Appendix
Biographies of Committee and Staff Members

COMMITTEE ON THE ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN RESPONDING TO TERRORISM

John L. Hennessy, Chair, is president of Stanford University, where he joined the faculty in 1977, was the chair of the Department of Computer Science in 1994, and became dean of the School of Engineering in 1996. He is an expert in computer architecture and is recognized for innovation in software techniques as the codeveloper of reduced instruction set computing (RISC). In 2001 Dr. Hennessy received the Eckert-Mauchly Award from the Association for Computing Machinery and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and honorary doctoral degrees from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Villanova University, his two alma maters. He is currently chairman of the board at Atheros, and was a board member at Alentec Corporation and an advisory board member at Microsoft Corporation and Tensilica. Over the past decade, he has served on numerous committees at the National Academies, most recently as the chair of the Computer Science and Engineering Committee and the Committee on Membership during 1999-2000. He has served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board committees that produced Global Trends in Computer Technology and Their Impact on Export Control, Academic Careers for Experimental Computer Scientists and Engineers, and Evolving the High Performance Computing and Communications Initiative to Support the Nation’s Information Infrastructure. He has also provided his computer expertise and leadership skills on committees and commissions of the National



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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities Appendix Biographies of Committee and Staff Members COMMITTEE ON THE ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN RESPONDING TO TERRORISM John L. Hennessy, Chair, is president of Stanford University, where he joined the faculty in 1977, was the chair of the Department of Computer Science in 1994, and became dean of the School of Engineering in 1996. He is an expert in computer architecture and is recognized for innovation in software techniques as the codeveloper of reduced instruction set computing (RISC). In 2001 Dr. Hennessy received the Eckert-Mauchly Award from the Association for Computing Machinery and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Computer Society and honorary doctoral degrees from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Villanova University, his two alma maters. He is currently chairman of the board at Atheros, and was a board member at Alentec Corporation and an advisory board member at Microsoft Corporation and Tensilica. Over the past decade, he has served on numerous committees at the National Academies, most recently as the chair of the Computer Science and Engineering Committee and the Committee on Membership during 1999-2000. He has served on the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board committees that produced Global Trends in Computer Technology and Their Impact on Export Control, Academic Careers for Experimental Computer Scientists and Engineers, and Evolving the High Performance Computing and Communications Initiative to Support the Nation’s Information Infrastructure. He has also provided his computer expertise and leadership skills on committees and commissions of the National

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities Science Foundation and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). He is an alumnus of CSTB and a member of Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, Pi Mu Epsilon, and the National Academy of Engineering. David A. Patterson, Vice Chair, is the E.H. and M.E. Pardee Chair of Computer Science at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught computer architecture since joining the faculty in 1977 and has been chair of the Computer Science Division of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at Berkeley. He is well known for leading the design and implementation of RISC I, the first Very Large-Scale Integration (VLSI) Reduced Instruction Set Computer, which became the foundation for the architecture currently used by Fujitsu, Sun Microsystems, and Xerox. He was also a leader of the Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID) project, which led to high-performance storage systems from many companies, and the Network of Workstation (NOW) project, which led to cluster technology used by Internet companies such as Inktomi. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Association for Computing Machinery. He served as chair of the Computing Research Association. His current research interests are in building novel microprocessors using Intelligent Dynamic Random Access Memory (IRAM) for use in portable multimedia devices and using Recovery Oriented Computing to design available, maintainable, and evolvable servers for Internet services. He has consulted for many companies, including Digital Equipment Corporation, Hewlett Packard, Intel, and Sun Microsystems, and he is the coauthor of five books. Dr. Patterson served on the CSTB committees that produced Computing the Future: A Broader Agenda for Computer Science and Engineering and Making IT Better: Expanding Information Technology Research to Meet Society’s Needs. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a current member of CSTB. Steven M. Bellovin, fellow at AT&T Research, is a renowned authority on security—in particular, Internet security. Dr. Bellovin received a B.A. degree from Columbia University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. While a graduate student, he helped create Netnews; for this, he and the other collaborators were awarded the 1995 USENIX Lifetime Achievement Award. At AT&T Laboratories, Dr. Bellovin does research in networks and security, and why the two do not get along. He has embraced a number of public interest causes and weighed in (e.g., through his writings) on initiatives (e.g., in the areas of cryptography and law enforcement) that appear to compromise privacy. He is currently focusing on cryptographic protocols and network management. Dr. Bellovin is the coauthor of the recent book Firewalls and Internet Security: Repelling the Wily Hacker, and he is a member of the Internet Architecture Board. He

