Table 2-1. Policies of 56 Most Frequently Cited Life-Science and Medical Journals

 

Percentage of journals

Type of Policy

All Journals (N=56)

Society or Association Publishers (N=37)

Commercial Publishers (N=19)

Life-Sciences Journals (N=38)

Clinical-Medicine Journals (N=18)

Sharing materials

39 %

30 %

58 %

47 %

22 %

Sharing software

2

0

5

3

0

Depositing data

41

35

58

53

17

Statement of consequences

2

3

0

0

6

Whom to contact

4

3

5

3

6

No policy

45

49

42

32

72

Note: Journals were identified in a search of the Institute for Scientific Information Journal Citation Reports in the life sciences and medicine. The output was sorted by impact factor; review journals were excluded. The policies of the top 56 journals (as found on their Web pages) were the basis for the table. Percentages were rounded to whole numbers.

strains). Insofar that scientific publication is central to the forward progress of the scientific community, it is presumed that an author must provide data and materials in a way that others can build on them. These widely held expectations are not necessarily incorporated in current journal policies.

THE PRINCIPLES OF PUBLICATION

At the workshop and in its deliberations, the committee attempted to distill the community’s most basic interests in the process of publication. It found that a majority of the scientific community held common ideas and values about publication and the role it plays in science, and that those ideas have guided the development of community standards that facilitate the use of scientific information and ensure its quality. Central to those ideas is a concept the committee called “the uniform



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