Appendixes



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Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Appendixes

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Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering This page in the original is blank.

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Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering A Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members Ronald Breslow (Co-Chair) is University Professor of Chemistry, Columbia University, and a founder of a new pharmaceutical company. He received his B.A. (1952), M.A. (1954), and Ph.D. (1955) from Harvard University. His research area is organic chemistry with specialization in biochemical model systems, biomimetic synthetic methods, reaction mechanisms, and aromaticity and antiaromaticity. He served as president of the American Chemical Society in 1996 and has authored a book for the general public, Chemistry Today and Tomorrow: The Central, Useful, and Creative Science. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He received the U.S. National Medal of Science in 1991. Matthew V. Tirrell (Co-Chair) is Dean of the College of Engineering at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He was previously Professor and Head of the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota, where he served as Director of its Biomedical Engineering Institute. He received a B.S. from Northwestern University and a Ph.D. from University of Massachusetts. His interests are in transport and interfacial properties of polymers, with particular emphasis on molecular-scale mechanical measurements, bioadhesion, and new materials development. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Jacqueline K. Barton is Arthur and Marian Hanisch Memorial Professor of Chemistry at the California Institute of Technology. She received her A.B. from Barnard College in 1974 and her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1979. She did subsequent postdoctoral work at both AT&T Bell Laboratories and Yale Uni-

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Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering versity. Her research areas are biophysical chemistry and inorganic chemistry. She has focused on studies of recognition and reaction of nucleic acids by transition metal complexes, and particularly DNA-mediated charge transport chemistry. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Dow Chemical Company and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Mark A. Barteau is Robert L. Pigford Professor and Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware. He received his B.S. degree from Washington University in 1976 and his M.S. (1977) and Ph.D. (1981) from Stanford University. His research area is chemical engineering with specialized interests in application of surface techniques to reactions on nonmetals, hydrocarbon and oxygenate chemistry on metals and metal oxides, scanning probe microscopies, and catalysis by metal oxides. Carolyn R. Bertozzi is Professor of Chemistry and Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, a Junior Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and Faculty Associate of the Materials Sciences and Physical Biosciences divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She received her A.B. from Harvard University in 1988 and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1993. Her research focuses on organic chemistry and the combination of molecular and cell biology to investigate the biological functions of glycoconjugates and to develop new therapeutic strategies. Robert A. Brown is Warren K. Lewis Professor of Chemical Engineering and Provost at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his B.S. (1973) and M.S. (1975) from the University of Texas, Austin, and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1979. His research area is chemical engineering with specialization in fluid mechanics and transport phenomena, crystal growth from the melt, microdefect formation in semiconductors and viscoelastic fluids, bifurcation theory applied to transitions in flow problems, and finite element methods for nonlinear transport problems. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Alice P. Gast (BCST liaison) is Vice President for Research and Associate Provost at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she coordinates policy regarding research and graduate education and oversees the Institute’s large interschool laboratories. In addition to her administrative positions, she is the Robert T. Haslam Professor of Chemical Engineering. Prior to her appointment at MIT, Dr. Gast was Associate Chair and Professor of the Department of Chemical Engineering at Stanford University, having joined the Stanford faculty in 1985. She received her B.Sc. in chemical engineering (1980) from the Univer-

