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Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Cora B. Marrett, Chair, joined the University of Wisconsin system as Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs in 2001, following 4 years as Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. She has held faculty appointments at the Uni- versity of Wisconsin-Madison, Western Michigan University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Previously, she served as the first Assistant Director for the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences at the National Science Foundation and as the director of two programs for the United Negro College Fund under a grant from the Andrew Mellon Foundation. She holds a B.A. degree from Virginia Union University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, all in sociology. She served as a member of the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences and Education at the Na- tional Academies and is currently on the boards for the Argonne Na- tional Laboratory, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Social Science Research Council. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Sigma Xi, the Science Research Society. Daniel R. Ilgen, Vice Chair, is the John A. Hannah professor of psy- chology and management at Michigan State University and has served on the university's institutional review board. Previously, he was a member of the Industrial and Organizational Psychology Department faculty at Purdue University. He is editor of Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. His areas of specialization are in work motivation and small group/team behavior, particularly team decision making, and he is currently a member of the National Research Coun- cil's Committee on Human Factors. He received a Ph.D. degree in psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Tora Kay Bikson is a senior scientist in the Behavioral Sciences Depart- ment of RAND, and she chairs RAND's institutional review board. EIer research has investigated properties of advancing information tech- 253

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254 PROTECTING PARTICIPANTS AND FACILITATING SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES RESEARCH nologies in varied user contexts, addressing such issues as what fac- tors affect the successful incorporation of innovative tools in ongoing activities and how new work media influence group structures and in- teraction processes. Previously, she has taught courses on ethical is- sues in human subjects research in the RAND Graduate School and in the Honors College at the University of California at Los Angeles. She has also served on committees concerned with information technology and with data privacy at the National Academies. She received a Ph.D. degree in philosophy from the University of Missouri. Jamie L. Casey is a research assistant for the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT). She has worked on CNSTAT projects studying the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) eligibility, the State Children's Health Insurance Pro- gram, and the 2000 Census. Previously, she worked for the National Center for Health Statistics. She received a B.A. degree in psychology from Coucher College. Constance F. Citro, Study Director, is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical AssociationlNational Science Foundation research fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau. For the committee, she has served as study director for numerous projects, including the Panel to Eval- uate the 2000 Census, the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participa- tion, and the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Wel- fare Programs. Her research focuses on the quality and accessibility of large, complex microdata files and analysis related to income and poverty measurement. She is a fellow of the American Statistical As- sociation. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. Robert M. Groves is director of the Survey Research Center, a pro- fessor of sociology, and senior research scientist at the Institute for Social Research, all at the University of Michigan. Previously he was the associate director and then director of the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, based at the University of Maryland, a consortium of the University of Maryland, the University of Michigan, and Westat, Inc., sponsored by the federal statistical system. He also served as associate director of the U.S. Census Bureau in 1990-1992. EIe has investigated

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 255 the effects of alternative telephone sample designs on precision, the effect of data collection mode on the quality of survey reports, causes and remedies for nonresponse errors in surveys, estimation and expla- nation of interviewer variance in survey responses, and other topics in survey methods. His current research interests focus on theory- building in survey participation and models of nonresponse reduction and adjustment. He is a member of the Committee on National Statis- tics and a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has an A.B. degree from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. degree from the Uni- versity of Michigan. Robert M. Hauser is Vilas research professor of sociology at the Uni- versity of Wisconsin-Madison, where he directs the Center for Demog- raphy of Health and Aging and the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study. Dur- ing 2001-2002 he was a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and is a fellow of the National Academy of Education, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and the Amer- ican Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served on the National Research Council's Committee on National Statistics, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, and Board on Test- ing and Assessment, and he chaired the National Research Council's Committee on the Appropriate Use of High Stakes Tests. His current research interests include trends in educational progression and social mobility in the United States among racial and ethnic groups, the uses of educational assessment as a policy tool, the effects of families on so- cial and economic inequality, and changes in socioeconomic standing, health, and well-being across the life course. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan. V. Joseph Hotz is a professor and chair of the Department of Eco- nomics at the University of California at Los Angeles. He was a na- tional research associate of the Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research and chaired the center's Ad- visory Panel for Research Uses of Administrative Data. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a member of the board of overseers of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, and chair of the oversight board of the California Census Research Data Center. His research focuses on the economics of the family, applied

