B
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers

Clifton A. Poodry is the Director of the Minority Opportunities in Research (MORE) Division at the National Institute for General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) at the National Institutes of Health. He is responsible for developing and implementing NIGMS policies and plans for minority research and research training programs. Prior to assuming this position in 1994, he was a Professor of Biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Poodry is a native of Tonawanda Seneca Indian Reservation in Western New York. He earned both a B.A. and an M.A. in Biology at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and received a Ph.D. in Biology from Case Western Reserve University. He was the 1995 recipient of the Ely S. Parker Award from the American Indian Science and Engineering Society for contributions in science and service to the American Indian community.

Sylvia Hurtado, Associate Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, conducts research on understanding diverse college contexts for the success of diverse college students. Her roles include research and teaching at University of Michigan’s Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education (since 1992). She was a University of California Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow for the Sociology Department and Research Analyst for the Higher Education Research Institute and the Center for the Study of Evaluation at University of California, Los Angeles. Other administrative experience includes Assistant to the Dean, Division of Graduate Studies and Research at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1983-1986); Special Assistant to the Director of Admissions at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1982-1983); and Assistant Regional Director of Admissions at Princeton University (1980-1982). She obtained a Ph.D. in education from the University of California, Los Angeles (1990), an A.B. in sociology from Princeton University (1980), and an Ed.M. from Harvard Graduate School of Education (1983).

She has served on the Board for the American Association of Higher Education, the Midwest Consortium for Latino Research, the Association for the Study of Higher Education, and the Council of



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Minorities in the Chemical Workforce: Diversity Models that Work - A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable B Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakers Clifton A. Poodry is the Director of the Minority Opportunities in Research (MORE) Division at the National Institute for General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) at the National Institutes of Health. He is responsible for developing and implementing NIGMS policies and plans for minority research and research training programs. Prior to assuming this position in 1994, he was a Professor of Biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Dr. Poodry is a native of Tonawanda Seneca Indian Reservation in Western New York. He earned both a B.A. and an M.A. in Biology at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and received a Ph.D. in Biology from Case Western Reserve University. He was the 1995 recipient of the Ely S. Parker Award from the American Indian Science and Engineering Society for contributions in science and service to the American Indian community. Sylvia Hurtado, Associate Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education, conducts research on understanding diverse college contexts for the success of diverse college students. Her roles include research and teaching at University of Michigan’s Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education (since 1992). She was a University of California Presidential Postdoctoral Fellow for the Sociology Department and Research Analyst for the Higher Education Research Institute and the Center for the Study of Evaluation at University of California, Los Angeles. Other administrative experience includes Assistant to the Dean, Division of Graduate Studies and Research at the University of California, Santa Cruz (1983-1986); Special Assistant to the Director of Admissions at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1982-1983); and Assistant Regional Director of Admissions at Princeton University (1980-1982). She obtained a Ph.D. in education from the University of California, Los Angeles (1990), an A.B. in sociology from Princeton University (1980), and an Ed.M. from Harvard Graduate School of Education (1983). She has served on the Board for the American Association of Higher Education, the Midwest Consortium for Latino Research, the Association for the Study of Higher Education, and the Council of

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Minorities in the Chemical Workforce: Diversity Models that Work - A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable Division J (Postsecondary Education) of the American Educational Research Association. She was recently named among the top 15 influential faculty whose work has had an impact in the field by Black Issues in Higher Education. Dr. Hurtado has published articles and research reports related to her primary interest in student educational outcomes, campus climates, and diverse students in higher education. Her recent books are entitled Enacting Diverse Learning Environments (Jossey-Bass, 1999), and a coauthored book Intergroup Dialogue (University of Michigan Press, 2001). She has written numerous articles on student transition to college, access, and on creating campus climates for learning among diverse peers. She also serves on the editorial boards of the American Educational Research Journal, Journal of Higher Education, Sociology of Education, and was associate editor of the Review of Higher Education. Dr. Hurtado has coordinated several national research projects, including a federally sponsored project on how colleges are preparing college students to achieve the cognitive, social, and democratic skills to participate in a diverse democracy. She is also studying assessment, reform, and innovation in undergraduate education on a project through the National Center for Postsecondary Improvement; she also conducted the National Study of Hispanic College Students, in which she studied several longitudinal cohorts of Latino students entering college in the 1990s. Cornelia D. Gillyard is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at Spelman College and is currently serving as the Chair of the Department of Chemistry. She earned a B.A. in chemistry from Talladega College and M.S. and D.A. degrees in organic chemistry from Atlanta University. Prior to coming to Spelman, Professor Gillyard worked as a research chemist at Battelle Labs in Columbus, Ohio, and in the Nuclear Medicine Laboratory at Ohio State University. At Spelman, Professor Gillyard is involved with students in classroom teaching, mentoring, academic advising, and in directed research. Her current research activities and interests include the study of organoarsenicals (synthesis and characterization) and the use of spectroscopic analytical procedures for monitoring environmental pollutants and toxins. She has received research and training grants from several agencies, including NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy, Kellogg Foundation, Bureau of Mines, National Institutes of Health, and the National Science Foundation (NSF). Professor Gillyard’s mentoring activities include service as the Director of the NASA Women in Science and Engineering Scholars Program, Co-Project Director of the NSF Research Careers for Minority Students-scholars in chemistry program and Director of the Spelman College Summer Science Program and participates on local and national panels and programs directed toward encouraging young women to pursue advanced degrees in science. Her professional involvement includes service and membership in the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) and the American Chemical Society (ACS) (Women Chemists Committee, ACS Scholars Selection Committee, Blue-Ribbon Advisory Panel for Ministry Affairs, Student Affiliates Task Force, and Committee on Professional Training). Michael F. Summers is Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Adjunct Professor of Biological Chemistry at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore. He received his B.S. degree in chemistry from the University of West Florida, his Ph.D. degree from Emory University, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Summers’ research in the area of nuclear magnetic resonance studies of complex biosystems is at the forefront of biomedical research. Each summer approximately 20 undergraduates work in his laboratory. They are given the same responsibilities as graduate students, completing their own projects