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities has recently been elected to the National Academy of Engineering. He served on the CSTB committee that produced Trust in Cyberspace and is a member of the committee to study authentication technologies and their implications for privacy. That committee is addressing a range of security (and privacy) issues, including those relating to data collection (e.g., biometrics) and analysis (e.g., tracking systems), as well as a range of systems issues. W. Earl Boebert is an expert on information security, with experience in national security and intelligence as well as commercial applications and needs. He is a senior scientist at Sandia National Laboratories. He has 30 years experience in communications and computer security, is the holder or co-holder of 13 patents, and has participated in National Research Council studies on security matters. Prior to joining Sandia, he was the technical founder and chief scientist of Secure Computing Corporation, where he developed the Sidewinder security server, a system that currently protects several thousand sites. Before that he worked 22 years at Honeywell, rising to the position of senior research fellow. At Honeywell he worked on secure systems, cryptographic devices, flight software, and a variety of real-time simulation and control systems, and won Honeywell’s highest award for technical achievement for his part in developing a very large scale radar landmass simulator. He also developed and presented a course on systems engineering and project management that was eventually given to more than 3,000 students in 13 countries. He served on the CSTB committees that produced Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age and Trust in Cyberspace, and participated in Project Initiation Fund workshops on “Cyber-Attack” and “Insider Threat.” David Borth is an expert on wireless communications, with insight into national security as well as commercial needs. He is corporate vice president and director of the Communication Systems and Technologies Laboratory of Motorola Incorporated, a part of the company’s research arm, Motorola Laboratory. Dr. Borth joined Motorola in 1980 as a member of the Systems Research Laboratory in corporate research and development in Schaumburg, Illinois. As a member of that organization, he has conducted research on digital modulation techniques, adaptive digital signal processing methods applied to communication systems, and personal communication systems including both cellular and Personal Communications Service systems. He has contributed to Motorola’s implementations of the GSM, TDMA (IS-54/IS-136), and CDMA (IS-95) digital cellular systems. In his current role, he manages a multinational (United States, Australia, France, Japan) organization focusing on all aspects of communication systems, ranging from theoretical systems studies to system and subsystem analysis and implementation to integrated

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities circuit designs. Dr. Borth received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Previously, he was a member of the technical staff of the systems division of Watkins-Johnson Company and an assistant professor in the School of Electrical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Borth is a member of Motorola’s Science Advisory Board Associates and has been elected a Dan Noble Fellow, Motorola’s highest honorary technical award. He has been issued 31 patents and has authored or coauthored chapters of 5 books in addition to 25 publications. He received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the University of Illinois Electrical and Computer Engineering Alumni Association and was elected a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers for his contributions to the design and development of wireless telecommunication systems. He is a registered professional engineer in the State of Illinois and a current member of CSTB. William J. Brinkman has been vice president of Physical Sciences Research at Bell Labs of Lucent Technologies since 1993. He is an expert in the area of condensed matter physics as it pertains to telecommunications and information-processing technologies. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Missouri in 1965. Dr. Brinkman joined Bell Laboratories in 1966 after spending one year as a National Science Foundation postdoctoral fellow at Oxford University. He moved to Sandia National Laboratories in 1984, but returned to Bell Laboratories in 1987 to become executive director of the Physics Research Division. His responsibilities include the direction of research in physical sciences, optoelectronic and electronic devices, fiber optics, and related areas. He has worked on theories of condensed matter, and his early work also involved the theory of spin fluctuations in metals and other highly correlated Fermi liquids. Subsequent theoretical work on liquid crystals and incommensurate systems are additional important contributions that he has made to the theoretical understanding of condensed matter. As manager of an industrial research organization with a budget of $200 million. Dr. Brinkman is strongly interested in improving technology conversion and improving the connection between research and products. He was the recipient of the 1994 George E. Pake Prize. Over the past 20 years, he has served on numerous committees of the National Academies, currently the National Academy of Sciences 2002 Nominating Committee and most recently the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. John M. Cioffi is an expert on communications technologies, with an emphasis on wireline contexts. He received his BS in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois in 1978 and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University in 1984. He worked for Bell Laborato

