Appendix B Committee Membership

Edwin P. Przybylowicz (NAE), chair, retired in 1991 after more than 35 years with the Eastman Kodak Company as senior vice president and director of research. He became assistant director of Kodak Research Laboratories in 1983 and was named director of research and elected senior vice president of the company in August 1985. He has served as a commissioner of the U.S.–Polish Joint Fund for Cooperation in Science and Engineering, a program that fosters the collaboration of Polish and U.S. scientists, chairing conferences and workshops on technology transfer in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Russia. From 1994 to 1996 he was director of the Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Przybylowicz received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. degree in analytical chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on numerous National Research Council committees. He is currently an elected member of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Bureau and its Executive Committee and past chair of the U.S. National Committee for IUPAC.

Edward V. Browell is head of the Lidar Applications Group in the Atmospheric Sciences Competency at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) in Hampton, Virginia. He is an international authority on laser remote sensing systems and their application to atmospheric science investigations from ground-based, airborne, and space-based platforms. Dr. Browell received his Ph.D. in 1974 from the University of Florida, where he conducted both experimental and theoretical studies on the reflectance of laser beams from clouds and hazes. For the past 28 years, he has been at the NASA LaRC developing and applying lidar systems to a broad range of atmospheric investigations. His activities have primarily been focused on the development and application of airborne differential absorption lidar systems for studies of ozone, water vapor, aerosols, and clouds. He has participated in over 30 major airborne field experiments all over the world to study atmospheric processes in the troposphere and lower stratosphere and is a recognized international leader in this field. In 1991 Dr. Browell received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement for his studies of fundamental atmospheric gas and aerosol processes, and in 1998 he was awarded the NASA Out-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 37
Appendix B Committee Membership Edwin P. Przybylowicz (NAE), chair, retired in 1991 after more than 35 years with the Eastman Kodak Company as senior vice president and director of research. He became assistant director of Kodak Research Laboratories in 1983 and was named director of research and elected senior vice president of the company in August 1985. He has served as a commissioner of the U.S.–Polish Joint Fund for Cooperation in Science and Engineering, a program that fosters the collaboration of Polish and U.S. scientists, chairing conferences and workshops on technology transfer in Poland, the Czech Republic, and Russia. From 1994 to 1996 he was director of the Center for Imaging Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Przybylowicz received a B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. degree in analytical chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on numerous National Research Council committees. He is currently an elected member of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Bureau and its Executive Committee and past chair of the U.S. National Committee for IUPAC. Edward V. Browell is head of the Lidar Applications Group in the Atmospheric Sciences Competency at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) in Hampton, Virginia. He is an international authority on laser remote sensing systems and their application to atmospheric science investigations from ground-based, airborne, and space-based platforms. Dr. Browell received his Ph.D. in 1974 from the University of Florida, where he conducted both experimental and theoretical studies on the reflectance of laser beams from clouds and hazes. For the past 28 years, he has been at the NASA LaRC developing and applying lidar systems to a broad range of atmospheric investigations. His activities have primarily been focused on the development and application of airborne differential absorption lidar systems for studies of ozone, water vapor, aerosols, and clouds. He has participated in over 30 major airborne field experiments all over the world to study atmospheric processes in the troposphere and lower stratosphere and is a recognized international leader in this field. In 1991 Dr. Browell received the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement for his studies of fundamental atmospheric gas and aerosol processes, and in 1998 he was awarded the NASA Out-