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Minorities in the Chemical Workforce: Diversity Models that Work - A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable and becoming coauthors and first authors in major scientific journals. Dr. Summers also directs the Meyerhoff graduate program for high-achieving minority graduate students. The program now includes 26 minority students. To date, more than 100 graduate and undergraduate students’ articles have been published by Dr. Summers’ mentees. In 1999, nine of Dr. Summers’ students, including seven African Americans, graduated and were admitted to Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D. programs at leading universities. The research facility under the direction of Dr. Summers is a national model for producing large numbers of high-achieving African American students in areas of vital importance to the nation. Steven F. Watkins is Associate Professor of Chemistry at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He received his B.A. degree from Pomona College and his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin (Madison). His research specialty is in structural/materials chemistry using x-ray diffraction, and he has published more than 80 papers. From 1990 to 2000, he was Director of Graduate Studies in the Louisiana State University Chemistry Department. Freeman A. Hrabowski III has served as President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County since May 1992. His research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance. Born in 1950 in Birmingham, Alabama, Dr. Hrabowski graduated at age 19 from Hampton Institute with highest honors in mathematics, and he received his M.A. (mathematics) and Ph.D. (higher education administration/statistics) at age 24 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He serves as a consultant to the NSF, the U.S. Department of Education, and universities and school systems nationally, and he sits on numerous corporate and civic boards. Dr. Hrabowski serves as a consultant to the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Department of Education, and universities and school systems nationally. He is a member of numerous boards, including the American Council on Education, Baltimore Community Foundation, Maryland High-Technology Council, and the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. He is past president of the Maryland Humanities Council. D. Ronald Webb received his B.Ed. in biological sciences from Miami University in 1971. Following eight years of biological research at Procter & Gamble (P&G) on insecticides, herbicides, plant growth regulators, and antimicrobials, he entered graduate school and obtained a Ph.D. in toxicology from the University of Arizona in 1984. He returned to P&G at that time and assumed positions of increasing responsibility as a toxicologist, product development scientist, and Section Head in Regulatory & Clinical Development. From 1988 to 1998, Dr. Webb had primary responsibility for obtaining national and international regulatory approval for the use of new food additives and food ingredients. During this time period, he also served as a scientific outreach representative for academic institutions, professional societies, the media, and state and local government affairs. In 1999, Dr. Webb was appointed Senior Manager of Doctoral Recruiting, with direct responsibility for recruiting Ph.D., Pharm.D., D.D.S., D.V.M, and M.D. candidates for all of P&G’s U.S. R&D organizations and coordination responsibilities for doctoral recruiting worldwide. In 2001 he was appointed Manager, Doctoral Recruiting and University Relations, in recognition of his increasing level of responsibility in P&G’s external relations organization. Dr.Webb also serves as a company representative for national industry associations and as a P&G spokesperson with a number of professional societies.

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Minorities in the Chemical Workforce: Diversity Models that Work - A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable James D. Burke retired in 2001 from Rohm and Haas Company, where he was Manager of Technical Recruiting and University Relations, with responsibility for scientific and engineering recruiting for his company’s U.S. locations and for managing university relations programs. In addition to working in synthesis and product development research for seven years, Dr. Burke accumulated 25 years of experience in recruiting and career development programs. He has frequently lectured on these and related topics at various campuses, college placement conferences, and ACS meetings. A past chair of the Philadelphia Section ACS, Dr. Burke has been an ACS councilor, an ACS career consultant, and is active in his local section. He was Chair of the ACS Committee on Economic and Professional Affairs and the ACS Committee on Local Section Activities. He currently serves on the ACS Board of Directors and is a member of its Executive Committee, Planning Committee and Strategic Alliances Subcommittee, and Professional & Member Relations Committee. He also chairs the Society Committee on Budget and Finance. Dr. Burke received his B.S. degree in chemistry at Spring Hill College in 1961 and his Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 1965 at the University of California, Berkeley, where he was an NSF Predoctoral Fellow. Before joining Rohm and Haas as a Senior Research Scientist, he was a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow at Columbia University. Dr. Burke’s awards include the ACS Division of Professional Relations Henry Hill Award, the Philadelphia Section ACS Ullyot Award, the National Association of Colleges and Employers Employer of the Year Award, Midwest Association of Colleges and Employers Honorary Life Member, and the Big Brother Big Sister Association of Philadelphia’s Charles Edwin Fox Award.