Appendix A
Forum Speaker Biosketches

Janice Bellace (New York Moderator) is the Samuel Blank Professor of Legal Studies and Professor of Legal Studies and Management at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where she joined the faculty in 1977. She is also director of the Huntsman Program in International Studies and Business, a unique four-year undergraduate course of study that integrates business education, advanced language training, and a liberal arts education.

From 1994–1999, she served as Wharton’s deputy dean, the school’s chief academic officer. In July 1999, Professor Bellace took a leave of absence from Penn to become the first president of Singapore Management University, Singapore’s newest university, which matriculated its first students in August 2000.

The author of numerous books, chapters, articles, and papers, Bellace’s research interests are in the field of labor and employment law, both domestic and international. Her most recent article on a non-U.S. topic is “The ILO Declaration of Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.”

Bellace is a member of the Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations of the International Labour Organization (ILO), a group of 20 scholars from around the world who report on compliance with fundamental labor and human rights standards.

Bellace received her bachelor’s and law degrees from the University of Pennsylvania. She holds a master’s degree from the London School of Economics, which she attended as a Thouron Scholar.



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Appendix A Forum Speaker Biosketches Janice Bellace (New York Moderator) is the Samuel Blank Professor of Legal Studies and Professor of Legal Studies and Management at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where she joined the faculty in 1977. She is also director of the Huntsman Program in International Studies and Business, a unique four-year undergraduate course of study that integrates business education, advanced language training, and a liberal arts education. From 1994–1999, she served as Wharton’s deputy dean, the school’s chief academic officer. In July 1999, Professor Bellace took a leave of absence from Penn to become the first president of Singapore Management University, Singapore’s newest university, which matriculated its first students in August 2000. The author of numerous books, chapters, articles, and papers, Bellace’s research interests are in the field of labor and employment law, both domestic and international. Her most recent article on a non-U.S. topic is “The ILO Declaration of Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.” Bellace is a member of the Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations of the International Labour Organization (ILO), a group of 20 scholars from around the world who report on compliance with fundamental labor and human rights standards. Bellace received her bachelor’s and law degrees from the University of Pennsylvania. She holds a master’s degree from the London School of Economics, which she attended as a Thouron Scholar.

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William B. Gould IV (Los Angeles Moderator) is the Charles A. Beardsley Professor of Law (Emeritus) at Stanford Law School and the William M. Ramsey Distinguished Professor of Law at Willamette University College of Law. He has been a member of the Stanford Law School faculty for three decades. Professor Gould was chairman of the National Labor Relations Board in Washington, DC, from 1994–1998. He has been an impartial arbitrator of labor–management disputes and conflicts since 1965 and a member of the National Academy of Arbitrators since 1970. Professor Gould received his law degree from Cornell Law School in 1961 and subsequently did graduate work in comparative labor law at the London School of Economics. The recipient of five honorary degrees, Professor Gould is the author of eight books and more than 50 law journal articles, including “Labor Law for a Global Economy: The Uneasy Case for International Labor Standards.” He has written numerous articles for general-circulation publications, such as the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the London Economist, the Manchester Guardian, and The Nation. One of his books, A Primer on American Labor Law (MIT Press, 3rd ed., 1993), was recognized with a Certificate of Merit from the American Bar Association Gavel Award Committee and has been translated into Chinese, Japanese, German, and Spanish. He is currently working on the fourth edition. Garrett D. Brown has an undergraduate degree in U.S. history from the University of Chicago and a Master in Public Health degree from the University of California at Berkeley. He is a certified industrial hygienist in comprehensive practice, as certified by the American Board of Industrial Hygiene. Mr. Brown currently works as a compliance officer in the Oakland District Office of the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA). In his nine years with Cal/OSHA, he has conducted more than 500 inspections in Alameda County; as part of statewide teams, he has inspected agricultural fields in California’s Central Valley and garment sweatshops in Los Angeles and Orange County. Since 1993, Mr. Brown has served on a volunteer basis as coordinator of the Maquiladora Health and Safety Support Network, which includes more than 400 occupational health and safety professionals in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. On a pro bono basis, the Network provides information, technical assistance, and Spanish-language training to community-based organizations of Mexican workers on the U.S.–Mexico border.

