Public Goods" and "A Global Analysis of Agri- cultural Reform in WTO Member Countries." Dr. Roe received a PhD in agricul- tural economics from Purdue University, and he was a visiting fellow at Yale University's Economic Growth Center in the academic year 1984-1985. Laurian ,1. Unnevehr, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, ILL See About the Authors. Subcommittee on Food and Health Susan Harlander, Consultant, St. Paul, MN, Chair Dr. Harlander's expertise is in food-science research and development. Dr. Harlander recently formed a consulting company on food and agricultural biotechnology. She had held the position of vice president of biotechnology development and Green Giant agricultural research at the Pillsbury Company. She has also been director of dairy foods R&D at Land O' Lakes and served on the faculty in the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Harlander has extensive National Research Council experience, having served as a member of the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, the Committee on Food Chemicals Codex, the Committee on Opportunities in the Nutrition and Food Sciences, the Ford Foundation Minority Postdoctoral Review Panel on Biological Sciences, and the Panel on the Applications of Biotechnology to Traditional Fermented Foods. Dr. Harlander is a member of the US Depart- ment of Agriculture National Agricultural Research, Extension, Education, and Economics Advisory Board and the subcommittee that oversees the Agricultural Research Service's peer-review system. She is an active member of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and serves on the Foundation Board. She has previ- ously served on IFT's Executive Committee and Committee on Research and was an IFT scientific lecturer. Dr. Harlander received a BS in biology from the Uni- versity of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and an MS in microbiology and a PhD in food science from the University of Minnesota. * Synthesis Committee member.

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ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Lester M. Crawford, ,Ir., Center for Food and Nutrition Policy, Washington, DC 235 Dr. Crawford has been director of the Center for Food and Nutrition Policy at Georgetown University since 1997. He had been executive director of the Asso- ciation of American Veterinary Medical Colleges and he was executive vice- president of scientific affairs for the National Food Processors Association. He has also been administrator of the US Department of Agriculture Food Safety Inspection Service (1987-1991) and director of the Food and Drug Administra- tion Center for Veterinary Medicine (1982-1985~. Dr. Crawford was a member of the National Research Council Institute for Laboratory Animal Research (1989-1992) and has served as a National Research Council reviewer. He is on the editorial board of the Encyclopedia of Food, and of Microbial Drug Resis- tance, and is associate editor of Food Control. He is also vice president of the World Association of Veterinary Hygiene, a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Food Safety of the World Health Organization, and a member of the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Crawford has been a consultant to industry, academe, and law firms. Recent publications include Animal Drugs and Human Health, "Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy," and "Emerging Issues in Food Safety." Dr. Crawford received a DVM from Auburn University, a PhD in pharmacology from the University of Georgia and a DSc (Honoris Causa) from Budapest University. Joan R. Davenport, Washington State University, Presser, WA Dr. Davenport is associate professor and soil scientist at the Irrigated Agri- culture Research and Extension Center at Washington State University (WSU). She conducts research in nutrient management, soil fertility, and management of irrigated agricultural crops in central Washington, emphasizing site-specific man- agement, improved production, and environmental quality. She is also working on developing nondestructive crop-monitoring systems for early detection of nutrient and physiologic stresses in potato and grape and has had extensive experience in soil fertility and plant mineral nutrition. Before joining the WSU faculty in 1997, Dr. Davenport was manager of agricultural research at Ocean Spray Cranberries. She is an associate editor of HortTechnology and has served as secretary, vice chair, and chair of the Production and Management Section of the Potato Association of America and of the Mineral Nutrition Working Group of the American Society of Horticultural Science. Dr. Davenport' s recent publi- cations include "Using Site Specific Approaches to Advance Potato Management in Irrigated Systems," "Cultivar Influences Cranberry Response to Surface Sand- ing," and "Influences of Soil Iron and Cranberry Aerobic Status on Phosphorus Availability in Cranberry." Dr. Davenport received a BS in plant science from