OCR for page 37
standing Leadership Medal for outstanding leadership in the development and application of laser remote sensing systems in the investigation of global atmospheric processes. Dr. Browell is author or coauthor of over 190 papers published in journals and books, and he is a fellow of the Optical Society of America and a member of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society. Dr. Browell is also the chief editor for atmospheric technology for the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology. D. Bruce Chase is a senior research fellow with E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Company. He received a B.A. in mathematics and chemistry from Williams College in 1970 and a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Princeton University in 1975. His research interests include industrial applications of vibrational spectroscopy, Fourier transform techniques and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, structure/orientation development in fibers, and near-field vibrational spectroscopy. Dr. Chase is a recipient of the Bunsen-Kirkhoff Prize, the Bomem-Michelson Award, the American Chemical Society Analytical Division Award in Spectrochemical Analysis, and the Anachem Award. James A. de Haseth received his Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1977, before spending 18 months as a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Alabama. He joined the faculty of the University of Alabama in 1979. In 1983 he joined the faculty at the University of Georgia, where he is currently a professor of chemistry. Professor de Haseth’s research is directed to the interface between chromatographic systems and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. His research also encompasses the development and use of chemometric methods for data analysis. He has published in a wide variety of areas that pertain to Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Richard C. Flagan is a professor of chemical engineering at the California Institute of Technology, where his research involves investigations of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere and the processing of advanced materials and devices. Dr. Flagan has received numerous awards for his work, including the Marian Smoluchowski Award from GAeF (1990), the David Sinclair Award from the American Association for Aerosol Research (1993), and the Thomas Bacon Award in Fluid-Particle Systems from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (1997). He earned his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1969 and his S.M. and Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971 and 1973, respectively. Peter R. Griffiths is a professor of analytical chemistry and chair of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Idaho. Dr. Griffiths obtained his bachelor’s degree at Oxford University in 1964 and his Ph.D. also at Oxford in 1967. After short stints with two small businesses (Digilab and Sadtler Research), he held a faculty position at Ohio University from 1972 to 1982, before moving to the University of California, Riverside, where he spent seven years, prior to taking up his present position. Professor Griffiths’s research is centered on the application of vibrational spectrometry to the solution of problems of analytical, environmental, and structural chemistry. Professor Griffiths’s group is developing techniques that allow materials in hazardous or toxic waste sites to be identified remotely using optical fibers mounted on a robotic transport. Professor Griffiths has received several awards for his work, including the Fritz Pregl Medal of the Austrian Society for Analytical Chemistry in 1995; he was president of the Society for Applied Spectroscopy in 1994. David W. Layton is division leader of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). During the early part of his 27-year career at LLNL, his

OCR for page 37
research focused on the health and environmental impacts of geothermal energy development in the western United States. Later, he led a major assessment of the information available on conventional ordnance (i.e., explosives and propellants) in order to support studies of the impacts of weapons demilitarization. He was also one of the lead investigators of a DoD-funded project to revise the field water quality standards used by the U.S. military. After these projects, his research emphasis gradually shifted to the development of quantitative risk assessments of environmental contaminants. He has prepared risk assessments of hazardous gas releases, residual groundwater contamination at a Superfund site, plutonium-contaminated soils, heterocyclic amines in cooked foods, and nuclear wastes dumped in the Arctic Ocean. In addition, he has worked to improve exposure parameters for use in risk assessments. For example, he developed an innovative, metabolically based method for determining breathing rates and conducted research on the resuspension of particles indoors. More recently, he has initiated projects dealing with environmental assessments of transportation fuels and associated additives such as ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether. Thomas A. Reichardt is a senior member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. He received his B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in 1992 and 1994, respectively. He was awarded a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1999. During the following year he was a postdoctoral appointee in the Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department at Sandia National Laboratories. In 2000 he began work at his current position. He has conducted research on several laser-based measurement techniques for combustion diagnostics and environmental sensing, including laser-induced fluorescence, degenerate four-wave mixing, polarization spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, and backscatter absorption gas imaging. His current research interests include active and passive optical techniques for chemical species detection, tunable infrared laser sources, and development of a handheld device for detection of gas leaks. Lorenz R. Rhomberg is an expert at Gradient Corporation in quantitative risk assessment, including pharmacokinetic modeling, and probabilistic methods, with special experience in chlorinated solvents and endocrine active agents. He is the author of several books and more than 50 articles on these topics. Before coming to Gradient, he was on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health, where he remains an adjunct professor, and at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dr. Rhomberg is active in professional groups and environmental policy development, focusing on current issues in the interpretation of toxicological data in human health risk assessment through service on panels sponsored by government, industry, and such organizations as the National Academy of Sciences and the International Life Sciences Institute. He is a member of EPA’s Food Quality Protection Act Science Review Board and has participated in several recent Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel meetings concerning cumulative risk. Dr. Rhomberg earned his Ph.D. in population biology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and his B.Sc. in biology from Queen’s University in Ontario.