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Mr. Brown has published articles on global occupational health and safety issues in the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health, New Solutions, Multinational Monitor, Social Justice, The Synergist, and the Industrial Safety and Hygiene News. Peter Chapman is executive director of the Shareholder Association for Research and Education (SHARE). SHARE is a Canadian national not-for-profit organization helping pension funds build sound investment practices, protect the interest of plan beneficiaries, and contribute to a just and healthy society. Before joining SHARE, Mr. Chapman was the coordinator of the Canadian Friends Service Committee, the peace and service arm of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Canada. He has also held research positions with Project Ploughshares and the Taskforce on the Churches and Corporate Responsibility. Mr. Chapman served as a member of the Taskforce on Sustainable Forestry of the National Roundtable on the Environment and Economy, and he is a past director of the Social Investment Organization. Bipul Chattopadhyay is associate director at Consumer Unity & Trust Society (CUTS), a leading international nongovernmental organization on trade and economic issues headquartered in Jaipur, India. He heads the trade team of the CUTS Centre for International Trade, Economics & Environment. He is a graduate in economics from the Delhi School of Economics. Before joining CUTS in 1997, Mr. Chattopadhyay worked with several research institutes in Delhi, such as the Institute of Economic Growth and the Centre for Development Economics. His area of interest is the political economy of trade and development. Richard Clayton is a research analyst with the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Capital Stewardship Program. The SEIU is the largest union in the AFL-CIO, and it organizes workers in the building service, health care, and public service sectors. The Capital Stewardship Program works with institutional investors, including public pension funds, to develop investment policies that simultaneously ensure market rates of return while protecting the rights and interests of working people. Previously, Mr. Clayton was a doctoral candidate in government at Cornell University, where he worked in the fields of comparative politics and international political economy.

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Stephen Coats has been executive director of the U.S./Labor Education in the Americas Project since 1990. Previously, he worked for Bread for the World, a Christian citizens anti-hunger advocacy organization, for 13 years in various capacities, including assistant director and director of issues. He later served on Jesse Jackson’s 1988 presidential campaign as assistant policy director. He holds a Master of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary in New York City and has studied development economics in the political economy graduate program at the New School for Social Research. Tom DeLuca is vice president of imports, product development and compliance, for Toys “R” Us, Inc. Mr. DeLuca has more than 30 years of retailing experience and has spent the past 19 years with Toys “R” Us in senior management positions. During this period, he has made more than 60 buying and sourcing trips to Hong Kong and China. Mr. DeLuca is also responsible for the company’s benchmark toy safety compliance programs, which he developed and implemented in 1989. In 1995, the company was honored by the chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission for its significant accomplishments in toy safety. Mr. DeLuca’s responsibilities include the company’s comprehensive Code of Conduct for Suppliers program, which he authored and implemented in 1997. In that same year, Toys “R” Us was honored with the Pioneer Award in Global Ethics as a corporate conscience award-winner by the Council on Economic Priorities. Mr. DeLuca is chairman of the company’s corporate Toy Safety and Code of Conduct Committees. He is chairman of the Advisory Board of Social Accountability International (SAI) and a member of SAI’s Governing Board of Directors. He has been a frequent guest speaker and panelist at numerous conferences, including the joint U.S. and European Symposium on Codes of Conduct and International Standards in Brussels, the Rutgers University School of Law Conference on Corporate Multinationalism and Human Rights, and the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs. Mike Grace is associate administrative assistant to President Morton Bahr of the Communications Workers of America (CWA). He has been associated with CWA for more than 20 years. Mr. Grace has extensive experience in international labor relations and has participated in numerous international labor delegations to Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. He

