Appendixes



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Appendixes

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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Keith C.Clarke, chair, is a research cartographer and professor. He holds a B.A. degree with honors from Middlesex Polytechnic, London, England, and M.A. and Ph. D. degrees from the University of Michigan, specializing in analytical cartography. Dr. Clarke’s most recent research has been on environmental simulation modeling, modeling urban growth using cellular automata, terrain mapping and analysis, and the history of the CORONA remote-sensing program. Dr. Clarke is the former North American editor of the International Journal of Geographical Information Systems, and is series editor for the Prentice Hall Series in Geographic Information Science. In 1990 and 1991 Dr. Clarke was a NASA/American Society for Engineering Education Fellow at Stanford University, and in 1992 served as science advisor to the Office of Research, National Mapping Division of the U.S. Geological Survey in Reston, Virginia. He is the Santa Barbara director of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis and chairs the Geography Department at University of California, Santa Barbara. He served as president of the Cartographic and Geographic Information Society for 2000–2001, and currently chairs the American Congress on Surveying and Mapping’s Communications Committee. Michael R.Armstrong is chief information officer of the City of Des Moines in Iowa. He is responsible for all voice and data systems in the

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jurisdiction. Since September 1997 he has led the development of the city’s technical environment, including implementation of permitting and licensing, and enterprise GIS systems. A frequent contributor to national journals and speaker at regional and national meetings, Mr. Armstrong is a member of the Urban and Regional Information Systems Association, the Center for Digital Government, and the Metropolitan Information Exchange. He is technical advisor to the Des Moines/Cherkasy (Ukraine) development partnership and chair of Public Technologies, Inc.’s Telecommunications and Information Task Force. David J.Cowen is head of the Geography Department, codirector of the NASA Visiting Investigator program, and Carolina Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of South Carolina. His research and instruction have focused on geographic information systems. He chairs the Mapping Science Committee of the National Research Council. Dr. Cowen earned B.A. and M.A. degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Ph.D. degree in geography from Ohio State University. Donna P.Koepp is currently head of the Government Documents and Microforms Library and head of reference and instruction for the Social Sciences program at Harvard University. Her specialty has been government-produced maps and the history of mapping by federal agencies. Ms. Koepp is active in the Cartographic Users Advisory Council, representing the American Library Association Government Documents Round Table and acting as liaison to the U.S. Government Printing Office and the Federal Geographic Data Committee. Following a B.A. degree from the University of Colorado, Boulder, she worked at the Denver Public Library with government documents and maps as a subject specialist and reference librarian and received an M.A. in librarianship from the University of Denver. Ms. Koepp worked with maps and government documents at the University of Kansas before moving to Harvard University. Xavier R.Lopez is director of Oracle’s Location Services group. Dr. Lopez leads Oracle’s efforts to incorporate spatial technologies across Oracle’s database, application server eBusiness applications. He has 12 years of experience in GIS and spatial databases. He holds advanced engineering and planning degrees from the University of Maine, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of California, Davis. Dr. Lopez has been active in numerous academic and government research initiatives on geographic information. He is the author of a book on government spatial information policy and has written over 50 scientific and industrial

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publications in areas related to spatial information technology. Since December 2001 Dr. Lopez has served on the Committee on Multimodal Transportation Requirements for Spatial Information Infrastructure at the National Research Council. Richard D.Miller is the Kansas chief information technology architect and director of the Kansas Information Technology Office. These duties encompass coordination of enterprise information technology activities, including strategic planning, policy development and implementation, and IT architecture development and maintenance. He is also director of the Kansas Geographic Information Systems Initiative, serving in this role since 1995. Previous experience in spatial and information technologies include that of supervisory geographer for the U.S. Bureau of the Census and as GIS coordinator and chief of systems management for the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. Mr. Miller represents the GIS community on the Kansas Information Technology Advisory Board, serves as secretary to the Kansas Information Technology Executive Council, and is president of the National States Geographic Information Council. He is also former consortium and symposium chairman for the Mid-America Geographic Information Consortium. He holds a B.S. in education and an M.A. in geography, both from the University of Kansas. Gale W.TeSelle recently retired from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, where he was the national GIS program manager, and the acting chief information officer of the Natural Resources Conservation Service. Mr. TeSelle received his bachelor’s degree in geography from the Nebraska Wesleyan University and his Master’s degree in geography from the University of Nebraska. Mr. TeSelle was a founding member of the National Aerial Photography program, National Digital Orthophotography program, and the Federal Interagency Coordinating Committee on Digital Cartography. As chair of the latter’s Standards Working Group for seven years, he authored the National Geo-Data System plan, which served as the concept and vision for the National Spatial Data Infrastructure. Mr. TeSelle helped form the Federal Geographic Data Committee and served as an active member of the FGDC Coordination Committee. Waldo R.Tobler received his degrees in geography from the University of Washington in Seattle, and is currently professor emeritus of geography at the University of California at Santa Barbara. Dr. Tobler was one of the principal investigators and a senior scientist in the National Science Foundation-sponsored National Center for Geographic Information and

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Analysis. He has served on numerous entities of the National Research Council, the most recent being the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He has been on the editorial board of several journals, including The American Cartographer, Journal of Regional Science, Geographical Analysis, and the International Journal of Geographical Information Systems. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and until his retirement was a member of the Royal Geographical Society of Great Britain. He served as the U.S. delegate to the International Geographical Union commission on geographical data processing and sensing. Current concerns relate to ideas in computational geography, including the analysis of vector fields and the development of global trade models. Nancy von Meyer, vice-president of Fairview Industries, provides consulting, education, and GIS implementation services to government agencies and the private sector. She received her Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989. Dr. von Meyer works with many counties and local governments on parcel, land records, and system design for automation and modernization projects. She is also active in federal initiatives related to the FGDC Cadastral Data Content Standard, the National Integrated Lands System, eastern states cadastral initiatives, and other land records projects. Dr. von Meyer served on the Mapping Science Committee of the National Research Council from 1994 to 1997. National Research Council Staff Paul M.Cutler, study director, is a program officer for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council. He directs the Mapping Science Committee and ad hoc studies on earth science and mapping science issues. Before joining the NRC Dr. Cutler was an assistant scientist and lecturer in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research is in the area of surficial processes, specifically glaciology, hydrology, and quaternary science. In addition to numerical modeling and GIS research he has conducted field studies in Alaska, Antarctica, arctic Sweden, the Swiss Alps, Pakistan’s Karakoram mountains, the midwestern United States, and Canadian Rockies. He is a member of the Geological Society of America, American Geophysical Union, Geological Society of Washington, and a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. He received a bachelor’s degree from Manchester University, England, a master’s degree from the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota.

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Eileen M.Mctague is a research assistant for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council. She holds an M.S. degree in environmental science from American University and a B.S. degree in biology from Pennsylvania State University. Ms. McTague has interned at the National Academy of Engineering, the Renewable Natural Resources Foundation, and Discovery Creek Children’s Museum. Radhika S.Chari is a senior project assistant for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council.

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