TABLE 3-1 Annual Anthropogenic Emissions of Constituents of Concern, 1990a

 

NH3 (Tg N)

N2O (Tg N)

NOb (Tg N)

CH4 (Tg C)

VOCs (Tg mass)

Global

U.S.

Global

U.S.

Global

U.S.

Global

U.S.

Global

U.S.

Energy

 

Fossil fuel combustion + production

0.1

0.0

0.2

0.1

21.2

6.7

70.1

16.3

67.3

10.2

Biofuel combustion

2.2

0.2

0.1

0.0

1.3

0.1

11.5

0.3

31.6

0.9

Industrial Processes

0.2

0.0

0.5

0.1

1.5

0.1

0.6

0.0

55.7

12

Agriculture

 

Agriculture and natural land

12.6

1.0

1.0

0.1

5.2

0.4

44.4

0.4

NAc

NA

Animals

21.1

1.4

1.0

0.1

1.0

0.1

68.7

5.7

NA

NA

Biomass burning

 

Savannah burning

1.8

0.0

0.1

0.0

3.1

0.0

4.8

0.0

4.9

0.0

Deforestation

1.4

0.0

0.0

0.0

1.1

0.0

4.2

0.0

7.8

0.0

Waste

 

Agriculture waste burning

1.3

0.1

0.1

0.0

2.2

0.2

8.9

0.7

13.8

1.2

Landfills

2.7

0.1

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

26.5

7.5

0.0

0.0

Total

43

3

3

0.4

37

8

240

31

181

24

Percent from animals

48

50

33

25

1

1

19

18

NA

NA

a H2S emissions are not available for the level of disaggregation shown for other species, but they are small relative to other S s ources (e.g., SO2 from fossil fuel combustion) on a national and global basis. They might be important on a regional basis in some areas.

b Estimates of NO emissions from manure applied to fields vary substantially. Reported values for the fraction of manure nitrogen lost as NO have been as high as 5.4 percent, but 2 percent was chosen as a midrange value. Uncertainty is approximately a factor of two.

c VOC emissions are not available for agricultural sources except agricultural waste burning.

SOURCE: van Aardenne et al. (2001).



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