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also serves as the CWA staff liaison to the AFL-CIO International Affairs Committee, which is chaired by President Bahr. Pharis J. Harvey (retired), a founder of the International Labor Rights Fund (ILRF), serves as senior consultant to ILRF. Mr. Harvey served as ILRF’s executive director from 1990 to 2001. Before joining the fund, Mr. Harvey spent 12 years with the North American Coalition for Human Rights in Korea, which is based in Washington, DC. This followed many years of work in Asia, under the sponsorship of the United Methodist Church and various ecumenical bodies, to support the efforts of workers and community organizations to defend their human rights. His most recent post in Asia (1975–1979) was as consultant on economic justice to the Christian Conference of Asia. Mr. Harvey is the author of Trading Away the Future: Child Labor in India’s Export Industries (1994) and editor of several studies of labor and people’s movements in Asia, including People Toiling Under Pharaoh: MNCs in Asia (1976) and No Room in the Inn: Asia’s Minorities (1978). He has published many articles in U.S., Japanese, and Korean journals. In October 1996, Mr. Harvey received the prestigious Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award for Lifetime Achievement in developing labor rights law and defending labor rights internationally. Tom Hayden has played an active role in American politics and history for more than three decades, beginning with the student, civil rights, and antiwar movements of the 1960s. Mr. Hayden was elected to the California State Legislature in 1982 and served for 10 years in the Assembly before being elected to the State Senate in 1992, where he served 8 years. Recently, Mr. Hayden has been involved with the Campaign for the Abolition of Sweatshops and Child Labor. He serves as the director of the West Coast Regional Office. Mr. Hayden is the author of more than 175 measures that address issues such as reform of money in politics, worker safety, school decentralization, small business tax relief, domestic violence, gang violence in the inner city, student fee increases at universities, protection of endangered species like salmon, and overhauling the “three strikes, you’re out” laws. He also authored a measure that was signed into law to assist Holocaust survivors in receiving recognition and compensation for their exploitation as slave labor during the Nazi era. Mr. Hayden is the author of 11 books, including his autobiography Reunion.

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Neil Kearney has been general secretary of the International Textile, Garment and Leather Workers’ Federation (ITGLWF) for the past 14 years. Born in Ireland, Mr. Kearney began work in the banking sector in the United Kingdom before becoming a full-time trade unionist. He has served on various U.K. Government Economic and Industrial Committees and was active in U.K. politics where he held elective office for more than a decade. Mr. Kearney travels extensively in his trade union role and has visited some 150 different countries since his election as general secretary of the ITGLWF. He is a member of the Advisory Board of Social Accountability International, which manages SA8000, and the United Kingdom’s Ethical Trading Initiative. He received the “Il Natale, La Notta della Vita” international award for his work on the elimination of child labor worldwide in 1998 and the 1999 Work and Environment Award of the Associazione Ambiente e Lavoro for his efforts to improve working conditions, especially in developing countries. Aewha Kim was born in Seoul, Korea, and holds a diploma from Sookmyeong University in Korea. She has worked as an organizer and trainer for workers in Korea and as a general secretary at the Labor Human Rights Center in Korea. She is now in charge of the Asian Transnational Corporation Project at the Asia Monitor Resource Center. Marcela Manubens is vice-president of Human Rights Programs for Phillips-Van Heusen Corporation (PVH). At PVH she has created and directed the company’s human rights and working conditions programs worldwide. Since 1996, Ms. Manubens has participated in the Apparel Industry Partnership—now the Fair Labor Association (FLA), a tripartite initiative to eliminate sweatshops. She is a member of the Audit Committee of the FLA Board and of the Monitoring Subcommittee. She is also a member of the Women’s Foreign Policy Group. A professor at Columbia University, Ms. Manubens teaches Human Rights and Multinational Corporations in a Global Economy. She has been a lecturer and guest speaker at national and international conferences and has conducted human rights and compliance awareness sessions in various countries. Ms. Manubens has extensive working experience in multinationals in the areas of operations, finance, auditing, and ethics. Ms. Manubens holds an M.B.A. from the University of Bridgeport where she was a Fulbright and Halsey International Scholarship recipient,

