APPENDIXES



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Eighth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering APPENDIXES

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Eighth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering This page in the original is blank.

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Eighth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering Contributors Marvin Lee Adams is a professor of nuclear engineering at Texas A&M University. Prior to joining the faculty there, he was a nuclear engineer with the Tennessee Valley Authority and a code physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He serves on numerous advisory committees and panels with the U.S. Department of Energy, and its laboratories, and has served on the United States-Russia Joint Technical Working Group on options for the disposition of weapons plutonium. Dr. Adams is a reviewer for several technical journals and serves on the editorial board of Transport Theory and Statistical Physics. He is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and the recipient of numerous awards, including Texas A&M University Faculty Fellow (2001) and Montague Center for Teaching Excellence Scholar (1995). He received a B.S. from Mississippi State University and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. from the University of Michigan, all in nuclear engineering. (mladams@tamu.edu) James P. Blanchard is a professor in the Engineering Physics Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW). His fields of interest are radiation damage, fusion technology, inertial fusion, reactor component lifetime, solid mechanics, and nuclear microbatteries. Dr. Blanchard is the recipient of the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award and the UW Chancellor’s Distinguished Teaching Award. He received a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1988. (blanchard@engr.wisc.edu) Mary Czerwinski is a research manager in the Large Display User Experience Group at Microsoft Research. Her group is responsible for studying and design

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Eighth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering ing advanced technology that leverages human capabilities across a wide variety of input and output channels. Dr. Czerwinski’s primary research areas include spatial cognition, multimodal user-interface design, and the intelligent design of notifications. She has been an affiliate assistant professor at the Department of Psychology, University of Washington since 1996. She has also held positions at Compaq Computer Corporation, Rice University, Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Corporation, and Bell Communications Research. Dr. Czerwinski received a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from Indiana University in Bloomington. She is active in the field of Human-Computer Interaction, publishing and participating in a wide number of conferences, professional venues, and journals. (marycz@microsoft.com) David Lee Davidson passed away suddenly on October 27, 2002. He was a fellow at Solutia, Inc., in Pensacola, Florida, where he was responsible for product and process development for fibers, polymers, and chemicals. He joined Monsanto/Solutia in 1992; prior to that, he held positions at Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Hercules, Inc., and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Dr. Davidson received a B.S. from the University of Delaware, an M.S. from the University of Massachusetts, and a Ph.D. from Princeton University, all in chemical engineering. Juan J. de Pablo is Howard Curler Distinguished Professor in the Chemical Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His fields of interest are molecular thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Dr. de Pablo was recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) Presidential Young Investigator Award, an NSF Presidential Early Career Award for Science and Engineering, and the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, among others. He received a B.S. from the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. (depablo@engr.wisc.edu) Thomas A. Dingus is director, Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, and Newport News Shipbuilding/Tenneco Professor, Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Prior to joining Virginia Tech, he was an associate director, University of Iowa Center for Computer-Aided Design, where he was responsible for the administration of the human factors research program associated with the Iowa Driving Simulator. He was also the founding director of the National Center for Advanced Transportation Technology at the University of Idaho. Dr. Dingus received a Ph.D. in industrial engineering and operations research from Virginia Tech (1987). Prior to attending graduate school, he spent one year as a research scientist at the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory Advanced Simulation Techniques Branch and four years as a human factors engineer and senior human factors engineer for Martin-Marietta Aerospace. He is the author of

