Appendix M
Short Biographies

TASK GROUP

James P. Bagian, NAE, is the director of the Veterans Health Administration's National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS), which was established to develop and lead activities and programs concerned with improving patient safety. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Preventive Medicine with subspecialty certification in aerospace medicine and is a registered professional engineer. Dr. Bagian was a NASA astronaut for more than 15 years, has extensive experience in aviation-related safety systems and human factors, and served as one of the lead investigators of the Challenger accident. Dr. Bagian chairs the VA Expert Advisory Panel on Patient Safety System Design. He is a faculty member of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health at the University of Texas; a faculty member of the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences’ F. Edward Herbert School of Medicine; and a member of the board of directors of the Aerospace Human Factors Society. Dr. Bagian was a member of the NRC Steering Committee for the Workshop on Reducing Space Science Research Mission costs (1996-1997), a joint Space Studies Board and Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board study; was a member of the SSB's Steering Group for the Workshop on Bionics for Space Exploration (1997-1998); and was chair of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board's Committee on Advanced Technology for Human Support in Space (1996-1997). Dr. Bagian served on the SSB from 1995 to 1997 and is currently a member of the Board and chair of the Committee on Space Biology and Medicine.

Adele L. Boskey is the Starr Chair in Mineralized Tissue Research at the Hospital for Special Surgery, a professor of biochemistry at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and an adjunct professor of bioengineering at the City College of New York. She was director of research at the Hospital for Special Surgery until July 1, 2002. Dr. Boskey investigates calcium phosphate crystal deposition within the extracellular matrices of bones, teeth, ligaments, and tendons in mammals using solution, cell culture and in vivo models. Dr. Boskey had experiments fly on the space shuttle in 1994 and 1996 and has served on NIH-NASA advisory panels. She is a past president of the Orthopedic Research Society and president of the International Conferences on the Chemistry and Biology of Mineralized Tissues, and she served on the NRC Task Group for the Evaluation of NASA's Biotechnology Facility for the International Space Station, 1999-2000.

John F. Brady, NAE, is the Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. His awards and honors include the Joliot-Curie Professor, E.S.P.C.I., Paris (1988 and 1996); Professional Progress Award, AICHE (1988); ASEE Curtis W. McGraw Research Award (1993); Corrsin Lecture in Fluid Mechanics, Johns Hopkins University (1995); J.M. Burgers Professor, Twente University, The Netherlands (1997); and the G.K. Batchelor Lecture in Fluid Mechanics, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, England (1997). Dr. Brady's research interests cover suspensions and colloids, applied mathematics and computational physics, and fluid mechanics and transport processes.

Jay C. Buckey, Jr., is a research associate professor of medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. He was coinvestigator on cardiovascular experiments on the SLS-1 space shuttle mission and was an alternate payload specialist for the SLS-2 space shuttle mission. In 1998 he flew as a payload specialist astronaut on the Neurolab space mission, STS-90, which focused on the effects of microgravity on the brain and nervous system. Dr. Buckey is immediate past president of the American Society of Gravitational and Space Biology and a member of the NRC Committee on Space Biology and Medicine.