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and a master’s equivalent in economics and finance from Universidad de Belgrano, Argentina. Roger P. McDivitt has a B.A. in economics from the University of California, Davis. After serving in the Marine Corps, he started working with Yvon Chouinard in 1972 at Chouinard equipment, the predecessor to Patagonia, Inc. He has been the director of sourcing for Patagonia for the past 17 years. He is responsible for all production source development, sourcing strategies, and manufacturing. Mr. McDivitt has developed sourcing for Patagonia in Asia, Europe, and Central and South America as well as in the United States. In this position he leads the team effort to set and achieve corporate objectives in manufacturing in the areas of product quality, product delivery, product cost, workplace codes of conduct, and environmental improvements to manufacturing processes. Mr. McDivitt has worked with the Fair Labor Association from its inception in 1997. Gregg Nebel has been head of Social and Environmental Affairs, Region Americas, of adidas-Salomon AG since January 1998. He also represents adidas-Salomon on the Fair Labor Association’s Board of Directors. Before that, Mr. Nebel spent five years as adidas America’s head of apparel sourcing for the Americas Region. Mr. Nebel has spent 24 years in the apparel industry and has worked in a variety of sourcing and operations management functions and with apparel and footwear supply chains in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Debbie O’Brien is director of the Business and Human Rights Program at Business for Social Responsibility (BSR). She has worked in the Human Rights Program at BSR since 1998. Her primary focus has been on helping companies develop strategies and practices to implement fair working conditions in their global supply chain. She has conducted a number of workshops for suppliers and brand representatives on compliance and codes of conduct in Asia and Latin America and has conducted intensive research on the living wage and metrics for measuring workers’ basic needs. She has completed a comprehensive study on working conditions for the licensed apparel for five major universities. Before joining BSR, Ms. O’Brien worked at Levi Strauss & Company in the government affairs department, focusing on labor rights for its global supply chain. She also served as the deputy director for the National Pollu

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tion Prevention Roundtable, and worked for Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Tom Foley for three years. Ms. O’Brien earned a master’s degree in Public Policy from the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and a B.A. from Whitworth College in Spokane, Washington. Carol Pier is the labor rights and trade researcher for Human Rights Watch’s (HRW) Business and Human Rights Program. She graduated from Harvard Law School in 1998. While in law school, she spent a summer working with the Bureau of International Labor Affairs at the U.S. Department of Labor, where she analyzed Chilean labor law and practice in preparation for the possible accession of Chile to NAFTA. In 1998, she published an article based on that research “Labor Rights in Chile and North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Labor Standards: Questions of Compatibility on the Eve of Free Trade.” In fall 1999, she joined HRW as a fellow and researched and authored the report Hidden in the Home: Abuse of Domestic Workers with Special Visas in the United States. As a fellow, she also provided research and writing assistance for an HRW report documenting violations of workers’ right to freedom of association in the United States. From 2000 through 2001, she worked as a labor rights researcher for the Americas Division of HRW, where she investigated child labor and obstacles to freedom of association on Ecuador’s banana plantations. In April 2002, she released the HRW report based on those findings, Tainted Harvest: Child Labor and Obstacles to Organizing on Ecuador’s Banana Plantations. Katie Quan is associate chair of the Center for Labor Research and Education, Institute of Industrial Relations, University of California at Berkeley. She also directs the activities of the John F. Henning Center for International Labor Relations. Before working at the Labor Center, Ms. Quan was with the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees. From 1975–1998, she was a rank-and-file seamstress, membership trainer, union organizer, and district council manager. She was also an international vice-president, the first Asian Pacific Islander in her union to hold such a position. Ms. Quan is currently a member of the Boards of Directors of the Workers Rights Consortium, the International Labor Rights Fund, the AFL-CIO Union Community Fund, the Labor Project for Working Families, and Sweatshop Watch. She is also on the Board of Directors of the

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Chinatown Economic Development Group and the California Labor Commissioner’s Garment Advisory Committee. Ms. Quan is a graduate of the University of California at Berkeley and has studied at Cornell University’s Institute of Labor Relations and at Columbia University as a Charles H. Revson Fellow. Mila Rosenthal is the director of the Workers Rights Program at the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights (LCHR). She joined LCHR after working at Amnesty International’s UK Business Group, where she lobbied companies to adopt and enforce human rights policies and social accounting. A specialist in industrial development and labor rights in Southeast Asia, she conducted Ph.D. research in garment and textile factories and factory housing communities in Vietnam, and taught anthropology at the London School of Economics. She has been a consultant to Oxfam GB and the UN Industrial Development Organization; she served as director of the NGO Resource project in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Recent publications include “Facing a New Revolution in Vietnam: State Textile Workers in the Post-Reform Economy” in Women & Work in Globalizing Asia (Dong-Sook Shin Gills and Nicola Piper, editors, Routledge, 2002), “Everyone Was Equal: Nostalgia and Anxiety Among Women Workers in a Vietnamese Textile Factory” in Modernisation and Social Change: Transformation in Vietnam (Katja Hemmerich, editor, Munich Institute for Social Science, 2002). Reverend David Schilling is director of the Global Corporate Accountability Program for the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility (ICCR), a coalition of 275 Catholic, Jewish, and Protestant organizations. A United Methodist minister, Rev. Schilling works on labor rights and human rights issues in the global economy. He has had extensive experience in Mexico, Central America, and Asia. In Mexico, El Salvador, Honduras, Indonesia, Vietnam, and China, he has led delegations to visit factories and meet with workers, unions, and NGOs. He helped write the “Principles for Global Corporate Responsibility: Benchmarks for Measuring Business Performance” (1998), a comprehensive set of business principles proposed by ICCR and its religious partners in Canada and Great Britain. Rev. Schilling has published a number of articles in magazines and journals on workers’ rights, sustainable community development, corporate codes of conduct, and shareholder activism. Rev. Schilling is a member of the Coalition for Justice in the

