APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee and Panel Members

COMMITTEE ON MATERIALS RESEARCH FOR DEFENSE AFTER NEXT

Harvey Schadler, chair (NAE), is a retired technical director of the General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center. He was elected to the NAE for exceptional leadership in the development and application of advanced materials and processes in the electrical and aircraft engine industries. His expertise is in the physical properties and processes of manufacture of magnetic, superconducting, high-temperature, and nuclear metallic and ceramic materials. His expertise includes aerospace and Army systems.

Alan Lovelace, vice chair (NAE), is a retired senior corporate vice president and chairman of Commercial Launch Services, General Dynamics Corporation. His expertise includes aerospace and defense systems and materials. He was elected to the NAE for his contributions to aerospace materials, particularly the application of boron- and graphite-reinforced epoxy composites.

James Baskerville is vice president for surface ship support and for advanced technology at Bath Iron Works (General Dynamics). His expertise is in Navy systems and materials. He joined Bath Iron Works in 1997 after serving more than 25 years in the U.S. Navy. He is a registered professional engineer with extensive experience in the development and use of marine composites.



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APPENDIX B Biographical Sketches of Committee and Panel Members COMMITTEE ON MATERIALS RESEARCH FOR DEFENSE AFTER NEXT Harvey Schadler, chair (NAE), is a retired technical director of the General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center. He was elected to the NAE for exceptional leadership in the development and application of advanced materials and processes in the electrical and aircraft engine industries. His expertise is in the physical properties and processes of manufacture of magnetic, superconducting, high-temperature, and nuclear metallic and ceramic materials. His expertise includes aerospace and Army systems. Alan Lovelace, vice chair (NAE), is a retired senior corporate vice president and chairman of Commercial Launch Services, General Dynamics Corporation. His expertise includes aerospace and defense systems and materials. He was elected to the NAE for his contributions to aerospace materials, particularly the application of boron- and graphite-reinforced epoxy composites. James Baskerville is vice president for surface ship support and for advanced technology at Bath Iron Works (General Dynamics). His expertise is in Navy systems and materials. He joined Bath Iron Works in 1997 after serving more than 25 years in the U.S. Navy. He is a registered professional engineer with extensive experience in the development and use of marine composites.

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Federico Capasso (NAS, NAE) is vice president of the Physical Research Laboratory, Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies. His expertise is in the area of electronic materials. He pioneered the use of bandgap engineering as a powerful tool in the design of semiconductor devices and heterostructures and made related seminal contributions to electronics, photonics, and semiconductor science in the areas of detectors, lasers, transistors, quantum devices and circuits, and artificial structures with new transport and optical properties. Millard Firebaugh (NAE), a retired U.S. Navy rear admiral, is vice president of innovation and chief engineer for the Electric Boat Corporation (General Dynamics). His expertise is in naval systems and materials, submarine design, and naval architecture. John Gassner is director of the Supporting Science and Technology Directorate and chief scientist of the U.S. Army’s Natick Soldier Center. His expertise is in polymer science and engineering, composites development, manufacturing processes, and Army systems. His research has included work on high-performance polymers, nanomaterials, self-assembly, sensors and smart structures, advanced materials for energy attenuation, and innovative processing techniques for organic materials. Michael Jaffe is a faculty member at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers University. He is chief scientist for applied programs and director of the Medical Device Concept Laboratory of the New Jersey Center for Biomaterials and Medical Devices, Rutgers. His expertise is in innovative materials research areas, such as biomimetics, the structure-property relationships of polymers and related materials, the application of biological paradigms to materials design, and the translation of new technologies to commercial reality. Frank Karasz (NAE) is Silvio O. Conte Distinguished Professor, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts. His research activities are concentrated in polymer physics and chemistry: polymer-polymer interactions in binary amorphous and amorphous crystalline blend systems; effects of copolymerization and microstructure; nuclear magnetic resonance studies of polymer solid state, especially blends; computer simulations of polymer-polymer miscibility; quasi-elastic

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light scattering from macromolecular solutions; electronic and optical properties of conducting polymers; and polyimide systems. Harry A. Lipsitt is professor emeritus in the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Wright State University. His expertise is in intermetallics and metals. He spent 30 years at the Air Force Wright Laboratories working on the development and optimization of metallic and intermetallic materials for use in high-temperature applications. Meyya Meyyappan is director of the Center for Nanotechnology at the NASA Ames Research Center. His expertise is in nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and sensor materials, and electronic materials. At NASA, he is responsible for basic research in nanotechnology, computational semiconductor device physics, computational and experimental chemistry in materials processing, and process/equipment modeling. George Peterson is a retired director of the Materials Laboratory at the U.S. Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories. His expertise is in the properties and processing of structural polymer composites, manufacturing technologies, and aerospace systems. Under his direction, the Air Force focused its efforts on developing low-cost production processes for electronics, nonmetallics, and metallics. Julia M. Phillips is director of the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Her expertise is in electronic materials, materials characterization, and computational materials science. Her accomplishments have been in the areas of epitaxial metallic and insulating films on semiconductors; high-temperature superconducting, ferroelectric, and magnetic oxide thin films; and novel transparent conducing materials. Richard Tressler is professor emeritus of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Pennsylvania State University. His expertise is in the properties and processing of structural ceramics and ceramic composites, as well as Army and aerospace systems. His research interests include the fabrication and mechanical behavior of structural ceramics, ceramic composites, fracture and strengthening mechanisms, and the correlation of processing with ceramic properties.

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PANEL ON STRUCTURAL AND MULTIFUNCTIONAL MATERIALS Harry A. Lipsitt, chair (see committee biographical sketch). Millard Firebaugh (NAE), vice chair (see committee biographical sketch). Michael I. Baskes is a staff member at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the Structure/Property Relations Group. His interests encompass the use of computational methods to investigate material properties such as alloy phase stability, magnetic behavior, fracture toughness, empirical and semi-empirical potential development for metals and semiconductors, diffusion and trapping of hydrogen isotopes, interfaces and grain boundaries, atomistic calculations of dislocations in metals, brittle and ductile fracture, and microsegregation in welding. He established the journal Modeling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering in 1992, and has been its editor-in-chief since its inception. L. Catherine Brinson is an associate professor in mechanical engineering, Northwestern University. Her research interests include constitutive modeling of shape memory alloys and mechanical behavior of other smart materials; research on time dependence of polymeric properties at scales ranging from the nanoscale; microscale interlayer effects; macroscopic thermomechanical response; and recently microporous metallic alloys with emphasis on biological applications. Research projects often focus on environmental effects on material behavior, such as material aging and coupled temperature and mechanical response. Thomas W. Eagar (NAE) is the Thomas Lord Professor of Materials Engineering and Engineering Systems, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has made many contributions to the theory and practice of welding. At MIT he has also served as director of the Materials Processing Center and codirector of the Leaders for Manufacturing Program. He has served on technical committees for U.S. governmental departments and agencies and has held numerous officer positions in many professional associations. Richard J. Farris is Distinguished University Professor, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts. His research has had a pronounced effect on how polymer properties are

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determined and modeled. His teaching and research have focused on development of a fundamental understanding of the physical and mechanical behavior of polymeric materials using the classical continuum methods of experimental mechanics, physics, and thermodynamics. His research group is recognized as the source of many unique instruments and characterization techniques for probing important but difficult-to-measure phenomena. He specializes in exploring the behavior of solid polymers and composites, with a strong emphasis on fibers and coatings. D. David Newlin is director of vehicle survivability technologies, General Dynamics Land Systems. He is responsible for detection avoidance, hit avoidance, penetration avoidance, and kill avoidance technologies, including armor, signature management, and advanced materials and structures. He previously served 26 years in the Army in a variety of positions, including product manager for the common chassis and project manager for ground system integration, which worked on ground vehicle survivability technology investment. George Peterson (see committee biographical sketch). Richard Tressler (see committee biographical sketch). PANEL ON ENERGY AND POWER MATERIALS John Gassner, co-chair (see committee biographical sketch). James Baskerville, co-chair (see committee biographical sketch). Daniel H. Doughty is manager of the Lithium Battery Research and Development Department at the Sandia National Laboratories. The department is responsible for developing advanced power sources, typically batteries and electrochemical cells based on lithium. It also works on leading edge electrochemistry as well as advanced batteries and battery materials for defense and commercial applications. Dr. Doughty previously worked as a research chemist for 3M Co. developing advanced inorganic photoconductors. His areas of expertise include lithium chemistries (e.g., lithium ion rechargeable batteries and lithium thionyl chloride cells and batteries) and general materials chemistry and processing, including

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colloid chemistry, superconducting ceramics, intercalation compounds, and oxide surface chemistry. Sossina M. Haile is associate professor of materials science, California Institute of Technology. Her research centers on ionic conduction in solids, with the twin objectives of understanding the mechanisms that govern ion transport and applying that understanding to development of advanced solid electrolytes and novel solid-state electrochemical devices. Technological applications of fast ion conductors include batteries, sensors, ion pumps, and fuel cells. It is in this last area that Dr. Haile’s work is expected to have the most impact. Robert N. Katz is the Norton Research Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, and the principal of R. Nathan Katz Associates. He was chief technologist at the Army Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, at Watertown, Massachusetts, from 1987 through 1995 and was chief of the Ceramics Research Division there from 1970 through 1987. He is an internationally recognized expert in advanced ceramics and ceramic composites and their application in areas of both military and civilian importance, including ceramic composite armor, missile guidance transparencies, cutting tools, bearings, and most especially heat engines. His research interests include structure/property relationships at high temperature in high-performance ceramics, high strain rate properties of ceramics, tensile testing of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites, design with brittle materials, and technology assessment. PANEL ON ELECTRONIC AND PHOTONIC MATERIALS Julia M. Phillips, co-chair (see committee biographical sketch). Meyya Meyyappan, co-chair (see committee biographical sketch). Harold G. Craighead is Charles W. Lake Professor of Engineering and Interim Dean of the College of Engineering at Cornell University. His research centers on the new science and applications of nanometer-scale devices and structures with special attention to nanofabrication processes and their impact on the properties of materials and devices. He is also working to advance understanding and manipulation of the physical properties of systems of reduced dimensions. Current research topics

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include high-resolution electron-beam processes and the physics of ultrasmall structures. He is investigating application of these in the fields of optics, magnetism, and biology. Narsingh B. Singh is manager of crystal science and technology at Northrop Grumman Corporation. His expertise is in crystal growth of optoelectronic materials and materials for novel electro-optical devices. His research interests include materials for nonlinear optical, acousto-optical, and x-ray and gamma-ray detector applications and single crystals grown by the physical vapor transport, solution growth, and Bridgman crystal growth methods. He has also studied electronic and photonic materials for lasers, acousto-optic-based sensors, RF materials by LPE for frequency controls, dielectric materials for phase shifters, periodically poled thick films for mid-IR lasers, and AlN substrates for GaN epitaxy. Ming C. Wu is a professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, and director, MURI Center on RF Photonic Materials and Devices, at the University of California at Los Angeles. His expertise is in micromachined microoptics, optical microelectromechanical systems, free-space integrated optics, high-speed optoelectronics, microwave photonics, high-power photodetectors, and mode-locked semiconductor lasers. He has also studied high-speed semiconductor lasers and optoelectronics. Edward Zellers is a professor in the Departments of Environmental Health Sciences and Chemistry and group leader in the NSF Engineering Research Center for Wireless Integrated MicroSystems, University of Michigan. His areas of expertise include the design and implementation of microfabricated chemical sensors and sensor arrays for measurement of small organic molecules; novel neutral and conducting polymers and nanostructures as chemical sensor interfaces; microanalytical systems for organic analytes in air and biological media; polymer characterization and testing in sensor systems and as permeation barriers; exposure assessment strategies; and analytical chemical methods and instrumentation. PANEL ON FUNCTIONAL ORGANIC AND HYBRID MATERIALS Frank Karasz (NAE), chair (see committee biographical sketch). Lisa Klein is a professor in the Department of Ceramic and Materials Science and Engineering at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Her

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expertise is in ceramics and ceramics processing, particularly sol-gel technology. She has been at Rutgers University since 1977, after completing postdoctoral research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In recent years, she has worked in a visiting professor capacity with Sandia National Laboratories/USA, Laboratoire D’Energetique Electrochimique/ France, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem/Israel. Vincent D. McGinniss is senior vice president, Materials Sciences, at Optimer Photonics, Columbus, Ohio. His expertise covers polymer chemistry, specialty coatings, specialty adhesives, fiber-reinforced composites, photoactive catalyst systems, water-based polymers or emulsions, fluorine chemistry, electrodepositable polymer materials, low-temperature cure reactions for coatings and adhesives, and radiation-curable coatings and technology. He is a leading authority on specialty chemical and polymer systems for a wide range of applications, having devised many novel photoinitiator systems, composite systems, water-based coatings, and specialty coatings for commercial use in the wood, can, and floor covering industries. Gary E. Wnek is professor and chair, Department of Chemical Engineering, and affiliate professor of chemistry and biomedical engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University and adjunct professor of chemistry at Virginia Tech. His research deals with polymers with unusual electrical or optical properties, electric field-modulated phenomena, biosensors and biochips, and artificial axons. He is a member of the Editorial Board for Polymer-Plastics Technology and Engineering and has served on the editorial boards for Chemistry of Materials and Progress in Polymer Science. Luping Yu is a professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Chicago. His expertise is in the rational design, synthesis, and characterization of novel functional and multifunctional polymers and molecules, paying great attention to new polymerization methodologies for the synthesis of these new materials. Typical current projects are the development of polymerization methodologies; design, synthesis, and physical studies of photorefractive polymers; second-order nonlinear optical polymers; conjugated diblock polymers for supramolecular self-assembly of nanostructured materials; architectural controls of polymer microstructures, including synthesis of dendritic polyphenylenevinylenes; metal-containing functional polymers; and supramolecular functional materials.

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PANEL ON BIODERIVED AND BIOINSPIRED MATERIALS Michael Jaffe, chair (see committee biographical sketch). Ilhan Aksay is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Princeton Materials Institute of Princeton University. He provides expertise in bioceramics: His current research is on the utilization of colloidal and biomimetic techniques in ceramic processing. In recent years, his work has mainly focused on the utilization of complex fluids to control the architecture of organic/ceramic nanocomposites. His research has resulted not only in contributions to the literature on the fundamentals of ceramic processing but also in products produced by the industry. Mark Alper is deputy director, Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and adjunct professor, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California at Berkeley. His expertise is in biochemistry and materials science. He has held a number of other research management positions at LBNL, including executive director, Chancellor’s Biotechnology Council; associate division head, Materials Sciences Division; and deputy director, Center for Advanced Materials. Dr. Alper founded the LBNL Biomolecular Materials Program and has been director since its inception. Paul Calvert is a professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona. His recent research has revolved around his area of expertise, biomimetic materials; he is studying methods of forming composites by in situ mineralization to mimic bone and tooth, layerwise freeform fabrication to parallel biological growth, methods for producing implant materials, and inkjet printing as a method for building structures from biological and synthetic polymers. Other research areas of interest include polymer-ceramic composites, conducting polymers, diffusion and permeability in polymers, composite interfaces, polymer crystallization and crystallization kinetics, composite materials for bone prostheses, carbon nanotube composites, and free-formed metal-ceramic multilayers. Mauro Ferrari is a professor of internal medicine, of mechanical engineering, and of materials science; director, Biomedical Engineering Center; and associate director, Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, all at Ohio State University. His expertise is in medicine, biomechanics,

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biotransport phenomena, drug delivery, and biomedical micro/ nanotechnology, and his research interests include biomedical nanotechnology and bioMEMS for drug delivery, cell transplantation, and tissue engineering, with emphasis on oncology, cardiovascular disease and diabetes; biosensors and bioseperation; multiscale discrete/continuum mechanics and biomechanics; mechanics of composite materials and structures; thermoelasticity; homogenization theory; and functionally graded materials. Erik Viirre is an assistant adjunct professor, Division of Otolaryngology, University of California at San Diego School of Medicine, and a consultant to laboratories and industries. His research and clinical interests cover vision, hearing, and the balance-sensing system of the body called the vestibular apparatus. His clinical specialties are diagnosis and treatment of vertigo, motion sickness, and balance problems, as well as tinnitus. His recent research has dealt with the use of virtual reality technology in rehabilitating patients with balance disorders, vision research on an advanced visual display technology called the virtual retinal display, and the development of a virtual clinic where he will see patients in remote locations using telemedicine. He has already demonstrated the diagnosis and treatment of vertigo patients in remote locations.