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Factors Affecting the Utilization of the International Space Station for Research in the Biological and Physical Sciences Appendix M Short Biographies TASK GROUP James P. Bagian, NAE, is the director of the Veterans Health Administration's National Center for Patient Safety (NCPS), which was established to develop and lead activities and programs concerned with improving patient safety. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Preventive Medicine with subspecialty certification in aerospace medicine and is a registered professional engineer. Dr. Bagian was a NASA astronaut for more than 15 years, has extensive experience in aviation-related safety systems and human factors, and served as one of the lead investigators of the Challenger accident. Dr. Bagian chairs the VA Expert Advisory Panel on Patient Safety System Design. He is a faculty member of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health at the University of Texas; a faculty member of the Department of Military and Emergency Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences’ F. Edward Herbert School of Medicine; and a member of the board of directors of the Aerospace Human Factors Society. Dr. Bagian was a member of the NRC Steering Committee for the Workshop on Reducing Space Science Research Mission costs (1996-1997), a joint Space Studies Board and Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board study; was a member of the SSB's Steering Group for the Workshop on Bionics for Space Exploration (1997-1998); and was chair of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board's Committee on Advanced Technology for Human Support in Space (1996-1997). Dr. Bagian served on the SSB from 1995 to 1997 and is currently a member of the Board and chair of the Committee on Space Biology and Medicine. Adele L. Boskey is the Starr Chair in Mineralized Tissue Research at the Hospital for Special Surgery, a professor of biochemistry at Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and an adjunct professor of bioengineering at the City College of New York. She was director of research at the Hospital for Special Surgery until July 1, 2002. Dr. Boskey investigates calcium phosphate crystal deposition within the extracellular matrices of bones, teeth, ligaments, and tendons in mammals using solution, cell culture and in vivo models. Dr. Boskey had experiments fly on the space shuttle in 1994 and 1996 and has served on NIH-NASA advisory panels. She is a past president of the Orthopedic Research Society and president of the International Conferences on the Chemistry and Biology of Mineralized Tissues, and she served on the NRC Task Group for the Evaluation of NASA's Biotechnology Facility for the International Space Station, 1999-2000. John F. Brady, NAE, is the Chevron Professor of Chemical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. His awards and honors include the Joliot-Curie Professor, E.S.P.C.I., Paris (1988 and 1996); Professional Progress Award, AICHE (1988); ASEE Curtis W. McGraw Research Award (1993); Corrsin Lecture in Fluid Mechanics, Johns Hopkins University (1995); J.M. Burgers Professor, Twente University, The Netherlands (1997); and the G.K. Batchelor Lecture in Fluid Mechanics, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, England (1997). Dr. Brady's research interests cover suspensions and colloids, applied mathematics and computational physics, and fluid mechanics and transport processes. Jay C. Buckey, Jr., is a research associate professor of medicine at Dartmouth Medical School. He was coinvestigator on cardiovascular experiments on the SLS-1 space shuttle mission and was an alternate payload specialist for the SLS-2 space shuttle mission. In 1998 he flew as a payload specialist astronaut on the Neurolab space mission, STS-90, which focused on the effects of microgravity on the brain and nervous system. Dr. Buckey is immediate past president of the American Society of Gravitational and Space Biology and a member of the NRC Committee on Space Biology and Medicine.

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Factors Affecting the Utilization of the International Space Station for Research in the Biological and Physical Sciences Meredith B. Colket III is a fellow at United Technologies Research Center (UTRC). Dr. Colket has directed and/or participated in research in chemical kinetics, CVD processes, coal devolatilization, combustion of alternative fuels, measurement of nitric oxide, probe phenomena, fuels research, coking studies, soot formation (modeling and experiments), NO formation and control, catalytic combustion processes, and development of combustion models and pollutant submodels for CFD codes. He is a member of the American Chemical Society, the Combustion Institute, AAAS, and AIAA. He has served as a member of the Microgravity Combustion Science Discipline Working Group since 1999; as chair of the Eastern States Section of the Combustion Institute, 1999-2001; and as a member, Advisory Committee 21st Symposium on Combustion, 1986. Herman Z. Cummins, NAS, is the Distinguished Professor of Physics at City College of the City University of New York, where he directs a program of laser light-scattering studies of liquids and solids. His major effort is in the study of phase transitions and critical phenomena, most recently involving the liquid-glass transition, using Raman and Brillouin scattering and photon correlation spectroscopy. He is noted as the coinventor of laser Doppler velocimetry and pioneered light-scattering techniques to study diffusion, size, and shape of particles in solution. His research has concerned primarily the application of light-scattering spectroscopy to a variety of problems in physics and materials science. Lynette Jones is a principal research scientist in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her primary research is on the human proprioceptive system and the role of muscle and cutaneous mechanoreceptors in sensory processes. This research has led to studies of haptic interfaces that are used to interact with computer-generated virtual environments and teleoperated robots. She also does research on the development of wearable health-monitoring devices and is involved in developing a portable system to evaluate the visual-vestibular system. Dr. Jones is a member of the Society for Neuroscience and the NRC Committee on Space Biology and Medicine. Alan Lawley, NAE, is the Grosvenor Professor of Metallurgy in the Department of Materials Engineering at Drexel University. Dr. Lawley's professional interests and activities involve teaching and research in the areas of physical and mechanical metallurgy, powder metallurgy, composite materials, materials engineering design, and engineering education. The overall mission of his research is to develop and exploit the science base of powder technology and to identify the complex relationships that exist between processing, microstructure, and properties, with a strong emphasis on particulate processing science. His current research focuses on the press and sinter processing of new ferrous alloys, and spray forming. Dr. Lawley is a fellow of APMI International and ASM International, is a former president of the Metallurgical Society (1982) and of the AIME (1987), has consulted extensively for government and industry, and served as a member of the National Materials Advisory Board. He received the Distinguished Service to Powder Metallurgy Award of the Metal Powder Industries Federation (1991), the Jenkins Award of the Institute of Materials (1996), the ASM Gold Medal (1996), and the TMS Educator Award (2002). He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Powder Metallurgy. Steven E. Pfeiffer, a professor of microbiology at the University of Connecticut Health Center, has interests in molecular, cell, and developmental biology of the nervous system and myelinogenesis. A recipient of the Javitz Neuroscience Investigator Award from the National Institutes of Health, he is a member of the American Association of Cell Biologists; the American Society for Neurochemistry; the International Society for Developmental Neuroscience, of which he is past president; and the Society for Neuroscience. Dr. Pfeiffer is a member of the NRC Committee on Space Biology and Medicine. Richard Setlow, NAS, is a senior biophysicist in the Biology Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Setlow’s research interests include studies in far-ultraviolet spectroscopy, molecular biophysics, and environmental carcinogenesis. He received the Finsen Medal in 1980 for "outstanding contributions to photobiology and repair of nucleic acids" and the Enrico Fermi Award in 1989 from the