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236 ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Rutgers University, an MS in soil management from Iowa State University, and a PhD in soil chemistry (1985) from the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Rebecca C. Doyle, Andrews, Doyle and Associates, Gillespie, IL Rebecca C. Doyle is a principal consultant at Andrews, Doyle and Associ- ates, a food-product, agriculture, and natural-resources consulting firm. She had been the first female director of agriculture in the Illinois Department of Agricul- ture and Governor Edgar's point person for international marketing, biotech- nology, and natural-resources protection. Ms. Doyle has been a board member of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture, the International Agri Management Association, the Farm Foundation/Bennett Roundtable, the World Affairs Council of Central Illinois, and Women Executives in State Government. She is a partner in Hickory Grove Pork Farm and corporate officer of Belpine, Inc. (a family farm corporation), participating in production agricul- ture since 1979. She has been named BIO's Government Executive of the Year (1997) and Progressive Farmer Magazine's Agriculture Person of the Year (1998~. Ms. Doyle received a BS in agriculture communications (1975) and an MS in extension education (1977) from the University of Illinois College of Agri- culture. She resigned from the committee in July 2001. Donald N. Duvick, Affiliate Professor, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Dr. Duvick was employed from 1951 to 1990 by Pioneer Hi-Bred Inter- national, Inc., successively as corn breeder and geneticist, coordinator of corn breeding, director of corn breeding, director of plant breeding, vice president of research and senior vice president of research. After retirement from Pioneer Hi- Bred, he was appointed an off-campus affiliate professor in the Department of Agronomy at Iowa State University. Dr. Duvick's research contributions over the last 50 years have been his comprehensive studies of cytoplasmic male sterility in maize, his demonstrating the relative contribution of genetics to yield gains of hybrid maize, his documenting the role of genetic diversity in plant breeding, and his proving that high-yielding hybrids have low genotype x environmental inter- actions. Dr. Duvick has been a member of the National Research Council Committee on Pakistan-BOSTID Agricultural Research Grants (1991-1995), the National Research Council Crop Vulnerability Work Group (1998-1993), the National Research Council Scientific Council to the Plant Gene Expression Center (1985-1993), and the National Research Council Subcommittee on Plants (1988- 1989~. He has also been a member of the Board of Directors of Genetic Resources Communications Systems and the boards of trustees of CIMMYT (the Inter- national Maize and Wheat Improvement Center) and the International Rice Research Institute. Dr. Duvick was elected to the National Academy of Sciences

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ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES 237 in 2002. Dr. Duvick received a BS in agriculture from the University of Illinois and a PhD in botany from Washington University, St. Louis. Joseph I. Ten, US Department of Agriculture, Research, Education, and Economics Mission Area, Washington, DC Joseph J. Jen is dean of the College of Agriculture of the California Poly- technic State University (CPSU) in San Louis Obispo. His research interests include postharvest handling of fruits and vegetables, pectin chemistry, and food enzymology. Before joining CPSU in 1992, Dr. Jen was chair of the Division of Food Science and Technology of the University of Georgia. He had worked for 6 years for Campbell Soup Company. Dr. Jen has worked as a consultant to the United Nations, US food companies, and foreign governments. He is on several boards of directors and executive committees of national and state agriculture- related organizations. He is a member of the California State Board of Food and Agriculture. Dr. Jen received a BS in agricultural chemistry from National Taiwan University, an MS in food science from Washington State University, and a PhD in comparative biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. He also received an MBA from Southern Illinois University. Dr. Jen resigned from the committee to become undersecretary of the US Department of Agriculture's Research, Education, and Economics Mission Area. John B. Kaneene, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI Dr. Kaneene is professor of epidemiology and director of the Population Medicine Center at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State Uni- versity. His research interests include molecular epidemiology of emerging and re-emerging enteric zoonotic diseases, epidemiology of antibiotic resistance in animal and human populations, risk-assessment modeling as related to foodborne pathogens, and epidemiology and prevention of drug residues in foods. Dr. Kaneene served on the National Research Council Subcommittee on Drug Use in Food Animals. He received a BS in mathematics (1968) and a DVM from the University of Khartoum in Sudan. He received an MPH and a PhD in epide- miology from the University of Minnesota. Larry Kuzminski, Duxbury, MAT See About the Authors. * Synthesis Committee member.