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256 PROTECTING PARTICIPANTS AND FACILITATING SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES RESEARCH econometrics, and the evaluation of social programs. He received his Ph.D. degree in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Tanya M. Lee is a project assistant for the Committee on National Statistics. Before joining CNSTAT, she worked at the National Aca- demies' Institute of Medicine for the Committee on Strategies for Small Number Participants Clinical Research Trials and the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine during Travel Beyond Earth Or- bit. She is pursuing a degree in the field of psychology. Patricia Marshall is associate professor of bioethics in the Center for Biomedical Ethics at Case Western Reserve University. Previously, she was an associate professor in the Department of Medicine and the Neiswanger Institute of Biomedical Ethics and Health Policy at Loy- ola University of Chicago. She has served as a consultant to the Pres- ident's National Bioethics Advisor Commission on a project exam- ining ethical issues in international health research and as a consul- tant to the World Health Organization's Council for International Or- ganization of Medical Societies on their revision of ethical guidelines for international research. Her research interests and publications fo- cus on multiculturalism and the application of bioethics practices, re- search ethics and informed consent, and HIV prevention among injec- tion drug users. She has a B.A. degree in behavioral science and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology from the University of Kentucky. Anna C. Mastroianni is assistant professor at the School of Law and the Institute for Public Health Genetics at the University of Washing- ton. She also holds appointments in the Department of Health Services in the university's School of Public Health and Community Medicine and in the Department of Medical History and Ethics in the School of Medicine. She is a Greenwall Foundation faculty scholar in bioethics and a center associate at the University of Minnesota's Center for Bio- ethics. Her research and teaching is in the area of health law and bioethics, with specific interests in legal, ethical, and policy issues related to human subjects research, the use of genetic technologies, women's health, reproductive rights, the use of assisted reproductive technologies, and the responsible conduct of research. She has held a number of legal and federal policy positions, including associate di- rector of the White House Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Ad- vancement of Science. She holds a J.D. degree from the University of

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 257 Pennsylvania School of Law, a B.S. degree in economics from the uni- versity's Wharton School, and a B.A. degree in Spanish and Portuguese from the university's College of Arts and Sciences, as well as an M.P.H. degree from the University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine. John J. (Jack) McArdle is professor of psychology at the University of Virginia. He is also director of the Jefferson Psychometric Laboratory, a visiting fellow at the Institute of Human Development at University of California at Berkeley, an adjunct faculty member at the Depart- ment of Psychiatry at the University of Hawaii, and the lead data an- alyst for research studies on college student-athletes at the National Collegiate Athletic Association. He received a B.A. degree in psychol- ogy and mathematics at Franklin and Marshall College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology and computer sciences at Hofstra Univer- sity. His research focuses on age-sensitive methods for psychological and educational measurement and longitudinal data analysis. He has published work in factor analysis, growth curve analysis, and dynamic modeling of adult cognitive abilities. Eleanor Singer is associate director and senior research scientist at the Survey Research Center of the Institute for Social Research and an ad- junct professor of sociology at the University of Michigan. Previously, she was a senior research scholar at the Center for Social Sciences at Columbia University. She has served as president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and as chair of its ethics com- mittee, as well as editor of Public Opinion Quarterly. Her research has largely focused on methodological issues in surveys, among them the effect of confidentiality concerns on survey participation. She received a B.A. degree from Queens College and a Ph.D. degree from Columbia University. William A. Yost, Liaison, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Social Sciences, is associate vice president for research and dean of the grad- uate schools and professor of hearing sciences at Loyola University of Chicago. He was previously the director of the Parmly Hearing In- stitute and director of the interdisciplinary neuroscience minor pro- gram at Loyola. He also is an adjunct professor of psychology, adjunct professor of otolaryngology, and a member of the Parmly Hearing In- stitute. He received a B.S. degree in psychology from the Colorado College and a Ph.D. degree in Experimental Psychology from Indiana

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258 PROTECTING PARTICIPANTS AND FACILITATING SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES RESEARCH University, and he received an honorary degree of doctor of science from the Colorado College. He has served on the faculty at the Univer- sity of Florida and held visiting appointments at Northwestern Univer- sity and the Colorado College. His specialty within the area of hearing sciences is auditory perception and psychoacoustics. He is a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, the American Speech, Hearing, and Language Association, the American Psychological Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.