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Eighth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering more than 120 scientific articles and technical reports. His research on intelligent-vehicle highway systems, driver attention demand, driver workload, advanced information display design, human factors, and safety has been supported by numerous companies and government agencies. Dr. Dingus has also been involved in the specification, design, and construction of numerous instrumented research vehicles, has conducted 12 major on-road instrumented vehicle studies, and has been involved in nine major driving-simulation studies. He is a member of the Intelligent Transportation Society of America, the American Society of Safety Engineers, and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. (tdingus@vtti.vt.edu) Peter S. Hastings is an engineering manager with Duke Energy in Charlotte, North Carolina. He has 20 years’ experience in engineering and management in the commercial nuclear industry, both in industry and with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As manager of licensing and safety analysis for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, he oversees implementation for the construction authorization and possession-and-use license for the facility and the Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA), and participated in the rule-making and development of regulatory guidance for the recent change to 10 CFR Part 70. Prior to his current assignment, he established and oversaw processes required for licensing the nation’s first high-level radioactive-waste repository and managed nuclear safety analyses and long-term performance assessment for that project. He established the National Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing and programmatic basis for the repository’s preclosure nuclear safety and accident analysis program and established DOE’s program for assessing long-term performance impacts during site characterization to meet NRC requirements. In addition, he has several years of experience in nuclear station operations, start-up testing, surveillance, and design engineering. Mr. Hastings received a B.S. in nuclear engineering from North Carolina State University. (pshastings@dukeengineering.com) Bruce E. Kane is a member of the research staff in the Department of Physics and Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has a B.A. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University. Dr. Kane, developer of the silicon-based quantum computer concept, began his research career as an experimentalist in 1987 in the Princeton laboratory of D. C. Tsui, winner of the 1998 Nobel Prize in physics. Since his arrival at the University of Maryland in 1999, Dr. Kane has devoted his attention to developing experimental methods for single spin detection using single electron transistors and scanned probe techniques on doped silicon devices. He hopes to demonstrate single spin detection and rudimentary quantum logic in these devices in the next few years. (bekane@umd.edu)

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Eighth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering John F. Kotek is affiliated with the Advanced Reactor Programs at Argonne National Laboratory-West. In December 2002, he completed a one-year congressional fellowship in the office of Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM), chairman, Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Mr. Kotek assisted Senator Bingaman on energy and national security-related issues and helped prepare the Senate’s comprehensive energy legislation. At Argonne, he managed Argonne-West’s participation in the Generation IV program, which focuses on the development of next-generation nuclear energy systems. Prior to joining Argonne, he spent nine years at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, where he held numerous positions, including, manager, university support programs; assistant manager, medical isotopes production project; chief of staff; associate director for management and administration; and associate director for technology. He received a B.S. in nuclear engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an M.B.A. from the University of Maryland. (john.kotek@anlw.anl.gov) Dietrich Leibfried is a research associate at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Colorado in Boulder, where he is coleader of a research project on quantum information processing with trapped Be+ ions. Prior to this, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Innsbruck, a guest researcher at NIST, and a staff scientist at the Max Planck Institute in Garching, Germany. Dr. Leibfried received an M.S. and Ph.D. in physics from the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität in Munich, Germany. He has received numerous awards, including the Helmholtz Award from the Federal Technical Institute (PTB) in Braunschweig, Germany, for a new determination of the Rydberg constant, and a START award from the Austrian Fonds zur Förderung der Wissenschaften, the highest award in Austria for junior researchers, for work in the field of quantum information. Dr. Leibfried is a member of the German Physical Society and the Optical Society of America, a reviewer for several journals, and the author of numerous articles published in Physics Today and Physikalische, the corresponding journal of the German Physical Society. (dil@boulder.nist.gov) Melody M. Moore is an assistant professor in the Computer Information Systems Department, College of Business Administration, Georgia State University (GSU). Her research interests are in the areas of brain-computer interfaces, software evolution, and user interface reengineering. For nine years prior to joining the GSU faculty, Dr. Moore was on the faculty of the College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, where she directed the Open Systems Laboratory and taught software engineering. Before entering academia, she worked for nine years in industry at Texas Instruments, Sperry, and National Semiconductor as a professional software engineer developing real-time embed

