About the Authors

BRUCE A.RIDEOUT, Chair, serves as Associate Director of Conservation and Science and Head of Pathology of the Zoological Society of San Diego, where he has been working as a pathologist since 1991. In addition, he has been an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at San Diego State University since 1992, and is a member of the University of California at Davis Veterinary Advisory Board. Dr. Rideout has served as Pathology Consultant and Advisor to numerous animal studies, including Chair of the Pathology Working Group of the 1998 Johne’s Disease Workshop. Prior to his work at the San Diego Zoo, he was a Resident in the Department of Pathology at the National Zoo in Washington, DC, and in the Department of Pathology of the School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis. He has previous experience with the National Research Council (NRC), having served on the Committee on the Scientific Bases for the Preservation of the Mariana Crow in 1996. Dr. Rideout earned his B.S. in veterinary science with highest honors in 1985, his D.V.M. in 1986, and a Ph.D. in comparative pathology in 1991, all from the University of California, Davis.

SHELDON T.BROWN has been Chief of the Infectious Disease Section at the Bronx Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center since 1997 and is Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine of New York University. He also has served as Infectious Disease Consultant to the Department of Medicine at the Veterans Affairs Hudson Valley Health Care



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About the Authors BRUCE A.RIDEOUT, Chair, serves as Associate Director of Conservation and Science and Head of Pathology of the Zoological Society of San Diego, where he has been working as a pathologist since 1991. In addition, he has been an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at San Diego State University since 1992, and is a member of the University of California at Davis Veterinary Advisory Board. Dr. Rideout has served as Pathology Consultant and Advisor to numerous animal studies, including Chair of the Pathology Working Group of the 1998 Johne’s Disease Workshop. Prior to his work at the San Diego Zoo, he was a Resident in the Department of Pathology at the National Zoo in Washington, DC, and in the Department of Pathology of the School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis. He has previous experience with the National Research Council (NRC), having served on the Committee on the Scientific Bases for the Preservation of the Mariana Crow in 1996. Dr. Rideout earned his B.S. in veterinary science with highest honors in 1985, his D.V.M. in 1986, and a Ph.D. in comparative pathology in 1991, all from the University of California, Davis. SHELDON T.BROWN has been Chief of the Infectious Disease Section at the Bronx Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center since 1997 and is Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at the Mt. Sinai School of Medicine of New York University. He also has served as Infectious Disease Consultant to the Department of Medicine at the Veterans Affairs Hudson Valley Health Care

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Center since 1996. Dr. Brown is experienced in the conduct of clinical trials, having been co-investigator on numerous multi-center trials and site Principle Investigator on seven clinical trials for treatment of HIV and opportunistic infections, and has participated in studies investigating the relationship between M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and Crohn’s Disease. His laboratory interests focus upon investigations of mycobacterial infections, including M. tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacteria. He has particular expertise in atypical mycobacterial infections of the immunocompromised host. Dr. Brown has been a Diplomate of the National Board of Medical Examiners since 1984, and of the American Board of Internal Medicine since 1987, and was certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in the Subspecialty in Infectious Disease in 1990. He received the Meritorious Service Award from the Bronx Veterans’ Affairs Medical Program in 1997. Dr. Brown graduated with a B.A. from Antioch College in 1974, received a Premedical Certificate from the Columbia University School of General Studies in 1980, and was awarded an M.D. with honors from New York University School of Medicine in 1984. WILLIAM C.DAVIS is a Professor in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology at Washington State University, where he has been on faculty since 1968. His expertise is the cellular immunology of animals, and has almost 300 journal publications on a broad range of topics in this field. Dr. Davis’s work on Johne’s disease has involved cellular immune responses during infection by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. He is a member of the American Society for Investigative Pathology, the Transplantation Society, the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, and the American Association of Veterinary Immunologists, by whom he was selected Distinguished Veterinary Immunologist in 1993. In the same year, Dr. Davis was honored during the Bicentennial Celebration of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Madrid, Spain as Bicentennial Professor. Dr. Davis has had previous experience with the NRC, having served on the Subcommittee on Animal Sciences of the Committee on Bioscience Research in Agriculture from 1984 to 1985. Dr. Davis earned a B.A. in biology from Chico State College in 1955, and his M.A. in biology and Ph.D. in medical microbiology transplantation immunology from Stanford University in 1959 and 1967, respectively. JOHN M.GAY is currently an associate professor in the Field Disease Investigation Unit of the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University. Previous positions include Assistant Professor at the Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center of the University of California at Davis and Large Animal Clinical Sciences Resident at the University of Minnesota. He has spent over five years in private practice with beef and dairy cattle. He is also board certified by the American

