Box B.1 Six-Point Program on Public-Private Sector Relationships

  1. Advise all field offices that industrial meteorology is a legitimate field of endeavor and should be encouraged and aided by the Weather Bureau in the interest of the national economy.

  2. Advise all organizations now served by the Weather Bureau that they are not getting an individualized and specialized service (i.e., added information and/ or more service than is normally given the general public) and furnish them with a list of consulting firms approved for teletype service.

  3. Advise individuals or organizations seeking specialized services that it is not a Weather Bureau function and with their consent refer the matter to the Central Office of the Weather Bureau for transmittal to the American Meteorological Society and the meteorological consultants.

  4. Advise all Weather Bureau personnel that they should be alert to point out and develop cases in business where the employment of a consulting meteorologist would aid in developing applied meteorology.

  5. Accept grants from individuals or organizations for research and statistical surveys only when they cannot be accomplished by or with private consulting meteorologists.

  6. The service of looking after interest of private concerns and the initiating of special advice for commercial uses is the field of consulting meteorology and the Weather Bureau will make it a practice to refer to the field of consulting meteorologists requests for services of this kind.

SOURCE: American Meteorological Society, 1949, Report of the executive secretary, 1948, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, v. 30, p. 140-141.

seeking to use their expertise in weather to make a living.1 The resulting growth of commercial weather services led the American Meteorological Society (AMS) to arrange for a conference in 1948 “to clarify the relationship between the Weather Bureau and private meteorologists.” This conference resulted in an agreement between the chief of the Weather Bureau, representatives of Industrial Weather Consulting Services, and the AMS. This agreement was titled the “Six-Point Program” and is reproduced in its entirety in Box B.1. The agreement was, however, never adopted as formal policy by the Weather Bureau.2

1  

American Meteorological Society, 1949, Report of the executive secretary, 1948, Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, v. 30, p. 140-141.

2  

Weather Bureau, 1948, Policy with respect to private practice of meteorology and instructions regarding cooperation with private meteorologists, Circular Letter 22-48, March 9.



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