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Biographical Information for Steering Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Panelists

STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Roberta Balstad Miller, Chair, has worked and published extensively in the areas of science and technology policy and human interactions in global environmental change. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Currently the director of the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University, she was previously a staff associate with the Social Science Research Council (1975-1981), the founding executive director of the Consortium of Social Science Associations (COSSA) (1981-1984), and director of the Division of Social and Economic Science at the National Science Foundation (1984-1993). She received NSF’s Meritorious Service Award in 1993. Dr. Miller has served as chair of a number of scientific advisory groups, including the NATO Advisory Panel on Advanced Science Institutes/ Advanced Research Workshops, the Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Human Dominated Systems Directorate of the U.S. Man in the Biosphere Program, and others. From 1992 to 1994, she served as vice president of the International Social Science Council. Dr. Miller’s NRC service includes former membership on the Climate Research Committee, the Global Change Research Committee, the Committee on the Geographic Foundation for Agenda 21, the Space Studies Board, the Board’s Task Group on Research and Analysis Programs, and the Committee on Buildings and Community Systems Energy Conservation (Phase III).



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B Biographical Information for Steering Committee Members, Workshop Speakers, and Panelists STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS Roberta Balstad Miller, Chair, has worked and published extensively in the areas of science and technology policy and human interactions in global environmental change. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. Currently the director of the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University, she was previously a staff associate with the Social Science Research Council (1975-1981), the founding executive director of the Consortium of Social Science Associations (COSSA) (1981-1984), and director of the Division of Social and Economic Science at the National Science Foundation (1984-1993). She received NSF’s Meritorious Service Award in 1993. Dr. Miller has served as chair of a number of scientific advisory groups, including the NATO Advisory Panel on Advanced Science Institutes/ Advanced Research Workshops, the Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Human Dominated Systems Directorate of the U.S. Man in the Biosphere Program, and others. From 1992 to 1994, she served as vice president of the International Social Science Council. Dr. Miller’s NRC service includes former membership on the Climate Research Committee, the Global Change Research Committee, the Committee on the Geographic Foundation for Agenda 21, the Space Studies Board, the Board’s Task Group on Research and Analysis Programs, and the Committee on Buildings and Community Systems Energy Conservation (Phase III).

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Alexander F.H. Goetz has been a professor of geological sciences and director of the Center for the Study of Earth from Space (part of CIRES) at the University of Colorado, Boulder, since 1985. Dr. Goetz received degrees in physics, geology, and planetary science, all from the California Institute of Technology. Previously he spent 15 years at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, where he started and headed the geologic remote-sensing group and initiated the development of imaging spectrometry, now known as hyperspectral imaging. Prior to JPL he spent 3 years at Bellcomm, a subsidiary of AT&T Bell Labs, working on the Apollo program. Dr. Goetz has been a principal investigator in the Apollo, Skylab, shuttle, and Landsat programs. He was a member of the Landsat 7 science team and plays a similar role in the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite team. Dr. Goetz has received numerous awards, among them the NASA/ Department of the Interior William T. Pecora award. In addition, Dr. Goetz was a founder and the CEO of Analytical Spectral Devices, Inc., in Boulder, for 10 years and is currently its chairman. Lawrence W. Harding, Jr., is a research professor in the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, with appointments at Maryland Sea Grant and the Horn Point Laboratory. His research focuses on the use of aircraft and satellite remote sensing of ocean color to study phytoplankton responses to nutrient enrichment in estuarine and coastal waters. He also directs Sea Grant educational activities in remote sensing in collaboration with NASA scientists. Dr. Harding’s main interests include coordination of a regional, multiplatform remote-sensing program in the Chesapeake Bay region to further the understanding of ecosystem health by applying new technologies to contemporary ecological issues. John R. Jensen’s research focuses on remote sensing of vegetation biophysical resources, especially inland and coastal wetlands; remote sensing of urban, suburban, and land use cover; the development of improved digital image processing classification, change detection, and error evaluation algorithms; and the development of educational materials for remote sensing instruction. Dr. Jensen has conducted contract and grant research for the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site, NASA commercial applications, and NOAA CoastWatch. He is the author of the remote sensing textbooks Introductory Digital Image Processing: A Remote Sensing Perspective and Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective. He is the past president of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) and currently serves on four National Research Council committees associated with remote sensing of the environment. Chris J. Johannsen is director of the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing (LARS) and professor of agronomy at Purdue University. His research interests are in spatial, spectral, and temporal aspects of remote sensing relating