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities ries from 1978 to 1984, IBM Research from 1984 to 1986, and has been an electrical engineering professor at Stanford University since 1986. Dr. Cioffi founded Amati Communications Corporation in 1991 (purchased by Texas Instruments in 1997) and was an officer/director from 1991 to 1997. Currently he is on the boards or advisory boards of BigBand Networks, Coppercom, GoDigital, Ikanos, Ionospan, Ishoni, IteX, Marvell, Kestrel, Charter Ventures, and Portview Ventures. Dr. Cioffi’s specific interests are in the area of high-performance digital transmission. He has received various awards: member, National Academy of Engineering (2001), IEEE Kobayashi Medal (2001), IEEE Millennium Medal (2000), IEEE Fellow (1996), IEE JJ Tomson Medal (2000), 1999 University of Illinois Outstanding Alumnus, 1991 IEEE Communications Magazine best paper, 1995 American National Standards Institute T1 Outstanding Achievement Award, National Science Foundation Presidential Investigator (1987-1992). Dr. Cioffi has published more than 200 papers and holds over 40 patents, most of which are widely licensed, including basic patents on DMT, VDSL, and vectored transmission. He served on the CSTB committee that produced Broadband: Bringing Home the Bits and is a current member of CSTB. W. Bruce Croft is chair of the computer science department, as well as distinguished university professor, at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, which he joined in 1979. In 1992, he became the director of the National Science Foundation State/Industry/University Collaborative Research Center for Intelligent Information Retrieval (CIIR), which combines basic research with technology transfer to a variety of government and industry partners. Dr. Croft received his B.Sc. (Honors) degree in 1973 and an M.Sc. in computer science in 1974 from Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. He earned his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Cambridge, England, in 1979. His research interests are in several areas of information retrieval, including retrieval models, Web search engines, cross-lingual retrieval, distributed search, question answering, text summarization, and text data mining. He has published more than 120 articles on these subjects. Dr. Croft has consulted for many companies and government agencies. He co-founded a search engine startup in 1996, and his research is being used in a number of operational systems. He was chair of the ACM Special Interest Group on Information Retrieval from 1987 to 1991. He is currently editor-in-chief of the ACM’s Transactions on Information Systems and an associate editor for Information Processing and Management. He has served on numerous program committees and has been involved in the organization of many workshops and conferences. He was elected a fellow of ACM in 1997 and received the Research Award from the American Society for Information Science and Technology in 2000. He is a member of CSTB’s Digital Government

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities committee, which has provided insight into government application contexts. He has a history of research interactions with the intelligence community, and his emphases relate to data collection and analysis. He is a current member of CSTB. William P. Crowell is a former deputy director and chief operating officer of the National Security Agency. Prior to the NSA, he was vice president of Atlantic Aerospace Electronics Corporation. In 1998 he joined Cylink and is currently president and CEO. The company helped pioneer the use of computer security systems within major financial and government institutions. He holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from Louisiana State University. Jeffrey M. Jaffe has broad knowledge of systems, with emphases on networked/distributed systems and the associated security challenges. He is vice president of research and advanced technologies for Lucent Technologies Bell Laboratories. The Advanced Technologies Group works with Lucent’s business units in the commercial development and deployment of new technologies, with an emphasis in networks planning, software and systems engineering. Prior to joining Lucent, Dr. Jaffe held a variety of research and management positions with International Business Machines (IBM). He joined IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 1979, conducting research on networking protocols. He led research teams in developing networking and security software and user interfaces. He was later promoted to a number of executive positions, including vice president of systems and software. In this role, he coordinated the efforts of global research teams in supporting IBM’s current product lines and developing new software and hardware systems. Dr. Jaffe next served as corporate vice president of technology and helped to convert research into commercial products. He played key roles in assessing new technologies and policy enactment. In his most recent position with IBM, Dr. Jaffe managed all facets of IBM’s network software and security product business. Dr. Jaffe is a fellow of the IEEE and the ACM. The U.S. government has consulted with him on numerous policy initiatives with a focus on the Internet. In 1997, President Clinton appointed Dr. Jaffe to the advisory committee for the President’s Commission for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Dr. Jaffe has chaired the Chief Technology Officer Group of the Computer Systems Policy Project (CSPP), which consists of a dozen of the top computer and telecommunications companies. Dr. Jaffe earned a B.S. degree in mathematics, as well as M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a current member of CSTB. Butler W. Lampson is known for his expertise in systems and systems architecture. At present, he is a distinguished engineer at Microsoft Corporation, where he works on problems of broad concern, such as

