APPENDIXES



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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 APPENDIXES

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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 This page in the original is blank.

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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members John W. Lyons, NAE, Chair, consultant and retired director of the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), is a Ph.D. physical chemist. He served in research and development positions with the Monsanto Company for 18 years. In 1973 he joined the Commerce Department’s National Bureau of Standards (NBS). At NBS, Lyons was the first director of the Center for Fire Research. In 1990 Dr. Lyons was appointed by President George H.W. Bush to be the ninth director of NBS, by that time renamed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In September 1993, he was appointed the first permanent director of ARL. At ARL, Dr. Lyons managed a broad array of science and technology programs. He has served on many boards and commissions, inter alia, the Federal Advisory Commission on Consolidation and Conversion of Defense Research and Development Laboratories. He currently serves on two boards of visitors at the University of Maryland. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Army Science and Technology, as well as a member of a congressionally chartered committee at the National Defense University to study the potential effectiveness of the DoD laboratories in the transformed military of the future. Dr. Lyons was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1985. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Washington Academy of Science and is a member of the American Chemical Society and of Sigma Xi. George Bugliarello, NAE, is presently chancellor of Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, New York. Dr. Bugliarello, a former president (1973-1994) of Polytechnic, an engineer and educator whose background ranges from biomedical

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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 engineering to fluid mechanics, computer languages, socio-technology, and science policy, is a leader of the Urban Security Initiative at Polytechnic. A member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the Council on Foreign Relations and a founding fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, he is a past president of the Sigma Xi, the scientific research society, and holds honorary lifetime membership in the National Association for Science, Technology, and Society (NASTS). He has served as both member and chair of several National Research Council committees, among the latest of which were chairmanship of the Committee on Alternative Technologies to Replace Anti-Personnel Landmines, and membership in the Committee on Human Rights of the National Academy of Sciences, NAE, and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He is currently a member of the National Research Council Committee on Counterterrorism Challenges for Russia and the United States. Dr. Bugliarello’s international experience includes consultancies abroad for United Nations Economic and Social Commission and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, being the U.S. member of the Science for Peace Steering Group of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and, previously, of NATO’s Science for Stability Steering Group. Timothy Coffey currently holds the Edison Chair at the Center for Technology and National Security Policy at the National Defense University and is a senior research scientist at the University of Maryland. He graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1962 with a B.S. degree in electrical engineering and obtained his M.S. (1963) and Ph.D. (1967), both in physics, from the University of Michigan. During his graduate career, Dr. Coffey worked as a research assistant at the University of California (1963-1964), a research physicist at the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories (1964-1965), and a teaching fellow and research assistant in physics at the University of Michigan (1965-1966). As a scientific consultant for EG&G, Inc. (1966-1971), he was involved in investigations in theoretical and mathematical physics. Dr. Coffey joined the Naval Research Laboratory in 1971 as head of the Plasma Dynamics Branch, Plasma Physics Division. In this position, he directed research in the simulation of plasma instabilities, the development of multidimensional fluid and magneto-hydrodynamic codes, and the development of computer codes for treating chemically reactive flows. In 1975, he was named superintendent, Plasma Physics Division; he was appointed associate director of research for General Science and Technology on January 1, 1980. On November 28, 1982, he was named Director of Research. In October 2001 Dr. Coffey retired from the Naval Research Laboratory and joined the University of Maryland. Dr. Coffey conducted research on the theory of nonlinear oscillations and played a major role in the national program on high-altitude nuclear effects. The author or coauthor of over 70 publications and reports, he has made several fundamental contributions to the theory of electron beam/plasma interaction and to the understanding of plasma processes in