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Eighth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering ded systems, secure operating systems, networking, and compilers. She received a B.A. in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin (1980) and an M.S. in information and computer science and a Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia Institute of Technology. (melody@gsu.edu) Steven J. van Enk is a member of the technical staff at Bell Laboratories/Lucent Technologies in Murray Hill, New Jersey. Prior to assuming this position, he had postdoctoral fellowships at the Max-Planck Institute in Germany, the Theoretical Institute at the University of Innsbruck, and the California Institute of Technology. His research interests are in quantum communication and quantum information (physical implementation, quantum cryptography, teleportation) and quantum optics and QED (mechanical effects of light, angular momentum of light, and the Casimir effect). Dr. van Enk received an M.S. from the University of Utrecht and a Ph.D. from the University of Leiden in the Netherlands, both in physics. (vanenk@research.bell-labs.com) Kim J. Vicente is professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and founding director of the Cognitive Engineering Laboratory, University of Toronto. He also holds appointments in the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering and the Department of Computer Science, University of Toronto. In 2002-2003, he is Jerome Clarke Hunsaker Distinguished Visiting Professor of Aerospace Information Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Vicente received a B.A.Sc. in industrial engineering from the University of Toronto (1985), an M.S. in industrial engineering and operations research from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (1987), and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (1991). He has held positions at the Section for Informatics and Cognitive Science of the Risø National Laboratory in Roskilde, Denmark, and Georgia Institute of Technology. His interests include the design of interfaces for complex sociotechnical systems, the study of expertise, and the analysis and design of complex work environments. He is on the editorial boards of several journals and a member of the Committee for Human Factors of the National Research Council/The National Academies. He has applied his extensive research on cognitive work analysis and human-computer interface design for complex sociotechnical systems to a number of diverse domains, including animation, aviation, engineering design, medicine, network management, nuclear power, and petrochemical processes. Dr. Vicente is the author of Cognitive Work Analysis: Toward Safe, Productive, and Healthy Computer-based Work (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1999), the first textbook in the area of cognitive work analysis. In 1999, he was one of the 25 Canadians under the age of 40 chosen by Time Magazine as “Leaders for the 21st century who will shape Canada’s future.” (vicente@mie.utoronto.ca)

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Eighth Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering Andrew J. Viterbi is president of the Viterbi Group, LLC, which advises and invests in start-up companies, predominantly in the wireless communications and network infrastructure fields. In July 1985, Dr. Viterbi cofounded QUAL-COMM, Inc., a developer and manufacturer of mobile satellite communications and digital wireless telephony; he was chief technical officer until 1996, and vice chairman of the company until 2000. Previously, in 1968, Dr. Viterbi cofounded LINKABIT Corporation, a digital communications company; he was executive vice president and president in the early 1980s. From 1963 to 1973, Dr. Viterbi was professor, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California, Los Angeles, where he conducted fundamental work in digital communication theory and wrote numerous research papers and two books. He continued teaching on a part-time basis at the University of California, San Diego, until 1994, and is currently professor emeritus. From 1957 to 1963, Dr. Viterbi was a member of the Communications Research Section of the California Institute of Technology Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Dr. Viterbi received a B.S. and M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1957, and a Ph.D. from the University of Southern California in 1962. He has received numerous awards and international recognition for his leadership and substantial contributions to communications theory and its industrial applications over the years. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Marconi Fellow, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. All four international standards for digital cellular telephony use the Viterbi algorithm for interference suppression, as do most digital satellite communication systems, both for business applications and for direct satellite broadcast to residences. (andrew.viterbi@viterbigroup.com) John M. Vohs is the Carl V.S. Patterson Professor and chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He joined the faculty there after receiving a B.S. degree from the University of Illinois and a Ph.D. from the University of Delaware. Dr. Vohs’ research interest is in the field of surface and interfacial science, particularly the relationships between the local atomic structure of surfaces and their chemical reactivity. His work on structure-activity relationships for metal-oxide catalysts, especially those used for selective oxidation reactions and automotive emissions control systems, is widely known. In recent years, he has collaborated in the development of solid-oxide fuel cells that run on readily available hydrocarbon fuels, such as natural gas and diesel. Dr. Vohs has received numerous honors, including an NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award and two Union Carbide Research Innovation Awards. (vohs@seas.upenn.edu)