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Maquiladoras and was a founding member of the Independent Monitoring Working Group (which supports independent monitors at Gap suppliers in El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala). He was a member of President Clinton’s Anti-Sweatshop Task Force. Roland Schneider is currently senior policy advisor at the Trade Union Advisory Committee (TUAC) to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in Paris. TUAC is the interface for labor unions with the OECD. It is an international trade union organization with members in all OECD countries. TUAC has consultative status with the OECD and its various committees. Following an apprenticeship as a toolmaker, Mr. Schneider completed studies in mechanical engineering and political science. From 1981 to December 1985, he conducted research projects at the Economic and Social Research Institute of the German federation of trade unions (DGB), located in Düsseldorf. In 1986 he joined the DGB as head of the Department of New Technology and Humanization of Work. At TUAC, which he joined in 1998, he works on employment, labor market, and social policy issues, as well as on education and training issues. Barbara Shailor, director of the International Affairs Department of the AFL-CIO, is internationally recognized for her lifelong work to secure economic, social, and political rights for workers in the United States and throughout the world. In 1996, Ms. Shailor was appointed by AFL-CIO President John Sweeney to reorganize and direct the organization’s international work. She oversees the work of the American Center for International Labor Solidarity, which works through 26 field offices to support unions in 55 countries in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. She serves as a senior adviser to AFL-CIO President Sweeney on foreign and international policy issues. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on the Board of Directors of the German Marshall Fund, the Global Reporting Initiative, Solidar, the Asian Advisory Committee of HRW, as well as numerous U.S. government committees. Dennis A. Smith is the president of the Commission for the Verification of Corporate Codes of Conduct (COVERCO). For the past five years, COVERCO has monitored compliance with internationally accepted core labor standards in the Maquila, agricultural export, and construction in

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dustries in Guatemala. Mr. Smith, a writer and educator, is a mission coworker of the Presbyterian Church (USA). He has lived and worked in Guatemala since 1977. Anna Walker has been with the United States Council for International Business (USCIB) since September 1999. She is responsible for the Council’s activities in the areas of international labor affairs, corporate responsibility, and health care policy. As part of her responsibilities at the USCIB, Ms. Walker serves as the representative of U.S. business to the ILO as adviser to USCIB President Thomas M.T. Niles. Ms. Walker also manages USCIB efforts related to corporate responsibility, including dissemination of best practices, revision of the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, and implementation of the UN Global Compact with business. Ms. Walker holds B.A. degrees in International Relations and Spanish from the University of California, Davis, and a master’s degree in International Affairs and International Economics from the Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies. May Wong was born in Hong Kong and holds a Diploma in Sociology from Hong Kong’s Shue Yan College. She studied at the University of York in Great Britain, and earned her master’s degree in Women and Development in 1996. She has been a researcher on multinational corporations in China at the City University of Hong Kong and is currently China program officer at the Asia Monitor Resource Center, Hong Kong. Robert Zane is the senior vice president, Manufacturing, Sourcing, Distribution and Logistics for Liz Claiborne, Incorporated, a multibrand apparel corporation with an annual sales volume of $3.6 billion. He joined Liz Claiborne in 1995. Mr. Zane has spent 40 years in the apparel industry in various operational, consulting, and international roles. He is a member of the Fair Labor Association Board of Directors, an organization that is pioneering the independent monitoring of factories throughout the world. Mr. Zane has degrees from Brooklyn College and the Fashion Institute of Technology.