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to geographic information systems (GIS) as applied to precision agriculture, land resource development, and land degradation. He was director of the Environmental Sciences and Engineering Institute (previously the Natural Resources Research Institute) (1988-1995) and director of the Agricultural Data Network (1985-1987) at Purdue University. From 1981 to 1985, Dr. Johannsen was the director of the Geographic Resources Center, Extension Division, at the University of Missouri at Columbia. Dr. Johannsen has been named a fellow of the American Society of Agronomy, the Soil Science Society of America, and the Soil Conservation Society of America and is a member of the International Soil Society, the American Society of Photogrammetry, and Sigma Xi. He has served on the Space Studies Board’s Committee on Earth Studies (1995-1998), the Committee on NASA Information Systems (1986-1987), and the Panel on Earth Resources (1982-1983). Molly Macauley is a senior fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF), where she directs its space economics research program. Her research interests include space economics and policy; recycling and solid waste management; urban transportation policy; and the use of economic incentives in environmental regulation. An economist at RFF since 1983 and a long-time analyst of the commercial use of space technology, Dr. Macauley offered her views to Congress in May 1997 on how government can foster burgeoning commercial ventures into satellite remote sensing. One of her major research projects looks at the ongoing economic—as well as privacy, security, and other—implications of American companies selling images photographed by privately owned satellites in outer space. Her other research projects are exploring the use of economic incentives to manage space debris; the allocation of scarce energy, water, utilities, and telecommunications resources on the ISS; the value of geostationary orbit; and the value of information, particularly information derived from space-based remote sensing. She was a member of the Space Studies Board’s Task Group on Setting Priorities for Space Research and the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on the Impact of Selling the Federal Helium Reserve. She also served on the NRC’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board’s Committee for the Assessment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Space Solar Power Investment Strategy. John S. MacDonald is a consultant and chair of the Institute for Pacific Ocean Science and Technology. He is one of the founders of MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates (MDA) Ltd. Dr. MacDonald was responsible for all aspects of business operations, overall strategic leadership, technical leadership, and market positioning worldwide. His interests lie in the areas of advanced digital systems engineering, remote sensing, and image processing. He led the design team for the first Landsat ground-processing system produced by MDA, Ltd., and was involved in the early development of synthetic aperture radar processing at this

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company. His technical activities have been in the areas of information extraction from advanced sensor systems and the applications of remote sensing, with particular emphasis on the physics of the backscatter process and the use of integrated data sets as a means of increasing the ability to extract useful information from remotely sensed data. Jay S. Pearlman is development team manager at TRW, Inc. His background includes basic research, program management, and program development in sensors and systems. He has played an important role in the development and implementation of new concepts and capabilities for both the military and the civil sectors of the U.S. government. He is currently working on the EO-1 Hyperion sensor as principal investigator and is actively involved with the EO-1 Science Validation Team in assessing the benefits of hyperspectral imagery. He is also involved in an assessment of the viability of multispectral and hyperspectral commercial applications. WORKSHOP SPEAKERS AND PANELISTS G. Bryan Bailey is principal remote sensing scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey’s EROS Data Center (EDC), near Sioux Falls, South Dakota. He holds B.A. and M.S. degrees in geology from the University of Iowa and a Ph.D. in mineral exploration from Stanford University. Prior to joining the EROS program in 1978, Dr. Bailey spent 4 years with ASARCO, Inc., conducting base and precious metal exploration in the western United States. During his career at the EDC, Dr. Bailey has been responsible for conducting and directing research and applications development in the field of geologic remote sensing, and he has been involved extensively in program development and implementation at EDC, particularly as it relates to USGS and EDC involvement in the Landsat and Earth Observing System (EOS) programs. As EDC Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) project scientist, he was responsible for liaison between the EDC DAAC and the EOS and global change science communities throughout the development, implementation, and operation of DAAC systems and capabilities. He continues to provide scientific and programmatic liaison between the EDC DAAC and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) science team and project, including participating as validation scientist for two ASTER DEM standard data product validation sites. Currently, Dr. Bailey is responsible for initiating and leading USGS activities designed to expand and enhance beneficial use of remotely sensed data throughout the USGS. He is the author of many scientific publications and other program- and policy-related papers. Donna Boreck works as a mitigation specialist with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Prior to coming to FEMA, she worked as a