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities security and information management. Before joining Microsoft, Dr. Lampson was a senior corporate consulting engineer at Digital Equipment Corporation and a senior research fellow at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. He has worked on computer architecture, local area networks, raster printers, page description languages, operating systems, remote procedure call, programming languages and their semantics, programming in the large, fault-tolerant computing, computer security, and WYSIWYG editors. He was one of the designers of the SDS 940 time-sharing system, the Alto personal distributed computing system, the Xerox 9700 laser printer, two-phase commit protocols, the Autonet LAN, and several programming languages. He received a Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California at Berkeley and honorary Sc.D. degrees from the Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich, and the University of Bologna. He holds a number of patents on networks, security, raster printing, and transaction processing. Dr. Lampson is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received the Association for Computing Machinery’s Software Systems Award in 1984 for his work on the Alto, and the Turing Award in 1992. He served on the CSTB committees that produced Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age, Evolving the High Performance Computing and Communications Initiative to Support the Nation’s Information Infrastructure, and Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges. He is a current member of CSTB. Edward D. Lazowska has broad knowledge of software and distributed and high-performance systems. He holds the Bill and Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. Dr. Lazowska received his A.B. from Brown University in 1972 and his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1977. He has been at the University of Washington since that time. His research concerns the design and analysis of distributed and parallel computer systems. Dr. Lazowska is a member of the DARPA Information Science and Technology Group, past chair of the Computing Research Association, past chair of the National Science Foundation Computer and Information Science and Engineering advisory committee, and a member of the Technical Advisory Board for Microsoft Research. He served on the CSTB committees that produced Evolving the High Performance Computing and Communications Initiative to Support the Nation’s Information Infrastructure and Looking Over the Fence at Networks: A Neighbor’s View of Networking Research. Currently, he serves on the National Research Council committee Improving Learning with Information Technology. He is a fellow of the ACM and of the IEEE and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a current member of CSTB.

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities David E. Liddle has a history of conducting and managing computer systems innovation, with an emphasis on interactive systems. At present, after leaving a series of research-management positions, he is a general partner in the firm U.S. Venture Partners (USVP), a leading Silicon Valley venture capital firm that specializes in building companies from an early stage in digital communications/networking, e-commerce, semiconductors, technical software, and e-health. He retired in December 1999 after 8 years as CEO of Interval Research Corporation. During and after his education (he received B.S. and E.E. degrees from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Toledo, Ohio), Dr. Liddle has spent his professional career developing technologies for interaction and communication between people and computers in activities spanning research, development, management, and entrepreneurship. He spent 10 years at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center and the Xerox Information Products Group, where he was responsible for the first commercial implementation of the graphical user interface and local area networking. He then founded Metaphor Computer Systems, whose technology was adopted by IBM and the company ultimately acquired by IBM in 1991. In 1992, Dr. Liddle cofounded Interval Research Corporation with Paul Allen. Since 1996, the company formed six new companies and several joint ventures based on the research conducted at Interval. Dr. Liddle is a consulting professor of computer science at Stanford University. He has served as a director at Sybase, Broderbund Software, Metricom, Starwave, and Ticketmaster; he is currently a director with The New York Times. He was honored as a distinguished alumnus from the University of Michigan and is a member of the national advisory committee at the College of Engineering of that university. He is also a member of the advisory committee of the school of engineering at Stanford University. He has been elected a senior fellow of the Royal College of Art for his contributions to human-computer interaction. Dr. Liddle has had a number of interactions with national security entities on an advisory basis, providing insights into military mind sets and needs. He is a current member of CSTB. Tom M. Mitchell has just returned to Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) after a 2-year leave of absence as vice president and chief scientist for WhizBang! Labs. At CMU, he is the Fredkin Professor of Learning and Artificial Intelligence in the School of Computer Science and founding director of CMU’s Center for Automated Learning and Discovery. Dr. Mitchell is known for his work in machine learning, data mining, and artificial intelligence. His research ranges from developing software agents that learn to customize to their users, to Web crawlers that learn to extract factual information from Web sites, to computers that mine medical records to learn which future patients are at high mortality risk. He is

