Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of Military Combat Vehicles

The Crusader Artillery System

Committee on Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of the Crusader Artillery System

Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design

Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
Washington, D.C. www.nap.edu



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Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of Military Combat Vehicles The Crusader Artillery System Committee on Evaluation of Manufacturing Vision and Strategies for the Production of the Crusader Artillery System Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS Washington, D.C. www.nap.edu

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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This study was supported by Contract/Grant No. DAAE30-00-C-1040 between the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Department of the Army. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project. A limited number of additional copies are available from the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design (BMED), 500 Fifth Street, N.W., TNA-W930, Washington, D.C. 20001; (202) 334–3505 (in the Washington metropolitan area); Internet, <http://www.nas.edu/bmaed> Copyright 2003 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America

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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Bruce M.Alberts is president of the National Academy of Sciences. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Wm. A.Wulf is president of the National Academy of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine. The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National. Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce M.Alberts and Dr. Wm. A.Wulf are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council www.national-academies.org

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COMMITTEE ON EVALUATION OF MANUFACTURING VISION AND STRATEGIES FOR THE PRODUCTION OF THE CRUSADER ARTILLERY SYSTEM THOM J.HODGSON, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, Chair ERNEST R.BLOOD, Caterpillar, Inc. (retired), Mossville, Illinois CLIVE L.DYM, Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, California JAY LEE, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee CELESTINE A.NTUEN, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro STEVEN R.RAY, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland Staff TAMARA L.DICKINSON, Associate Director and Senior Program Officer PATRICK DOYLE, Program Officer (through June 2002) EMILY ANN MEYER, Research Associate Sponsor Liaison SCOTT KNUDSEN, U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey

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BOARD ON MANUFACTURING AND ENGINEERING DESIGN JOSEPH G.WIRTH, Raychem Corporation (retired), Mt. Shasta, California, Chair F.PETER BOER, Tiger Scientific, Inc., Boynton Beach, Florida HARRY E.COOK, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign PAMELA A.DREW, Boeing Company, Bellevue, Washington ROBERT J.EAGAN, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico PAUL B.GERMERAAD, Aurigin Systems, Inc., Cupertino, California RICHARD KEGG, Milacron, Inc. (retired), Cincinnati, Ohio JAY LEE, University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee JAMES MATTICE, Universal Technology Corporation, Dayton, Ohio MICHAEL McGRATH, Sarnoff Corporation, Arlington, Virginia MANISH MEHTA, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, Michigan JOSEPH H.MIZE, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater JAMES B.RICE, JR., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge ALFONSO VELOSA III, Gartner, Inc., Portland, Oregon JOHN F.WHITE, Altarum, Ann Arbor, Michigan JOEL SAMUEL YUDKEN, AFL-CIO, Washington, D.C. Staff TONI MARECHAUX, Director TAMARA L.DICKINSON, Associate Director and Senior Program Officer

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Acknowledgments The committee wishes to thank Peter Cherry, Altarum, for providing invaluable background and insight into the Crusader program. The committee also wishes to thank the following United Defense employees for their briefs at the meeting held from April 10 to 12, 2002: Jeff Frenkel, Bob Jorgensen, Louise Morgan, Julie Resser, A.C. Shepherd, and Mark Signorelli. The committee also acknowledges the hard work and effort of the past and present Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design staff. Finally, the committee would like to thank Rocco Perciballi and Scott Knudsen of Picatinny Arsenal for their cooperation. This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report: Mark G.Benz, Engineering Horizons International, James F.Lardner, Davenport, Iowa, Ingo W.May, Hicks & Associates, Joseph F.Mize, Oklahoma State University, and F.Stan Settles, University of Southern California. Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Hyla Napadensky, Napadensky Energetics, Inc., and James Solberg, Purdue University. Appointed by the National Research Council, they were responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

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Contents     EXECUTIVE SUMMARY   1 1   INTRODUCTION   7 2   ENGINEERING A MANUFACTURING ENTERPRISE   11     Manufacturing Needs,   11     The Army’s Manufacturing Vision,   12     The Enterprise Model,   13     Product Data Management,   15     Enterprise Integration in Next-Generation Manufacturing,   16     Production Management,   17     Supply Chain Strategy,   17     Scheduling and Tracking,   18 3   CROSSCUTTING ISSUES   21     Engineering Change Management,   21     Risk Management,   21     Manufacturing Ergonomics,   22     Information Management,   23     Modeling and Simulation,   25     REFERENCES   27     APPENDIX         Biographies of Committee Members   29

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Sidebars Sidebar 1.1   Statement of Task,   8 Sidebar 1.2   The Relationship of the Crusader Project to the Totally Integrated Munitions Enterprise (TIME) Program,   9 Sidebar 2.1   Manufacturing Vision for the Crusader,   11 Sidebar 2.2   The Army’s Production Enterprise Objectives,   12 Sidebar 2.3   Next-Generation Manufacturing Imperatives,   13