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research scientist on geologic and environmental issues involved in development of energy and mineral resources. More recent work has addressed drinking water protection and assessing health risks. She has a bachelor’s degree in geology from Colorado State University and a master’s degree in geology from the Colorado School of Mines. She has published over 20 papers in her field. Mark Bosworth has 10 years of active work experience in geographic information systems (GIS) technology. After graduating from Hunter College in New York with a bachelor’s degree in cartography and a master’s degree in analytical cartography and remote sensing, Mr. Bosworth moved to Portland, Oregon, and joined the Data Resource Center (DRC) at Metro as a GIS specialist. As a GIS program supervisor at Metro, he manages all of the Data Resource Center’s public interfaces, including development of an electronic GIS storefront on Metro’s Web site (www.metro-region.org), the DRC’s map counter services, and ongoing development of Metro map products. Mr. Bosworth also serves as Metro’s GIS liaison with state and national transportation agencies. He has made presentations to local, regional, state, and national GIS audiences on regional strategies for public participation in GIS, sharing of data on roads, generic linear reference systems, and Metro’s Regional Land Information System. He has published technical papers on address geocoding, systems administration in GIS, and road data sharing strategies. He is particularly interested in how public participation in GIS can be enhanced and what the impact will be on cartographic data structures and access policies. Patrick Bresnahan is currently the geographic information officer for Richland County, South Carolina. He is an American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) certified mapping scientist in GIS/land information systems and a member of NASA’s Program Planning and Analysis Panel. Currently, he co-chairs the technology subcommittee of the South Carolina State Mapping Advisory Committee. He earned a bachelor’s degree (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), a master’s degree (Indiana State University), and a Ph.D. (University of South Carolina) in geography, and he participated in the Postgraduate Research Program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and later was awarded a postdoctoral research fellowship sponsored by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. His postdoctoral research was conducted at the DOE Savannah River facility. Dr. Bresnahan also received fellowship awards from Automated Mapping and Facilities Management International (now Geospatial Information and Technology Association (GITA)) and NASA under the South Carolina Space Grant Consortium. He maintains membership in ASPRS, the Association of American Geographers, GITA, and Sigma Xi and has remained active in those organizations through numerous conference presentations and publication of research results in Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing.

