Appendix I

Biographical Information of the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative Panel Members and NRC Staff

Linda K.Blum is a research associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia (UVA). Dr. Blum began her career at UVA in 1986 as a research assistant professor. Prior to arriving at UVA, she was a consultant to the South Florida Water Management District, Sitler, Inc., and Hydrosystems, Inc., in Charlottesville, Virginia. She was also a professor of biology at the State University of New York College at Buffalo. She was awarded the NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship in 1998 and 1999 and is a member of the Estuarine Research Federation, Atlantic Estuarine Research Society, American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, American Society for Microbiology, American Phytopathology Society, Society of Sigma Xi, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She holds a B.S. and M.S. in forestry from Michigan Technological University and a Ph.D. in soil science from Cornell University. Dr. Blum has been a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem (CROGEE) since its inception in September 1999.

John A.‘Jeb' Barzen is the director of field ecology at the International Crane Foundation. His research experience is in prairie, savanna, and wetland restoration in southern Wisconsin, southern Vietnam, and southwest China. He received his M.S. in biology from the University of North Dakota (1989), and his B.S. in wildlife biology from the University of Minnesota (1982) and he is an honorary fellow in the Department of Zoology, the Institute of Environmental Studies, and the College of Natural Resources (Stevens Point) at the University of Wisconsin. His main research interests are prairie/savanna wetland restoration in Wisconsin and Asia, linking poverty alleviation with conservation, and implementing conservation on private lands.

Lauren J.Chapman is an associate professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of Florida. She also holds the title of Honorary Lecturer, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, and associate scientist, Wildlife Conservation Society. Dr. Chapman combines ecological and physiological approaches in her research in order to understand the evolution of tropical freshwater fishes. Her



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SCIENCE AND THE GREATER EVERGLADES ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE CRITICAL ECOSYSTEM STUDIES INITIATIVE Appendix I Biographical Information of the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative Panel Members and NRC Staff Linda K.Blum is a research associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia (UVA). Dr. Blum began her career at UVA in 1986 as a research assistant professor. Prior to arriving at UVA, she was a consultant to the South Florida Water Management District, Sitler, Inc., and Hydrosystems, Inc., in Charlottesville, Virginia. She was also a professor of biology at the State University of New York College at Buffalo. She was awarded the NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship in 1998 and 1999 and is a member of the Estuarine Research Federation, Atlantic Estuarine Research Society, American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, American Society for Microbiology, American Phytopathology Society, Society of Sigma Xi, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She holds a B.S. and M.S. in forestry from Michigan Technological University and a Ph.D. in soil science from Cornell University. Dr. Blum has been a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem (CROGEE) since its inception in September 1999. John A.‘Jeb' Barzen is the director of field ecology at the International Crane Foundation. His research experience is in prairie, savanna, and wetland restoration in southern Wisconsin, southern Vietnam, and southwest China. He received his M.S. in biology from the University of North Dakota (1989), and his B.S. in wildlife biology from the University of Minnesota (1982) and he is an honorary fellow in the Department of Zoology, the Institute of Environmental Studies, and the College of Natural Resources (Stevens Point) at the University of Wisconsin. His main research interests are prairie/savanna wetland restoration in Wisconsin and Asia, linking poverty alleviation with conservation, and implementing conservation on private lands. Lauren J.Chapman is an associate professor in the Department of Zoology at the University of Florida. She also holds the title of Honorary Lecturer, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda, and associate scientist, Wildlife Conservation Society. Dr. Chapman combines ecological and physiological approaches in her research in order to understand the evolution of tropical freshwater fishes. Her