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Factors Affecting the Utilization of the International Space Station for Research in the Biological and Physical Sciences U.S. Department of Energy for "pioneering and far-reaching contributions to the fields of radiation biophysics and molecular biology." He is a member of the AAAS, the Biophysical Society, the American Society for Photobiology, the Environmental Mutagen Society, and the American Association for Cancer Research. Dr. Setlow's previous NRC service includes membership on the Committee on Human Exploration (1998-2000) and the Committee on Space Biology and Medicine (1994-2000). He also served as chair of the Committee on Health Risks from Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VII) (1996-1998). SSB Liaison Robert Cleland, Space Studies Board liaison, is professor emeritus of botany at the University of Washington. Dr. Cleland's research has focused on the mechanism of auxin action, cell extension, and gravitropism. Since moving to the Department of Botany at the University of Washington, Dr. Cleland has carried out sabbatical research at the Universities of Leeds and Edinburgh in the United Kingdom and at Yale University. He has been a president of the American Society of Plant Physiologists and is a fellow of the AAAS. Dr. Cleland served on NASA’s Life Science Advisory Committee and on the NRC Committee on Space Biology and Medicine. He is currently a member of the NRC Space Studies Board. NAPA Consultants David J. Pine, a retired senior executive with a 34-year career with the NASA, is a consultant to the National Academy of Public Administration, the joint participant in this study. While at NASA, Mr. Pine’s organizations in the Office of the Chief Financial Officer and later at the Langley Research Center were responsible for the conduct of major NASA program analysis and evaluation for the NASA administrator and deputy administrator. All major programs, including the International Space Station, were reviewed annually by his organization. In addition, he led NASA’s cost-estimating function. His organization provided NASA senior management with independent cost estimates and assessments of project costs to ensure cost realism in the development of NASA budgets. From early 1988 through the end of 1990, Mr. Pine was the deputy program manager for the Hubble Space Telescope and was responsible for telescope operations and the science support aspects of the program. Thomas E. Utsman, retired from NASA, is a consultant to the National Academy of Public Administration. While at NASA, Mr. Utsman served as the space shuttle program director, deputy director of the Office of Space Flight, deputy director of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and the director of Space Shuttle Operations at KSC. In these assignments he developed a clear programmatic and operational understanding of human spaceflight. Staff Sandra J. Graham received her Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from Duke University in 1990. Her past research focused primarily on topics in bioinorganic chemistry, such as the exchange mechanisms and reaction chemistry of biological metal complexes and their analogs. From 1990 to 1994 she held the position of senior scientist at the Bionetics Corporation, where she worked in the science branch of the Microgravity Science and Applications Division at NASA headquarters. Since 1994 Dr. Graham has been a senior program officer at the Space Studies Board of the National Research Council, where she has directed numerous studies in both space life sciences and microgravity sciences. Celeste Naylor joined the NRC and the Space Studies Board in June 2002 as a senior project assistant. She works primarily with the Committee on Microgravity Research and the Task Group on Research on the International Space Station. Ms. Naylor is a member of the Society of Government Meeting Professionals and has over 5 years of experience in event management.