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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 Earth’s ionosphere. Dr. Coffey is a fellow of the American Physical Society, of the Franklin Institute, and of the Washington Academy of Science and a member of the American Institute of Physics, of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and of Sigma Xi. In 1981, he was awarded the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive. He was awarded the Presidential Rank of Distinguished Executive in 1987 and 1994. In 1991, Dr. Coffey was the recipient of the Delmer S. Fahrney Medal and received the Department of Defense Distinguished Civilian Service Award. On March 14, 1996, he was awarded the Senior Executives Association Professional Development League’s 1995 Executive Excellence Award for Distinguished Executive Service. In August 2000, he was awarded the Navy’s prestigious Captain Robert Dexter Conrad Award. Dr. Coffey was selected by Irish American Magazine as one of the top 100 Irish Americans for the year 2000. Upon his retirement from the Naval Research Laboratory, he was awarded the Laboratory’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Stephen W. Drew, NAE, currently spreads his efforts between professorships at Princeton and Cambridge Universities and consultancies with a variety of pharmaceutical and biotechnology organizations. Until 2000, he worked with Merck & Company, Inc., in a series of increasingly responsible positions culminating as the distinguished senior scientist. Dr. Drew received his Ph.D. in biochemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. A member of the NAE, he has served in several capacities within the NAE itself and assisted numerous National Research Council committees. Mitra Dutta currently serves as professor and head of electrical and computer engineering, as well as adjunct professor of physics, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from India (Delhi University) and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Cincinnati, in Ohio. She has held appointments at the College of Arts and Sciences at Kingston, Jamaica, in the West Indies, postdoctoral appointments at Purdue University and the City College of New York, and adjunct professor appointments at Rutgers University, the University of Maryland, North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Brookhaven National Laboratory. She worked for 10 years at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory in various capacities, and prior to joining the faculty of the University of Illinois, Dr. Dutta served in a senior executive service position in the Army Research Office (ARO), now a component of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. She has authored or coauthored over 350 publications and presentations, holds 26 U.S. and Canadian patents, has coedited two books and is a coauthor of a third. She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and of the Optical Society of America and was the recipient of the IEEE Harry Diamond Award in 2000. Her interests include the electrical, optical, and mechanical properties of nanostructures, quantum transport, solid-state electronics and optoelectronics,

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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 phonons in nanostructures, theory of nanodevices, and applications of nanoscale structures and devices in electrical engineering and bioengineering. Frederick L. Frostic is currently a principal with Booz Allen Hamilton. Prior to joining Booz Allen, he served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Requirements and Plans, where he was responsible for preparing the Defense Planning Guidance, supervised the Defense Department’s response to the congressionally mandated Commission on Roles and Missions, and conducted crisis planning, plans reviews, and force structure analysis. Recently, he was the project manager of a group providing research to the U.S. Commission on National Security/21st Century (Hart-Rudman Commission). In this effort, his team wrote the implementation plan for the commission’s recommendations on homeland security. Additionally he was the project manager to provide research support to the Presidential Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection. Mr. Frostic, a graduate of the Air Force Academy, earned an M.S. in engineering from the University of Michigan in 1971 and conducted postgraduate work in aerospace engineering until 1976. C. William Gear, NAE, is president emeritus of the NEC Research Institute. Prior to joining NEC, he was head of the Department of Computer Science and professor of computer science and applied mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research expertise is in numerical analysis and computational software. Dr. Gear is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, IEEE, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He served as president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and was the recipient of the ACM SIGNUM George E. Forsythe Memorial Award and Fulbright and Johnson Foundation Fellowships. Arthur H. Heuer, NAE, is University Professor and the Kyocera Professor of Ceramics at Case Western Reserve University. His interests include microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), phase transformations and dislocations in ceramics, rapid prototyping, structure/property/function studies of biological ceramics (teeth, shell, and bones), and the applications of biological processes to the processing of advanced ceramics. He received a B.S. in chemistry from the City College of New York, a Ph.D. in applied science, and a D.Sc. in physical ceramics from the University of Leeds, England. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and an external member of the Max Planck Institute for Material Science, Stuttgart, Germany. Howard S. Levine is a principal with Weidlinger Associates, Inc. His responsibilities include analysis of ground motion and structural response from nuclear and conventional explosions, aircraft impact, and earthquakes. Dr. Levine is

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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 currently leading development and analysis efforts in air blast, fragment, and ground shock loading of hardened reinforced concrete structures, deep tunnels in rock, and aboveground industrial structures subjected to conventional weapons effects. He received a B.S. in aerospace engineering, an M.S. in applied mechanics, and a Ph.D. in applied mechanics, all from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. Dr. Levine has numerous affiliations that include the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Xi, and Sigma Gamma Tau. Joseph P. Mackin, a retired Army Acquisition Corps colonel, is currently president of E-OIR Technologies, Inc., a high-technology sensor applications company in Virginia. He has an extensive background in sensors, having served in many DoD sensor development and acquisition assignments such as deputy division director of the Laser Division at the Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate; as product manager for the Army’s second generation FLIR (thermal imager) for the Abrams Tank and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle; and as the Director of Special Programs on the staff of the Army Acquisition Executive. Since retiring from the Army and prior to accepting his current position, he worked at MIT/Lincoln Laboratory as an assistant group leader in the Sensors Applications Group, where he was the technical lead for the Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Science and Technology’s (DUSD S&T) Smart Sensor Web program. His education includes a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, an M.S. in physics (electro-optics) from the Naval Postgraduate School, and a Ph.D. in physics (atomic and lasers) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also a graduate of the Defense Systems Management College. Jack N. Merritt serves concurrently as chairman of the Marshall Legacy Institute, director and vice chairman of the Atlantic Council of the United States, director and vice chairman of the George C. Marshall Foundation, and is on the Board of Visitors for the International Center of the University of Oklahoma. A retired U.S. Army general, he was most recently the president and chief operating officer of the Association of the United States Army. General Merritt has had a long and distinguished military career, during which he progressed from the grade of private to four-star general. A former Director of the Joint Staff and Commandant of the United States Army War College, General Merritt’s final assignment prior to military retirement was as the U.S. military representative to NATO. He received a B.M.S. from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, an M.S. in business administration from the George Washington University, and was a graduate of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Thomas E. Mitchell is vice president of Gray Hawk Systems, Inc., in Alexandria, Virginia, where he leads the Operations, Intelligence, and Security Division.