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SCIENCE AND THE GREATER EVERGLADES ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE CRITICAL ECOSYSTEM STUDIES INITIATIVE current work in East Africa focuses on the role of wetlands in the maintenance of fish faunal structure and diversity. She is also involved in the conservation and management of tropical waters with an emphasis on patterns of species loss and resurgence in the Lake Victoria basin. She received her Ph.D. from McGill University in 1990. Peter L.deFur is president of a consulting firm, Environmental Stewardship Concepts, and is an affiliate associate professor at the Center for Environmental Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University. He has extensive experience in risk assessment and ecological risk assessment regulations, guidance, and policy. Dr. deFur also worked as a visiting investigator at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Maryland. He was a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST). He serves on the Board of the Science and Environmental Health Network, and he serves as president of the Association for Science in the Public Interest. In 1994–1996 Dr. deFur served on the National Research Council's Committee on Risk Characterization. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in biology (1972 and 1977, respectively) from the College of William and Mary, and his Ph.D. in biology (1980) from the University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. F.Dominic Dottavio has served as the dean and director of the Ohio State University at Marion since 1993, where he also holds an appointment as a professor of natural resources. Prior to arriving at Ohio State, he was the chief scientist and assistant regional director of the National Park Service in Atlanta. In this position, Dr. Dottavio was responsible for the Park Service's scientific and natural resource management activities in 58 parks and 5 universities throughout the southeastern United States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. He also has served as director of the Center for Natural Areas in Washington, D.C., and was a policy analyst with the Heritage Conservation/Recreation Service. Dr. Dottavio has authored over 100 publications on tourism, outdoor recreation, and Natural Parks Service resource management issues and has served on the boards and advisory councils of a number of professional organizations, including the Renewable Natural Resources Foundation, Archbold Tropical Research Center, Southern Appalachians Man and the Biosphere Program, Virgin Islands Research and Resource Management Cooperative, and Oak Studies Board. He earned a B.S. in natural resource management in 1973 from the Ohio State University, an M.S. from Yale University in 1975, and a Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1979. William L.Graf is the Education Foundation University Professor and professor of geography at the University of South Carolina. His specialties include fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, as well as policy for public land and water. His research and teaching have focused on river-channel change, human impacts on river processes, morphology, and ecology, along with contaminant transport and storage in river systems. In the arena of public policy, he has emphasized the interaction of science and decision making, and the resolution of conflicts among economic development, historical preservation, and environmental restoration for rivers. He has authored or edited 7 books and more than 120 scientific papers, book chapters, and reports, and he has given more than 90 public presentations. He is past president of the Association of American Geographers and has been an

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SCIENCE AND THE GREATER EVERGLADES ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE CRITICAL ECOSYSTEM STUDIES INITIATIVE officer in the Geological Society of America. President Clinton appointed him to the Presidential Commission on American Heritage Rivers. His NRC service includes membership on the Water Science and Technology Board and the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He has served on many NRC committees and has chaired NRC committees on innovative watershed management and research priorities of the U.S. Geological Survey. He is a National Associate of the National Academies. His Ph.D. is from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with a major in physical geography and a minor in water resources management. James P.Heaney is a professor at the University of Colorado in the Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering. He was a professor of environmental engineering sciences at the University of Florida for 23 years and served as director of the Florida Water Resources Research Center from 1979 to 1991. Dr. Heaney's current research interests focus on developing simulation and optimization techniques to evaluate innovative urban water infrastructure systems including water supply, wastewater, and stormwater. He has served as vice-chair on the American Society of Civil Engineers' Urban Water Resources Research Council from 1999 until the present. Dr. Heaney has over 170 publications and serves as a diplomat for the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. Dr. Heaney has served the National Academies as a member of the Committee on Watershed Management, the Panel on Sources, and the Water Science and Technology Board. He earned his BSCE from Illinois Institute of Technology in 1962, his MSCE from Northwestern University in 1965, and his Ph.D. in civil engineering from Northwestern University in 1968. Stephen R.Humphrey is dean of the College of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Florida, where he also serves as affiliate professor of Latin American studies, wildlife ecology, and zoology. Prior to his appointment as dean, he served as interim dean from 1993 to 1997 and as interim chair of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation from 1996 to 1997. He was the commissioner and chair of the Environmental Regulation Commission, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, from 1991 to 1999. He served as a member of the Florida Panther Technical Advisory Council, Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, from 1992 to 1997. For the past 12 years, he has served as the chief financial officer for the Society for Conservation Biology. In addition, he sat as chairman of the Board of Trustees for the Florida Chapter of The Nature Conservancy from 1987 to 1989, and he continues his service as a trustee. Dr. Humphrey has been a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem (CROGEE) since its inception in September 1999. Stephen S.Light is director of the Center for Working Landscapes at the Institute for Agricultural and Trade Policy in Minneapolis, Minnesota. As a policy director with the South Florida Water Management District in the early 1980s, Dr. Light helped introduce the concept of adaptive management to the management of the Florida Everglades, and he helped develop an iterative testing process for reintroducing flows into the Shark River slough in Everglades National Park. Dr. Light was a coeditor of the widely cited 1995 volume on Barriers and Bridges to the Renewal of Ecosystems and Institutions . He received his B.S. degree from Thiel College, his M.S. degree from Pennsylvania State University,