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College of Epidemiology and the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine. Dr. Gay’s research interests include the clinical epidemiology and diagnostics of Johne’s disease in cattle. His work with Johne’s disease combines applied epidemiology and laboratory research (helping practitioners understand and implement herd control plans to break the transmission cycle, as well as evaluating the associations between ELISA titers at dryoff and subsequent herd performance). Dr. Gay’s experience with animal production and health extends to his childhood on his family’s 1,400-head commercial cow-calf ranch in eastern Montana. Dr. Gay earned his B.S. in mechanical engineering in 1973 from the University of Washington, his D.V.M. in 1978 from Washington State University, and his Ph.D. in veterinary science in 1988 from the University of Minnesota. RALPH A.GIANNELLA has been on the faculty and has been serving as Director of the Division of Digestive Diseases at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine since 1980. He is also a Staff Physician at the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Cincinnati and an attending physician at the University of Cincinnati Hospital. He has authored over two hundred journal articles, books, abstracts, chapters, and letters on a broad range of topics in his field, and is on the editorial board of the Edizione Minerva Medica (Italy), GastroHep.com (UK), Revista Espanola Enfermedades Digestivas (Spain), and Gastroenterologia Integrada (Spain). Additionally, Dr. Giannella serves on the Board of Directors for the Foundation for Digestive Health and Nutrition, and the American Gastroenterological Association Foundation. Dr. Giannella is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, a member of the American Society of Microbiology, a member and former President of the American Gastroenterological Association, and has served on the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America’s Research Training Awards Committee. Dr. Giannella has been elected to membership in the Central Society for Clinical Investigation, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Association of American Physicians, among other organizations. He is also a Diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Gastroenterology. Dr. Giannella earned his A.B. from Cornell University in 1961, and his M.D. from the Albany Medical College in 1965. MURRAY E.HINES II is an Associate Professor at the Veterinary Diagnostic and Investigational Laboratory of the Department of Veterinary Pathology at the University of Georgia’s College of Veterinary Medicine. His research has involved ruminant paratuberculosis and swine mycobacteriosis (tuberculosis) including evaluation of virulence factors, vaccine efficacy, cytokine expression, diagnostic tests and control methods. He is also Chief of the Necropsy, Immunohistochemical Staining, and Pathology Research Resources Sections. He has been a section moderator at two Colloquia of the International Association for Paratuberculosis and Other Intestinal Mycobacterioses (1991

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and 1996) and at the American Association of Laboratory Animal Veterinarians in 1993. He is licensed in Tennessee and Georgia and is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. Prior to assuming his position at the University of Georgia, Dr. Hines was an Assistant Research Professor at the University of Miami, School of Medicine, and was in private practice for seven years. He received his D.V.M. from the University of Tennessee in 1980 and his Ph.D. in veterinary pathology from Louisiana State University in 1991. WILLIAM D.HUESTON currently serves as Professor and Director of the Center for Animal Health and Food Safety in the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Minnesota, and adjunct Professor of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health. Previously, he was Associate Dean and Professor of the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine in College Park, Maryland. Before joining the Regional College faculty, Dr. Hueston was Director of the Operational Support Staff and Director of the Center for Animal Health Monitoring of the Centers for Epidemiology and Animal Health at USDA/APHIS, where he designed, implemented, and managed a national system for monitoring animal health in the United States. During his tenure at USDA, he also held an adjunct faculty position at Colorado State University. Prior to USDA, Dr. Hueston was a faculty member at the Ohio State University. He was also an industry and clinical veterinarian for four years, and is the author and co-author of numerous refereed journal publications. He is board certified with an epidemiology specialty by the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine, and is a Diplomate in the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine. Dr. Hueston received his B.A. in biology from University of Virginia, and his M.S. in preventive medicine, D.V.M., and Ph.D. from the Ohio State University. LAWRENCE J.HUTCHINSON brings 25 years of applied research, extension services, and producer education activities to this study. His work on Johne’s disease has led to a better understanding of its epidemiology, transmission, diagnostic detection, and control. Dr. Hutchinson has conducted field studies that have involved beef packing plants, dairy herds, and diagnostic test development, and which have led to a comprehensive risk assessment tool for Johne’s disease, as well as programs for control and test-negative status recognition. He is currently a Professor of Veterinary Science and Extension Veterinarian at the Pennsylvania State University, where he has been on faculty since 1976. Prior to his academic appointment, Dr. Hutchinson was in general and large animal veterinary practice in Vermont, New York, and Pennsylvania for fourteen years. He has a significant number of publications and research grants on the subject of Johne’s disease and has developed many new courses, extension programs, and other educational materials. He is also a member of numerous professional organizations, such as the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Pennsylvania Dairy Sanitarians, the U.S. Animal Health

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Association, and the National Extension Dairy Quality Assurance Committee, and is immediate past president and a member of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners. Dr. Hutchinson has also been selected as the Extension Veterinarian of the Year by the American Association of Extension Veterinarians, and the Pennsylvania Veterinarian of the Year by the Pennsylvania Veterinary Medical Association. Dr. Hutchinson received a B.S. in pre-veterinary studies in 1959 from the Pennsylvania State University, and his D.V.M. from New York State Veterinary College in 1962.