Appendixes



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Appendixes

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Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies Rear Admiral Paul E. Tobin (U.S. Navy, ret.) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy (1963) and received his M.S. degree in computer systems management from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1970. His career in the Navy spanned 35 years, during which he commanded the USS TATTNAL (DDG-19), the USS FOX (CG-33), and the Surface Warfare Officer School. RADM Tobin’s final posting was as the Oceanographer of the Navy. His professional interests include shipboard engineering, computer systems, training and education, and oceanography. After retiring in 1998, RADM Tobin became the Executive Director of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association and is currently a member of the Ocean Studies Board. Thomas P. Ackerman received his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Washington (1976). Currently, he is a Battelle Fellow at the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. His research interests are atmospheric radioactive transfer, planetary radiation budget, climatic effects of clouds and aerosols, aircraft and satellite observations of radiation fields, and ground-based remote sensing of cloud properties. Dr. Ackerman served on the NRC Advisory Panel for the International Satellite Climatology Project. Arthur B. Baggeroer received his Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1968). He is presently a professor in MIT’s Department of Ocean and Electrical Engineering. Dr. Baggeroer’s research interests include sonar signal processing as applied to oceanographic research. A member of NAE, he has served on a number of NRC boards and committees, including the Ocean

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Studies Board, the Naval Studies Board, and the Committee on Mine Warfare Assessment. E. Ann Berman received her Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Wisconsin (1974). Dr. Berman supports the Navy in the area of operational concept development for emerging remote sensing systems. Currently, Dr. Berman is the President of Tri-Space, Inc., a remote sensing and software engineering company serving a broad range of environmental and security interests. Formerly, Dr. Berman served on several NRC committees, including the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and the Steering Committee on Improving the Differential Global Positioning System Infrastructure for Earth and Atmospheric Science Applications. Stephen K. Boss received his Ph.D. in Marine Sciences from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (1994). Currently, he is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geosciences and Director of the Environmental Dynamics Program at the University of Arkansas. His research interests are in the application of high-resolution geophysical methods to document and interpret the depositional geometry, stratigraphy, and regional geological history of sedimentary basins, continental margins, carbonate platforms, and lakes. Dr. Boss attended the Steering Committee for the Fifth and Sixth Symposiums on Tactical Oceanography and acted as a reviewer for both reports. Tony F. Clark received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina (1974). He has been a professor in the Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences Department at North Carolina State University since 1996. Dr. Clark’s research interests include underwater acoustics, oceanography, and marine geology and geophysics. A former naval officer with experience in submarine warfare and naval oceanography, he served on the NRC Steering Committee for the Symposium on Oceanography and Mine Warfare. Peter C. Cornillon received his Ph.D. in Experimental High Energy Physics from Cornell University (1973). Currently, Dr. Cornillon is a Professor of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Cornillon’s current research interests include mesoscale dynamics of the upper ocean. Using satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST), wind vector, and sea surface heights (SSH) fields in conjunction with in situ data and numerical model results, he is investigating Gulf Stream dynamics, Rossby wave forcing and propagation, and the characterization of SST fronts on regional (western North Atlantic) and global scales. Dr. Cornillon also teaches a graduate course on geophysical fluid dynamics. Carl A. Friehe received his Ph.D. from Stanford University (1968). Currently, Dr. Friehe is a professor at the Atmospheric Turbulence Laboratory at the Uni-

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versity of California, Irvine. Dr. Friehe’s research interests include turbulence in the atmosphere, particularly that responsible for energy exchanges between the earth’s land and ocean surfaces and the overlying atmosphere. He was a member of the Ocean Studies Board and served on several NRC committees, including the Marine Meteorology Study Panel, the Panel on Coastal Meteorology, and the Panel on the NOAA Coastal Ocean Program. Eileen E. Hofmann received her Ph.D. in Marine Sciences and Engineering from North Carolina State University (1980). Currently, Dr. Hofmann is a Professor at the Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography at Old Dominion University. Dr. Hofmann’s research interests include mathematical modeling of physical-biological interactions in marine food webs. Dr. Hoffman was a member of the Ocean Studies Board and has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Coastal Oceans and the Committee on Ecosystem Management for Sustainable Marine Fisheries. Robert A. Holman received his Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography from Dalhousie University (1979). Currently, he is a Professor in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. Dr. Holman’s interests include but are not limited to measurement of nearshore waves and currents, application of remote sensing to nearshore processes and large-scale coastal behavior. Formerly, Dr. Holman served on several NRC committees, including the Steering Committee for the Sixth Symposium on Tactical Oceanography and the Steering Committee for the Symposium on Oceanography and Naval Special Warfare. Gail C. Kineke received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington (1993). Currently, Dr. Kineke is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at Boston College. Dr. Kineke’s research interests pertain to sediment transport in coastal environments and are aimed at understanding how physical processes associated with rivers, waves, tides, and currents move sediment, transform the coasts, and deposit sediment in the marine environment. John M. Ruddy received his Ph.D. in electrophysics from Polytechnic University (1967). Currently, Dr. Ruddy is the Technical Director and Deputy for System Development of the Ground-Based Missile Defense Program of the Missile Defense Agency, Department of Defense, Washington, D.C. Formerly, Dr. Ruddy was Vice President for the MITRE Corporation. STAFF Dan Walker is a senior program officer with the Ocean Studies Board, where he has been since July 1995. Since 1999, Dr. Walker has held a joint appointment as a Guest Investigator at the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceano-

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graphic Institution. He received his Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Tennessee in 1990. Since joining the Ocean Studies Board, he directed a number of studies including Oil in the Sea III: Inputs, Fates and Effects (2002), Clean Coastal Waters: Understanding and Reducing the Effects of Nutrient Pollution (2000), Science for Decisionmaking: Coastal and Marine Geology at the U.S. Geological Survey (1999), Global Ocean Sciences: Toward an Integrated Approach (1998), and The Global Ocean Observing System: Users, Benefits, and Priorities (1997). A former member of both the Kentucky and North Carolina State geological surveys, Dr. Walker’s interests focus on the value of environmental information for policymaking at local, state, and national levels. John Dandelski is a Research Associate with the Ocean Studies Board and received his M.A. in marine Affairs and policy from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami. His research focused on commercial fisheries’ impacts to the benthic communities of Biscayne Bay. As a graduate research intern at the Congressional Research Service he worked on fisheries and ocean health issues. Mr. Dandelski served as the RSMAS Assistant Diving Safety Officer and was involved in fisheries, coral, underwater archaeology, and ocean exploration projects. Denise Greene has eight years of experience working for the National Academies and is currently a senior project assistant for the Ocean Studies Board.