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SCIENCE AND THE GREATER EVERGLADES ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE CRITICAL ECOSYSTEM STUDIES INITIATIVE and his Ph.D. degree in natural resources policy and management from the University of Michigan. Charles R.O'Melia is the Abel Wolman Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. After receiving his master 's degree in environmental engineering, Dr. O'Melia worked for Hazen and Sawyer, Engineers (1956–1957). He then returned to Michigan to study for his doctorate, working on the filtration of algal suspensions. From 1961 to 1964, he served as assistant professor of sanitary engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. In 1964–1966 he was a postdoctoral fellow and lecturer in water chemistry at Harvard University. He joined the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill in 1966 as associate professor and became professor in 1970. From 1977 to 1980, he served as deputy chair of the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at UNC. He assumed the position of professor of environmental engineering at Johns Hopkins in 1980 and served as department chair from 1990 to 1995. In 1998, he was appointed as Abel Wolman Chair in Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Chemistry Society, the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, the American Water Works Association, the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, the Association of Environmental Engineering Professors, Tau Beta Pi, Chi Epsilon, and Sigma Xi. He has served as director, vice president, and president of the Association of Environmental Engineering Professors. He is a past member of the Water Science and Technology Board and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, and has served on many NRC committees. Carol M.Wicks is associate professor of geological sciences at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Her expertise is in karst hydrology and geochemistry, including numerical modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport, the response of basins to recharge events, and disturbance to stygobitic species due to recharge events. She received a B.S. in chemical engineering from Clarkson University, a M.E. in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia. She also completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the U.S. Geological Survey. She is the President of the Karst Waters Institute and a member of the Geological Society of America and the American Geophysical Union. She has served as associate editor of the journals Groundwater and Water Resources Research and is currently an editor of the virtual international journal “Speleogenesis and Evolution of Karst Aquifers. ” Daniel E.Willard is professor emeritus of the Indiana University's Department of Biology and School of Public and Environmental Affairs. He taught zoology at the University of Texas from 1966 to 1970, and he then taught at the University of Wisconsin through 1977. In 1986, he won Indiana University's Distin-guished Teaching Award. From 1986 to 1992, he served as the director of Envi-ronmental Science and Policy Programs. Dr. Willard's research interests are wetland ecology, natural resources management, and aquatic biology. Dr. Willard has served the National Academies as a member of the Committee on the Resto-

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SCIENCE AND THE GREATER EVERGLADES ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE CRITICAL ECOSYSTEM STUDIES INITIATIVE ration of Aquatic Ecosystems: Science, Technology, and Public Policy (1989– 1991), and on the Committee on Irrigation Induced Water Quality Problems (1985–1990). Dr. Willard has served the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, the Department of Justice, and the Environmental Protection Agency's Wetland Committee among others. He earned his Ph.D. in zoology from the University of California, Davis, in 1966, and his A.B. in biology from Stanford University in 1959. He retired in 1998. He is currently the president of the Sycamore Land Trust. National Research Council Staff Stephanie Johnson is a project officer with the Water Science and Technology Board. She received her B.A. from Vanderbilt University in chemistry and geology, and her M.S. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia. She is currently finishing her Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia on the subject of pesticide transport and microbial bioavailability in soils. Her research interests include contaminant transport, aqueous geochemistry, and hydrogeology. She joined the National Research Council in 2002. Jon Q.Sanders is a senior project assistant with the Water Science and Technology Board. He holds a B.A. in anthropology (1998) from Trinity University. He is a member of the American Anthropological Association, the Society for Applied Anthropology, the Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists, and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. He is coauthor of “Sitting Down at the Table: Mediation and Resolution of Water Conflicts” (2001). Jon's research interests include organizational culture, political ecology, and environmental decision making.