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Andrew J. Bruzewicz is director of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Remote Sensing/GIS Center, Hanover, New Hampshire, and acting associate technical director for Geospatial Research and Development. He manages the Corps’s civil works geospatial research and development program area (survey and mapping, remote sensing, and GIS) and is currently involved in the creation of new approaches to the development and life-cycle support of science and engineering technology products. His primary professional interests are the integration of remote sensing and GIS into the Corps’s mission areas, with particular emphasis on emergency management, data sharing within and between agencies, and remote sensing and GIS education. Peter Conrad is a GIS coordinator/environmental planner for the Baltimore City Department of Planning. He holds a bachelor’s degree in political science with an environmental studies minor from the University of Florida and a master’s degree in urban and regional planning from the University of Wisconsin. He joined the Baltimore City Department of Planning in 1987, working as a community planner from 1987 to 1993. He became an environmental planner in 1993 and began work with GIS in 1998. He is coordinating several GIS projects, including conflation of 2000 Census geography, analysis of Baltimore’s neighborhood real estate market, and development of a multiattribute land use map for mapping forest areas. Mr. Conrad is also assisting the Maryland Department of Natural Resources in using IKONOS imagery to map natural land cover, including forests, in Baltimore City. These data will be used for a variety of purposes, including a citywide natural resource inventory, planning for urban reforestation, and the development of a land use/land cover map for Baltimore. John Dorman is currently assistant director for emergency management—hazards mapping, information, and management. His work involves floodplain mapping, floodplain management, flood warning, development and management of geographic information systems that support Hazard US (HAZUS) development and mapping, and antiterrorism planning and mitigation, among other responsibilities. Previously, he was administrator for planning in the North Carolina Office of State Budget, Planning and Management, where he was responsible for statewide strategic planning and evaluation; sociodemographic data and demography; the Center for Geographic Information and Analysis; the North Carolina Geodetic Survey; and the North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program. Former positions also included deputy state planning director, North Carolina Office of State Planning. In June 2001, the state of North Carolina, through the North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program, received the Tom Lee State Award for Excellence–Platinum Level from the Association of State Floodplain Managers. This award is given annually to recognize an outstanding floodplain management program or activity at the state level.

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David Ekern is associate director of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials and assistant commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Transportation. He is currently on assignment to the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, focusing on initiatives that are changing the face of our nation’s transportation agencies. Focus areas include intelligent transportation systems, asset management, remote sensing technologies, operations management, and context-sensitive design. At the Minnesota Department of Transportation, he has served as assistant commissioner for national and international programs, division director of engineering services, and assistant chief engineer, and as a district engineer. He also has held positions in environmental policy and planning, preliminary design, MPO and regional planning, and highway maintenance. He is a member of numerous professional associations and societies and is a registered professional engineer. Mr. Ekern received a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Minnesota and an M.B.A. from the University of St. Thomas. Joe Engeln is the assistant director for science and technology at the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. In this position, he advises the director on a broad range of interdisciplinary environmental issues and on data management. The department is the delegated state agency for environmental quality and operates the state parks, historical sites, and soils program. Prior to joining the department in 1999, he was an associate professor of geological sciences at the University of Missouri. From 1990 to 1992, Dr. Engeln was the acting geodynamics program scientist at NASA Headquarters. He has written papers on seismology, tectonics, hydrology, geodesy, marine geophysics, geodynamics, and remote sensing. Amanda Hargis, currently the GIS coordinator for Boulder County, Colorado, has been working with GIS since 1989. In her enthusiasm for GIS, she has been involved in organizing local and national GIS conferences for several years. She also facilitates the Boulder Area Spatial Information Co-op (BASIC), which is a regional group of agencies that share digital information such as parcels, air photos, and other imagery. Michael Hove is data processing coordinator for the North Dakota State Water Commission, where he has worked for 25 years. He has worked on five projects with lidar data over the last 3 years, using lidar to collect detailed topographic data and help understand overland water flow. The primary focus of the Water Commission is ground water and surface water resource management. Mr. Hove holds a bachelor’s degree in computer science. Charles Hutchinson is acting director of the Division of Applications for NASA’s Office of Earth Science. Dr. Hutchinson is a professor in the Arid Lands

