Appendixes



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Appendixes

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A Committee Member Biographical Sketches MILLARD F. ROSE, chair, is vice-president for research at Radiance Technologies, Inc. He is a former director of the Science Directorate at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Space Flight Center, and also a former professor of electrical engineering and director of the Space Power Institute at Auburn University. He is the author of well over 100 technical publications dealing with highpower electromechanics, energy conversion, and environmental effects. Dr. Rose received his B.S. degree in physics from the University of Virginia and his M.S. and Ph.D. in solid-state science from Pennsylvania State University. He has served on the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee on Electric Power for the Dismounted Soldier and is a current member of the National Research Council’s Board on Army Science and Technology. RAJ AGGARWAL is vice-president, Advanced Technology Center, at Rockwell Collins. He is a former director of research and technology for Alliant Techsystems, Inc., and a director of advanced programs for Honeywell, Inc. Dr. Aggarwal received a B.S. degree in physics (with honors) and B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical and communications engineering from Delhi University in Delhi, India. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Purdue University. DAVID E. ASPNES is Distinguished Professor of Physics at North Carolina State University. He has been a department head for Bell Communications Research and a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories. He is noted for creative instrumentation, which is widely used in the manufacture of microelectronic devices, and optical control systems. Dr. Aspnes received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign. JOHN T. FEDDEMA is Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at the Sandia National Laboratories. He served as principal investigator for DARPA research projects, including analysis and control software for distributed robotic systems, microassembly, miniature cooperative robotic systems, and microrobots. He is editor of the Journal of Micromechatronics. Dr. Feddema received his B.S. degree from Iowa State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Purdue University. J. WILLIAM GOODWINE, JR. is assistant professor in the Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Notre Dame. He received his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Notre Dame, a J.D. degree from Harvard University, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied mechanics from the California Institute of Technology. CLINTON W. KELLY III is senior vice-president at Science Applications International Corporation. He is a former director of the U.S. Strategic Computing Program and former executive director of the DARPA Office for Information Science and Technology. He initiated and directed the DARPA Autonomous Land Vehicle program and currently reviews research on perception for autonomous mobility, planning, and robotic behaviors. Dr. Kelly received his B.S. degree from Duke University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan, all in electrical engineering. LARRY LEHOWICZ is vice-president at Quantum Research International. He retired from the U.S. Army as a major general and commander of the U.S. Army Operational Test and Evaluation Command, an organization dedicated to ensuring that warfighting systems, information management systems, and other military equipment are prepared for com-

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bat use. Gen. Lehowicz served as Deputy Chief of Staff for Combat Development at the Army Training and Doctrine Command, and he was Assistant Division Commander of the Tenth Mountain Division. He is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College and has an M.B.A. from Syracuse University. He served previously as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Alternative Technologies for Anti-Personnel Landmines. ALAN J. McLAUGHLIN is a consultant in the strategic planning and advanced technology fields. He retired as assistant director of the MIT Lincoln Laboratory, where he was responsible for programs in radar and image signal processing, computer networks, and machine intelligence technology. Currently, he is special assistant to the director, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, and a visiting scientist at the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute. Mr. McLaughlin received his B.S. and M.S. from North-eastern University, and he saw military service as a lieutenant in the Army Signal Corps. He has served on the Defense Science and Air Force Scientific Advisory Board studies, and he is a past member of the National Research Council’s Committees on Future Technologies for Army Multimedia Communications, Modernization of Air Force Computerized Administrative Support System, and Modernization of the Worldwide Military Command and Control System. ROBIN R. MURPHY is associate professor of computer science and engineering and associate professor of cognitive and neural science at the University of South Florida. She is a consultant to the Institute for Defense Analyses on future unmanned systems and a consultant to the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. Dr. Murphy received a B.M.E. degree in mechanical engineering and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She has authored several books on artificial intelligence and robotics. MALCOLM R. O’NEILL is vice-president and chief technical officer of the Lockheed Martin Corporation. During a distinguished 34-year career in the U.S. Army, Lt. Gen. O’Neill served as director of the DOD Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, director of the Army Acquisition Corps, and commander of the Army Laboratory Command. Additionally, he has managed R&D programs for the Army, DARPA, and NATO. Dr. O’Neill received his Ph.D. in physics from Rice University. ERNEST N. PETRICK is a consultant on military ground vehicles and propulsion systems. He is a former technical director for the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Command and retired chief scientist of General Dynamics Land Systems. He received his B.S. degree from Carnegie Institute of Technology and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from Purdue University. He has served on the Army Science Board and was a member of the National Research Council’s Committee to Perform a Technology Assessment Focused on Logistics Support Requirements for Future Army Combat Systems. AZRIEL ROSENFELD is professor emeritus at the University of Maryland. He is a former director of the Center for Automation Research at the University of Maryland. Dr. Rosenfeld received his Ph.D. in mathematics from Columbia University. He has published over 30 books and over 600 chapters or journal articles. He is an expert in computer image analysis. ALBERT A. SCIARRETTA is president of CNS Technologies, Inc., consultants on research and development, modeling and simulation, management, and support of advanced information technologies and systems to the Defense Modeling and Simulation Office and other DOD agencies. He is a former manager of advanced information technologies at Quantum Research International, Inc., and a program area manager for the MITRE Corporation. Mr. Sciarretta has a B.S. degree from the U.S. Military Academy and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering and operations research from Stanford University. He previously served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Review of the Department of Defense Air and Space Systems Science and Technology Program and on the National Research Council staff. STEVEN E. SHLADOVER is deputy director of the California Partners for Advanced Transit and Highways (PATH) program, Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Berkeley. He has published extensively on intelligent vehicle and highway systems, advanced vehicle control systems, and vehicle system dynamics. Dr. Shladover received his S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.