Appendix C
STEERING COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Cary I. Sneider (Chair) is currently vice president for programs at the Museum of Science in Boston, where he is responsible for live programming that serves approximately 1.7 million visitors each year. He currently serves as principal investigator on grants from NASA and the National Science Foundation, aimed at increasing public understanding of what scientists and engineers do and at strengthening relationships between science centers and schools. Prior to assuming that position, he was the director of astronomy and physics education at the Lawrence Hall of Science, directing state and federal grants, developing new instructional materials, and designing and presenting a wide variety of professional development experiences for teachers. He has conducted research on how to help students unravel their misconceptions in science, and has explored new ways to link science centers and schools to promote student inquiry. He earned his B.A. cum laude in astronomy from Harvard and his Ph.D. in education from the University of California at Berkeley. Sneider served on the National Research Council’s Working Group on Science Content Standards for the National Science Education Standards, and in 1997, was awarded National Science Teachers Association Citation for Distinguished Informal Science Education. He has been a member of the Committee on Science Education K-12 since 1999.

Ronald D. Anderson is a professor of science education at the University of Colorado. His research interests have centered on science education reform and science teacher education. In the early 1980s, he directed an NSF-funded project that produced a meta-analysis of approximately 700 quantitative science education studies. He co-authored Local Leadership for Science Education Reform and, in the 1990s, also conducted a national study of curriculum reform in science and mathematics education with funding from the U.S. Department of Education, the results of which were published as Study of Curriculum Reform. Anderson has conducted evaluations of many local, state, and national educational programs, including NSF-funded projects. He served as chair of the evaluation subcommittee for reviewing the National Science Education Standards for the National Academy of Sciences prior to its publication. In addition to



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Appendix C STEERING COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES Cary I. Sneider (Chair) is currently vice president for programs at the Museum of Science in Boston, where he is responsible for live programming that serves approximately 1.7 million visitors each year. He currently serves as principal investigator on grants from NASA and the National Science Foundation, aimed at increasing public understanding of what scientists and engineers do and at strengthening relationships between science centers and schools. Prior to assuming that position, he was the director of astronomy and physics education at the Lawrence Hall of Science, directing state and federal grants, developing new instructional materials, and designing and presenting a wide variety of professional development experiences for teachers. He has conducted research on how to help students unravel their misconceptions in science, and has explored new ways to link science centers and schools to promote student inquiry. He earned his B.A. cum laude in astronomy from Harvard and his Ph.D. in education from the University of California at Berkeley. Sneider served on the National Research Council’s Working Group on Science Content Standards for the National Science Education Standards, and in 1997, was awarded National Science Teachers Association Citation for Distinguished Informal Science Education. He has been a member of the Committee on Science Education K-12 since 1999. Ronald D. Anderson is a professor of science education at the University of Colorado. His research interests have centered on science education reform and science teacher education. In the early 1980s, he directed an NSF-funded project that produced a meta-analysis of approximately 700 quantitative science education studies. He co-authored Local Leadership for Science Education Reform and, in the 1990s, also conducted a national study of curriculum reform in science and mathematics education with funding from the U.S. Department of Education, the results of which were published as Study of Curriculum Reform. Anderson has conducted evaluations of many local, state, and national educational programs, including NSF-funded projects. He served as chair of the evaluation subcommittee for reviewing the National Science Education Standards for the National Academy of Sciences prior to its publication. In addition to

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writing reviews of the research on science teacher education, he has engaged in several experimental projects to foster new approaches to science teacher education at the University of Colorado. Anderson has a B.S. in physics and a Ph.D. in education from the University of Wisconsin. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as well as a former chair of its education section. Other former offices include president of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching and president of the Association for the Education of Teachers of Science. He served as a program officer at the National Science Foundation and currently is a member of the Advisory Board for the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education. Rolf Blank is director of education indicators at the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO). He has been a senior staff member at CCSSO for 16 years. He is responsible for developing, managing, and reporting a system of state-by-state and national indicators of the condition and quality of education in K-12 public schools. Blank is currently directing a three-year experimental design study on Improving Effectiveness of Instruction in Mathematics and Science with Data on Enacted Curriculum, which is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation. He recently completed a three-year project in collaboration with the Wisconsin Center for Education Research to develop, demonstrate, and test a set of survey and reporting tools for analyzing instructional content and pedagogy in science and math. At CCSSO, Blank collaborates with state education leaders, researchers, and professional organizations in directing program evaluation studies and technical assistance projects aimed toward improving the quality of K-12 public education. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology and education from Florida State University and an M.A. in education policy studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Enriqueta Bond is president of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and a member of the NRC Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), with expertise in public policy and private foundations. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has extensive experience serving on committees for the National Research Council. Bond received her undergraduate degree in zoology and physiology from Wellesley College, master’s degree in biology and genetics from the University of Virginia, and Ph.D. in molecular biology and biochemical genetics from Georgetown University. She is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Society for Microbiology, and American Public Health Association. She serves on the Council of the Institute of Medicine and chairs the IOM Clinical Research Roundtable, the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Center for Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control, and the Board of the North Carolina Biotechnology Center. Bond was executive officer of the Institute of Medicine from 1989 to 1994. She became president of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund in July 1994. James J. Gallagher is a professor of science education at Michigan State University. His interests include education of prospective and practicing teachers of science at the middle-

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school and high-school levels. His areas of expertise are research on teaching, learning, and assessment with emphasis on understanding and application of science. He is also involved in professional development and assessment projects in South Africa, Thailand, Vietnam, Taiwan, and Australia. Much of this work has dealt with educational solutions to local and regional environmental and social problems. He co-directs two projects funded by NSF—a national study of leadership in science and mathematics education and a professional development program for middle- and high-school science teachers using findings from long-term ecological research studies. From 1998 to 2001, he was co-editor of the Journal of Research in Science Teaching. He was a member of the writing team for the Teaching Standards component of the National Science Education Standards. In 1999, Gallagher was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the National Association for Research in Science Teaching. He also is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Gallagher earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Colgate University, a master’s degree from Antioch College, and an Ed.D. from Harvard University. He also engaged in a two-year post-doctoral fellowship at Stanford University. Brian Stecher is a senior social scientist in the education program at RAND. Stecher’s research focuses on the development, implementation, quality, and impact of educational assessment and curriculum reforms. He is currently co-principal investigator for a statewide evaluation of the California Class Size Reduction program, and he received a field-initiated studies grant from the U.S. Department of Education to study the effects of class size on students’ opportunities to learn. Stecher led recent RAND studies of the effects of new state assessment systems on classroom practices in Vermont, Kentucky, and Washington State, funded by the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards and Student Testing (CRESST). He is a member of the RAND team conducting a study for the National Science Foundation of the relationship between mathematics and science teaching reforms and student achievement. This same team recently completed a study of the use of performance-based assessments in large-scale testing programs, a study that examined the cost, technical quality, feasibility, and acceptability of performance-based assessments. In the past, Stecher has directed research to develop and validate national educational indicators and professional licensing and certification tests. He earned his B.A. cum laude in mathematics from Pomona College and his Ph.D. in education from the University of California at Los Angeles.