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Resources Sciences Program at the University of Arizona, where he also serves as director of the Arizona Remote Sensing Center and associate director of the Office of Arid Lands Studies in the College of Agriculture. Previously, Dr. Hutchinson held positions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the USGS Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Program Office. His research has focused on the use of remote-sensing and geographic information system technology for monitoring environmental change and food security issues in arid lands, focusing largely on conditions in the American Southwest and in Africa. Dr. Hutchinson serves as the executive editor for the Journal of Arid Environ ments and is executive secretary for the International Committee on Remote Sensing of the Environment, International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. He holds a Ph.D. in geography from the University of California at Riverside. Jeff Liedtke has been actively involved in the geotechnology industry for more than 15 years. As director of market planning for DigitalGlobe, Inc., he is responsible for identifying and leveraging core technology and partnerships to develop products and markets. Prior to that, he was the product marketing manager at Space Imaging, Inc., for IKONOS, Landsat, Indian Remote Sensing, and value-added products. He provided business development, including international project management, development of remote sensing and digital photogrammetry software and hardware systems, and sales and marketing for International Imaging Systems. Previously, he also worked for the Los Padres National Forest to develop a GIS database in mapping, hydrology, soils, geology, and fire management, producing maps for all land management prescription scenarios. Mr. Liedtke holds B.A. degrees in geography and environmental studies from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and an M.S. in remote sensing from Simon Fraser University, B.C., Canada. Don Light is a senior consultant for mapping and remote sensing companies. Previously, he was manager of business development at Emerge and manager of business development for commercial remote sensing at Eastman Kodak. Mr. Light’s background includes a number of professional positions in defense and civilian mapping and private sector companies. Mr. Light served in the 30th Engineer Topographic Battalion from 1953 to 1955, was a member of NASA’s Apollo Photo Team and the Large Format Camera Team, and served as chief of the Advanced Technology Division at the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) Topographic Center and as the technical director of the Defense Mapping School. After an assignment at the Office of Technology Assessment, where he worked on a study of National Space Policy and Remote Sensing Applications, he transferred to the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS’s) National Mapping Division as chief of the Branch of Systems Development. In 1987, he became chief, Office of Production Contract Management, where he was responsible for the National

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Aerial Photography Program, the Airborne Radar Imagery Program, initiation of the Digital Orthophoto Program, and the National Camera Calibration Laboratory. In 1991, he was awarded the Department of the Interior Meritorious Service Citation for excellence in managing the USGS imaging programs. He has a long affiliation with the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), including serving as director of the Primary Data Acquisition Division, and also served as co-chair of the International Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Working Group on Mapping from High Resolution Imagery, and is a member of the ISPRS editorial board. Mr. Light became an ASPRS Photogrammetric Fellow in 2000. He holds a B.S. in geodetic and cartographic science from George Washington University, as well as a graduate diploma in strategy and management from the U.S. Naval War College and a diploma from the Federal Executive Institute. Michael Renslow is the vice president of Spencer B. Gross, Inc. (SBG). He has 34 years of experience in the mapping sciences as an engineering surveyor, professional cartographer, photogrammetrist, aerial photographer, and business manager. He worked for the Department of Defense, the U.S. Forest Service, and two prominent aerial photography firms before joining SBG in 1995. He is a 1971 graduate of San Francisco State University with a B.S. in geography and training in civil engineering and geology. Mr. Renslow serves as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Oregon Geography Department, teaching courses in remote sensing. He has recognized expertise in lidar (light detection and ranging) mapping technology and is currently conducting research to characterize and measure forest biometrics and wildlife habitat zones. Rebecca Storey is a contractor with the Denver Regional Office of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Her professional work with FEMA began in 1994 with the January 1994 Northridge Earthquake in California, for which she supported the Human Services program area by processing federal assistance to disaster victims. She has also served as disaster reservist in Aberdeen, South Dakota, where she prepared GIS mapping of roads inundated in a flood disaster, and as the technical services branch chief during the Susquehanna River flood in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. In addition, Ms. Storey produced mapping with georeferenced sites of dams and culverts connected to major rivers in several flooded North Dakota counties for the FEMA Regional Office in Denver, and in January 1997 she served as a co-GIS coordinator for flooding in Salem, Oregon, before being deployed to North Dakota in response to the Grand Forks flood of record to produce GIS for disaster management staff. Prior to joining FEMA, Ms. Storey served as a city planner for 4 years. David Thibault is executive vice president of Earth Satellite Corporation (EarthSat). He has been a member of the technical and management staff since