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238 ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Arno G. Motulsky, Professor Emeritus, University of Washington, Seattle, WA Dr. Motulsky is professor (emeritus-active) of medicine and genome sci- ences at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is considered a founder of the field of pharmacogenetics. His recent research focuses on human and medical genetics, the role of polymorphisms and mutations associated with disease sus- ceptibilities, and molecular genetics of color vision. Dr. Motulsky has held numerous editorial positions, including positions with the American Journal of Human Genetics and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. He has served on the World Health Organization Expert Advisory Panel on Human Genetics and on various National Academy of Sciences (NAS) committees, including service as chair of the Committee on Diet and Health. He is on the NAS Temporary Nominating Group for Clinical and Epidemiological Sciences. He is a member of NAS and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Motulsky received his BS and MD from the University of Illinois. David L. Pelletier, Associate Professor, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Dr. Pelletier is associate professor of nutrition policy in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University. His research, teaching, and outreach focus on the interaction of science, politics, and public values in the formation of food and nutrition policy. His research interests include agricultural biotech- nology, dietary supplements and local food systems in the United States, and iron fortification, malnutrition, and child mortality in developing countries. He received a BS in biology and a BA in anthropology from the University of Arizona and an MA in anthropology and a PhD in anthropology with a nutrition minor from Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Pelletier has served on a variety of national and international advisory bodies for the US Department of Agriculture, the US Agency for International Development, the World Health Organization, the World Bank, UNICEF, and the International Food Policy Research Institute. Jean A.T. Pennington, Research Nutritionist, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Dr. Pennington is a research nutritionist in the Division of Nutrition Research Coordination at the National Institutes of Health. She had served in various posi- tions in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition of the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Pennington has expertise in nutrition, physiology, dietary surveillance, and food-composition databases. She has served as temporary adviser to the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives and as president of the Society for Nutrition Education. Dr. Pennington received her BA in Physiology and her PhD in nutrition from the University of California, Berkeley.

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ABOUT THE SUBCOMMITTEES Max Rothschild, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 239 Dr. Rothschild is a distinguished professor of animal science at Iowa State University. His research has centered on genetic control of growth, reproduction, and health in swine, and identification of genes associated with economic traits in farm animals. Awards that Dr. Rothschild has recently received include the C.F. Curtiss Distinguished Professor in Agriculture (1999), American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow (1998), US Department of Agriculture Honor Team Award (1997), and American Society of Animal Science Animal Breeding and Genetics Award (1995~. Dr. Rothschild serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Animal Biotechnology, the Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics, AgBio News and Information, and the Journal of Agriculture Genomics. He serves as the coordinator of the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service National Swine Genome Project, which spans a number of institutions. He is also a member of the Program Advisory Board for Agricultural Biotechnology of CAB International. Dr. Rothschild received a BS in animal science from the University of California, Davis, an MS in animal science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a PhD in animal breed- ing (with minors in genetics and statistics) from Cornell University. Andrew Schmitz, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Dr. Schmitz is Ben Hill Griffin eminent scholar and professor of food and resource economics at the University of Florida, research professor at the Univer- sity of California, Berkeley, and adjunct professor of the University of Saskatchewan. His teaching and research interests include international trade, marketing, cost-benefit analysis, and antitrust economics. He has been a consult- ant to many organizations, including legal firms in California, Iowa, the District of Columbia, and Canada; the National Grain and Feed Association; Sunkist Growers; Technokron; The World Bank; the US Central Intelligence Agency; the US Department of Agriculture; and Agriculture and Agri Food Canada. Recent publications include Agricultural Policy, Agribusiness, and Rent-Seeking Behaviour. Dr. Schmitz received a BSA and an MSc from the University of Saskatchewan and an MA and a PhD from the University of Wisconsin. He also received an earned doctor of letters degree from the University of Saskatchewan. John W. Suttie, University of Wisconsin, Madison See About the Authors. * Synthesis Committee member.

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: ~ : {~ ~ S .,. . . ~ ~- k:; : ~ ~ ; -: - ~ ~ :: ~' ;: W~ : l i :~: hi Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources Publications Policy and Resources ,I Agricultural Biotechnology: Strategies for National Competitiveness (1987) Agricultural Biotechnology and the Poor: Proceedings of an International Conference, (2000) Agriculture and Be Undergraduate: Proceedings (1992) Agriculture's Role in K-12 Education: A Forum on Me National Science Education Standards (1998) Alternative Agriculture (1989) Animal Biotechnology: Science-based Concerns (2002) Brucellosis in Be Greater Yellowstone Area (1998) Colleges of Agriculture at the Land Grant Universities: Public Service and Public Policy (1996) Colleges of Agriculture at the Land Grant Universities: A Profile (1995) Countering Agricultural Bioterrorism (2002) Designing an Agricultural Genome Program ( 1998) Designing Foods: Animal Product Options in Be Marketplace (1988) Ecological Monitoring of Genetically Modified Crops (2001 ) Ecologically Based Pest Management: New Solutions for a New Century (1996) Ensuring Safe Food: From Production to Consumption (1998) Environmental Effects of Transgenic Plants: The Scope and Adequacy of Regulation (2002)