TABLE 3-1 World Megacities, 1975, 2000, and (Projected) 2015: Population in Millions

1975

2000

2015

Tokyo (19.8)

New York (15.9)

Shanghai (11.4)

Mexico City (11.2)

Sao Paolo (10)

Tokyo (26.4)

Mexico City (18.1)

Mumbai (18.1)

Sao Paolo (17.8)

Shanghai (17)

New York (16.6)

Lagos (13.4)

Los Angeles (13.1)

Kolkata (12.9)

Buenos Aires (12.6)

Dhaka (12.3)

Karachi (11.8)

Delhi (11.7)

Jakarta (11)

Osaka (11)

Metro Manila (10.9)

Beijing (10.8)

Rio de Janeiro (10.6)

Cairo (10.6)

Tokyo (26.4)

Mumbai (26.1)

Lagos (23.2)

Dhaka (21.1)

Sao Paolo (20.4)

Karachi (19.2)

Mexico City (19.2)

New York (17.4)

Jakarta (17.3)

Kolkata (17.3)

Delhi (16.8)

Metro Manila (14.8)

Shanghai (14.6)

Los Angeles (14.1)

Buenos Aires (14.1)

Cairo (13.8)

Istanbul (12.5)

Beijing (12.3)

Rio de Janeiro (11.9)

Osaka (11.0)

Tianjin (10.7)

Hyderabad (10.5)

Bangkok (10.1)

 

SOURCE: United Nations Population Fund, 2001.

areas in South America (Jeronimo et al., 1994). Ease of transport also allows pathogens and microbial genetic material to travel between regions or continents within human hosts, vectors, animals, sources of food (plants), or cargo (Wilson, 1995).

Immunocompromised Populations

Advances in medicine, science, and technology have led to an increase in the number of people who are immunocompromised. The number of cancer patients has grown steadily during the past two decades, and cancer patients are surviving longer than ever before. The highly infectious disease-susceptible population of transplant patients has also been increasing. Likewise, the widespread use of potent antiretroviral combination therapy has led to a growing population of people living with HIV, who retain a potentially lifelong risk of spreading this infection to others.



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