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1971 and provides leadership for financial and long-range planning, as well as business development. Mr. Thibault’s broad background in public administration and policy making at the state and federal levels of government has been expanded at EarthSat on projects designed to apply remote sensing technology to operational programs and long-range planning. Mr. Thibault served as director of research in the Massachusetts governor’s office and on a White House task force directed at improving federal-state relations. At the U.S. Department of Commerce from 1968 to 1971, he served as special assistant in the Office of the Secretary, where he worked on the departmental programs, including regional economic development. Mr. Thibault has had responsibility for many of EarthSat’s state and local projects. Melanie Wallendorf is Eller Professor of Marketing in the College of Business and Public Administration at the University of Arizona. She received an M.A. in sociology in 1977 and a Ph.D. in marketing in 1979, both from the University of Pittsburgh. Her research focuses on sociological aspects of consumer behavior. In particular, Dr. Wallendorf’s research has made pioneering contributions to the study of consumption using ethnographic research methods. For over two decades, she has published extensively on the sociocultural meanings of consumption, including the role of possessions in socially constituting social classes and ethnic groups, the meanings of favorite possessions and of collections, the processes that define particular possessions as sacred or profane, and the impact of social ties on the diffusion of innovations. In 1992 she won the Association for Consumer Research Award for the best article in the Journal of Consumer Re search 1989-1991 for her article “The Sacred and the Profane in Consumer Behavior: Theodicy on the Odyssey” (co-authored with Russell Belk and John F. Sherry, Jr.). Robert A. Wright is the assistant information technology division manager for GIS for the Washington Department of Natural Resources. Previous positions include principal consultant for R.A. Wright and Associates, a remote-sensing marketing group, and director of reseller marketing and director of product marketing, providing worldwide marketing management for EarthWatch, Inc.’s. QuickBird satellite imagery products. In addition, Mr. Wright has also provided system integration, consulting, marketing, and remote sensing/GIS support for Atterbury Consultants, Inc., and served as the director of NW Operations for Computer Sciences Corporation, providing GIS systems integration and related services in support of the company’s GIS Center of Excellence and on several major contracts. Mr. Wright served as the land information systems manager for Infotec Development, Inc., and directed the development of its LIS/GIS business area. In addition, he has served as the state office GIS manager for the Oregon State Office of the Bureau of Land Management; as GIS coordinator for the Portland Area Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs; and as area forester and

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agency forester in California and New Mexico locations over a 25-year career with the Department of the Interior. He graduated with a B.S. in forest management from Oregon State University. He is a member of the Society of American Foresters and of ASPRS and was secretary-treasurer, vice president, and president of the Columbia River Chapter of ASPRS, 1996-1998; national director, 1999; treasurer of the GIS in Action conference, ASPRS 1999; National Conference assistant director; Rocky Mountain region secretary and vice president, 2000-2001; Puget Sound Region vice president, 2001; and president elect, 2002. Jeff Young, executive director for Global Solutions Sales Space at Imaging, Inc., is responsible for sales of Earth imagery and value-added information products, services, and solutions. He has more than 25 years of experience in sales, as well as program and project experience, including more than 12 years in senior management of GIS corporations. Before joining Space Imaging, Mr. Young worked for Bentley Systems, Inc., as an account manager for the Government and Transportation programs. Prior to that, he held numerous professional positions in the GIS and remote-sensing field, including president of the Criminal Justice Business Unit at Graphic Data Systems; project manager and senior GIS consultant for the Program Administration Group; GIS consultant with HDR, Inc.; and scientific supervisor and principal investigator for Lockheed Engineering and Management Services Company. Mr. Young holds an M.A. degree in geography from Arizona State University and a B.S. in geography from Lock Haven University.