search program is proposed that will ultimately lead to greatly decreased emissions to the environment of the constituents of air emissions as well as other losses from AFOs while maintaining a high level of production.

Effective and early adoption of the committee’s recommendations will require the commitment of EPA and USDA to a course of action that will result in scientifically credible information for their air quality programs. It will require a willingness to change the direction of some current programs and to support a vigorous, expanded research agenda. The committee believes that the results will be of great value, not only in protecting health and the environment, but in reducing costs, and improving the health and welfare of the animals.

SETTING PRIORITIES

Air emissions from animal feeding operations are of varying concern at different spatial scales, as shown in Table 8-1 (Finding 2, pp. 4, 71).

RECOMMENDATION: These differing effects, concentrations, and spatial distributions lead to a logical plan of action for establishing research priorities to provide detailed scientific information on the contri-

TABLE 8-1 Committee’s Scientific Evaluation of the Potential Importance of AFO Emissions at Different Spatial Scales

Emissions

Global, National, Regional

Local, Property Line, Nearest Dwelling

Primary Effects of Concern

NH3

Majora

Minor

Atmospheric deposition, haze

N2O

Significant

Insignificant

Global climate change

NOx

Significant

Minor

Haze, atmospheric deposition, smog

CH4

Significant

Insignificant

Global climate change

VOCsb

Insignificant

Minor

Quality of human life

H2S

Insignificant

Significant

Quality of human life

PM10c

Insignificant

Significant

Haze

PM2.5c

Insignificant

Significant

Health, haze

Odor

Insignificant

Major

Quality of human life

aRelative importance of emissions from AFOs at spatial scales based on committee’s informed judgment on known or potential impacts from AFOs. Rank order from high to low importance is major, significant, minor, insignificant. While AFOs may not play an important role for some of these, emissions from other sources alone or in aggregate may have different rankings. For example VOCs and NOx play important roles in the formation of tropospheric ozone; however the role of AFOs is likely insignificant compared to other sources.

bVolatile organic compounds.

cParticulate matter. PM10 and PM2.5 include particles with aerodynamic equivalent diameters up to 10 and 2.5 mm, respectively.

 



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement