ATTACHMENT B

Non-native Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay Statement of Task

This study will examine the ecological and socio-economic risks and benefits of open water aquaculture or direct introduction of the non-native oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis, in the Chesapeake Bay. The committee will address how C. ariakensis might affect the ecology of the Bay, including effects on native species, water quality, habitat, and the spread of human and oyster diseases. Possible effects on recovery of the native oyster, Crassostrea virginica, will be considered. The potential range and effects of the introduced oyster will be explored, both within the Bay and in neighboring coastal areas. The study will investigate the adequacy of existing regulatory and institutional frameworks to monitor and oversee these activities.

The committee will assess whether the breadth and quality of existing research, on oysters and on other introduced species, is sufficient to support risk assessments of three management options: 1) no use of non-native oysters, 2) open water aquaculture of triploid oysters, and 3) introduction of reproductive diploid oysters. Where current knowledge is inadequate, the committee will recommend additional research priorities.

Study Sponsors

The study is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, Virginia Sea Grant, Maryland Sea Grant, Connecticut Sea Grant, and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

Acknowledgments

This letter report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s (NRC) Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their participation in the review of this report:

Daniel S. Simberloff, University of Tennesee, Knoxville

Preston Pate, North Carolina Division of Fisheries, Morehead City

Chris Langdon, Oregon State University, Corvallis

James T. Carlton, Williams College, Mystic Seaport, Mystic, Connecticut



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ATTACHMENT B Non-native Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay Statement of Task This study will examine the ecological and socio-economic risks and benefits of open water aquaculture or direct introduction of the non-native oyster, Crassostrea ariakensis, in the Chesapeake Bay. The committee will address how C. ariakensis might affect the ecology of the Bay, including effects on native species, water quality, habitat, and the spread of human and oyster diseases. Possible effects on recovery of the native oyster, Crassostrea virginica, will be considered. The potential range and effects of the introduced oyster will be explored, both within the Bay and in neighboring coastal areas. The study will investigate the adequacy of existing regulatory and institutional frameworks to monitor and oversee these activities. The committee will assess whether the breadth and quality of existing research, on oysters and on other introduced species, is sufficient to support risk assessments of three management options: 1) no use of non-native oysters, 2) open water aquaculture of triploid oysters, and 3) introduction of reproductive diploid oysters. Where current knowledge is inadequate, the committee will recommend additional research priorities. Study Sponsors The study is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Maryland Department of Natural Resources, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, Virginia Sea Grant, Maryland Sea Grant, Connecticut Sea Grant, and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. Acknowledgments This letter report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s (NRC) Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their participation in the review of this report: Daniel S. Simberloff, University of Tennesee, Knoxville Preston Pate, North Carolina Division of Fisheries, Morehead City Chris Langdon, Oregon State University, Corvallis James T. Carlton, Williams College, Mystic Seaport, Mystic, Connecticut

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Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this letter report was overseen by John E. Dowling, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Appointed by the NRC, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.