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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 Mr. Mitchell, a retired U.S. Army colonel, is a business executive with an extensive background in special operations, crisis response, consequence management, force protection, and critical infrastructure protection. He serves in a strategic consultative role as a member of the Business Advisory Council of the Lexington Institute in Arlington, Virginia, and the Gray Hawk corporate board of directors. Mr. Mitchell received a B.S. from the University of Delaware and an M.P.A. from Jacksonville State University in Alabama. Additionally, he is a graduate of the Army’s Advanced Operational Studies War College Fellowship Program, School of Advanced Military Studies. K. David Nokes currently serves as vice president of the National Security and Arms Control Division at Sandia National Laboratories. He has extensive experience in the design of nuclear weapon systems, arms control, intelligence, and other national security activities. He served as the Special Scientific Advisor to the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense (Atomic Energy), providing advice on nuclear weapon safety, security, and reliability issues. After the break-up of the Soviet Union, he initiated dialogue with and developed programs of cooperation with the nuclear weapon design laboratories of the former Soviet Union, including programs to safeguard their nuclear materials and weapons. In the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, attacks, Mr. Nokes was designated as the Sandia point of contact for Sandia’s role in internal and external strategies for engaging Sandia’s technology base in problems associated with homeland security and combating terrorism. Mr. Nokes has an M.S. in applied mechanics and an M.S. in computer science and electrical engineering. Dennis J. Reimer is director of the National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism, Oklahoma City. The Institute is dedicated to preventing, reducing, and mitigating the effects of terrorism, with particular emphasis on the role of first responders. A retired U.S. Army general, he was most recently the 33rd Chief of Staff of the Army. He holds a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and a master’s degree from Shippensburg State College. Eugene Sevin, NAE, and a National Associate of the Academies, is a consultant on nuclear and conventional weapons effects, hardened facility design, and computational structural mechanics. He works with the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) on matters related to target vulnerability, blast mitigation, and high-performance computing in structural mechanics. Dr. Sevin was responsible for experimental research at the Defense Nuclear Agency (now DTRA) and established DTRA’s high-performance computing center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He served as director of space and missiles in the Office of the Undersecretary of Defense (Acquisition). Dr. Sevin received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology, an M.S. in mechanical engineering from the California

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Science and Technology for Army Homeland Security: Report 1 Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in applied mechanics from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Annette L. Sobel is a distinguished member of the technical staff of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, and Chemical and Biological Warfare analyst. She has 13 years of advanced technology development and unconventional threat analysis expertise focused on applications of biotechnology and information technologies in support of chemical-biological countermeasures and in the field of human factors/systems engineering (e.g., critical decision making under stress) domains. She is a Brigadier General in the U.S. Air Force Reserve and the Special Assistant for Weapons of Mass Destruction and Civil Support to the Chief of the National Guard Bureau. Her work has emphasized information analysis, advanced systems for mission rehearsal and training, human performance enhancements, and technology transition to field operational environments. She has 11 years of military command experience, including combat and chemical-biological warfare medical response unit commands. Dr. Sobel earned an M.D. at Case Western Reserve University, with specialization in family medicine at Duke University Medical Center. She has an M.S. in aerospace medicine with an emphasis on human factors engineering from Wright State University and a B.S. with high honors. She was a Founder’s Scholar in Chemistry and Computer Science at Cook College, Rutgers University. She is a member of the Defense Intelligence Agency’s advisory board. Michael F. Spigelmire is a consultant on crisis response, consequence management, and force protection. A retired U.S. Army lieutenant general, he has had a military career with a unique blend of conventional and special operations assignments. General Spigelmire commanded the U.S. Army’s Special Operations Command and then the VII Corps in Germany. Upon retirement, he was deputy director of operations for the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. This brought him into close contact with municipal, state, and federal officials. General Spigelmire holds a B.S. in political science from Loyola College and an M.A. in international relations from Georgetown University. Additionally, he has completed the U.S. Army Command and Staff College and the U.S. Army War College. General Spigelmire is currently the senior mentor for the Crisis Response, Consequence Management Senior Seminar, sponsored by the Joint Special Operations University and the Air Force Special Operations School, Hurlburt Field, Florida.