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Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering sity of Southern California and her M.A. (1981) and Ph.D. (1984) from Princeton. Her research expertise is in the area of complex fluids and colloids, with a focus on frontiers of the chemical physics of colloidal and polymer solutions, polymer adsorption, and, most recently, proteins, using experimental scattering methods and statistical mechanics. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Ignacio E. Grossmann is Rudolph H. and Florence Dean Professor and head of the chemical engineering department at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his B.Sc. (1974) from Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico, and his M.Sc. (1975) and Ph.D. (1977) degrees from Imperial College, London. He joined Carnegie Mellon in 1979 and has focused his research on the synthesis of integrated flow sheets, batch processes, and mixed-integer optimization. The goals of his work are to develop novel mathematical programming models and techniques in process systems engineering. He was elected to the Mexican Academy of Engineering in 1999, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. James M. Meyer retired in 2001 as Vice President of DuPont Central Research and Development. He joined DuPont in 1969 and held a variety of research and management positions related to elastomers and polymers. He moved to Central Research and Development in 1992 as director of materials science and engineering, and he assumed his current position in 1996. Dr. Meyer received his B.S. degree in chemistry from Indiana University and his Ph.D. degree in inorganic chemistry from Northwestern University. Royce W. Murray is Kenan Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his B.S. from Birmingham Southern College in 1957 and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1960. His research areas are analytical chemistry and materials science with specialized interests in electrochemical techniques and reactions, chemically derivatized surfaces in electrochemistry and analytical chemistry, electrocatalysis, polymer films and membranes, solid state electrochemistry and transport phenomena, and molecular electronics. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Paul J. Reider is Vice President of Chemistry Research at Amgen, Inc. Before moving to Amgen in 2002, he was Vice President of Process Research at Merck Research Laboratories. His research has focused on synthetic organic and natural product chemistry for the development of pharmaceuticals, and he has worked extensively on drugs for AIDS, asthma, arthritis, and bacterial infections. He received his A.B. from Washington Square College in 1972 and his Ph.D. from the University of Vermont in organic chemistry in 1978. As a National Research Awardee (NIH) he did his postdoctoral work at Colorado State University.

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Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering William R. Roush is Warner Lambert/Parke Davis Professor of Chemistry at the University of Michigan. He received his B.S. from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1974 and his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1977. His research area is organic chemistry, with specialized interests in organic synthesis and natural products chemistry, stereochemistry of organic reactions, development of new methods and regents, asymmetric synthesis, and oligosaccharide synthesis. Michael L. Shuler is Director and Professor of the School of Chemical Engineering and Director of Bioengineering at Cornell University. He received his B.S. from the University of Notre Dame in 1969 and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1973. His research area is chemical engineering with specialized interests in mathematical models of cellular growth, plant cell suspension cultures, utilization of genetically modified cells, insect cell cultures, novel bioreactors, environmental biotechnology, and pharmacokinetic models and cell culture analog systems. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Jeffrey J. Siirola is a Research Fellow in the Chemical Process Research Laboratory at Eastman Chemical Company in Kingsport, TN. He received his B.S. degree in chemical engineering from the University of Utah in 1967 and his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1970. His research centers on chemical processing, including chemical process synthesis, computer-aided conceptual process engineering, engineering design theory and methodology, chemical technology, assessment, resource conservation and recovery, artificial intelligence, nonnumeric (symbolic) computer programming, and chemical engineering education. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. George M. Whitesides is Mallinckrodt Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University. He received his A.B. from Harvard College in 1960 and his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology in 1964. His research areas are Materials Science and Organic Chemistry, with specific focus in surface chemistry, materials science, self-assembly, capillary electrophoresis, organic solid state, molecular virology, directed ligand discovery, and protein chemistry. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and he received the U.S. National Medal of Science in 1998. Peter G. Wolynes is Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego. He was previously Professor of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his A.B. from Indiana University in 1971 and his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1976. His research area is physical chemistry with specialized interests in chemical physics of condensed matter, quantum dynamics and reaction kinetics in liquids, dynamics of complex

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Beyond the Molecular Frontier: Challenges for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering fluids, phase transitions and the glassy state, and biophysical applications of statistical mechanics, especially protein folding. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Richard N. Zare is Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science in the Department of Chemistry at Stanford University. He received his B.A. in 1961 and his Ph.D. in 1964 from Harvard University. His research areas are physical and analytical chemistry with specialized interests in application of lasers to chemical problems, molecular structure, molecular reaction dynamics, and chemical analysis. Zare has been a member of various NRC committees and served as co-chair of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and chair of the National Science Board. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and he received the U.S. National Medal of Science in 1983.