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities the author of the widely used textbook Machine Learning. Dr. Mitchell is a fellow and president of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence. Prior to joining the faculty of Carnegie Mellon University in 1986, he taught at Rutgers University. He received his B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his M.S.and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University. He has had research funded by the Central Intelligence Agency and has consulted with the agency recently about the application of WhizBang! technology to intelligence needs. He is a current member of CSTB. Donald A. Norman is a user advocate. Business Week calls him a cantankerous visionary—cantankerous in his quest for excellence. Dr. Norman is cofounder of the Nielsen Norman Group, an executive consulting firm that helps companies produce human-centered products and services. In this role, he serves on the advisory boards of numerous companies. Dr. Norman is a professor of computer science at Northwestern University and professor emeritus of cognitive science and psychology at the University of California, San Diego. He is a former vice president of the advanced technology group of Apple Computer and was an executive at Hewlett Packard. Dr. Norman is the author of The Psychology of Everyday Things, Things That Make Us Smart, and, most recently, The Invisible Computer, a book that Business Week has called the bible of post-PC thinking. He is a current member of CSTB. Jeannette M. Wing is a professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. Her current focus is on applying automated reasoning tools to specify and verify autonomous and embedded systems for their fault-tolerant, security, and survivability properties. She is the associate dean for academic affairs for the School of Computer Science and the associate department head for the computer science Ph.D. program. She received her S.B. and S.M. degrees in electrical engineering and computer science in 1979 and her Ph.D. in computer science in 1983, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Wing’s general research interests are in the areas of formal methods, concurrent and distributed systems, and programming languages. She was on the computer science faculty at the University of Southern California (USC) and has worked at Bell Laboratories, USC/Information Sciences Institute, and Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. She has also consulted for Digital Equipment Corporation, the Mellon Institute (Carnegie Mellon Research Institute), System Development Corporation, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. She was on the National Science Foundation Scientific Advisory Board and the Defense Advance Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Information Science and Technology (ISAT) Group. She is or has been on the editorial board of seven journals. She is a member of the ACM (fellow), the IEEE (senior member), Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, and Eta Kappa

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities Nu. Professor Wing was elected an ACM fellow in 1998 and is a current member of CSTB. STAFF Herbert S. Lin is senior scientist and senior staff officer at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies, where he has been the study director of major projects on public policy and information technology. These studies include a 1996 study on national cryptography policy (Cryptography’s Role in Securing the Information Society), a 1991 study on the future of computer science (Computing the Future: A Broader Agenda for Computer Science and Engineering), a 1999 study of Defense Department systems for command, control, communications, computing, and intelligence (Realizing the Potential of C4I: Fundamental Challenges), and a 2000 study on workforce issues in high technology (Building a Workforce for the Information Economy). Prior to his NRC service, he was a professional staff member and staff scientist for the House Armed Services Committee (1986-1990), where his portfolio included defense policy and arms control issues. He also has significant expertise in mathematics and science education. He received his doctorate in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Avocationally, he is a long-time folk and swing dancer and a poor magician. Apart from his CSTB work, a list of publications in cognitive science, science education, biophysics, arms control, and defense policy is available on request. Steven Woo is the dissemination and program officer with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council. In this capacity, he formulates the dissemination and marketing plan for the study projects and workshops of CSTB. This includes distribution of CSTB reports in government, policy, academia, and private sectors; outreach to promote CSTB to current and potential sponsors; and raising awareness of CSTB’s resources and expertise among government and private industry. In addition, he handles the Program Office activities for some of the projects of CSTB. Prior to joining CSTB, Mr. Woo was an Internet and marketing consultant for clients ranging from Fortune 500s to nonprofits. His background includes marketing services for the Los Angeles Dodgers and several years of experience in systems engineering and analysis. Mr. Woo holds a B.S. in engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles and an M.B.A. from Georgetown University. D.C. Drake has been a senior project assistant with CSTB since September 1999. He is currently working on a project on critical information infrastructure protection and the law and also helped with the project that produced The Internet Under Crisis Conditions: Learning from September 11.

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Information Technology for Counterterrorism: Immediate Actions and Future Possibilities He came to Washington in January 1999 after finishing a master’s degree in international politics and communications at the University of Kentucky. He earned a B.A. in international relations and German from Rhodes College in 1996. He has worked for the Hanns-Seidl Foundation in Munich, Germany, and in Washington, D.C., for the National Conference of State Legislatures’ International Programs Office and for the Majority Staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

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