Appendix A
Workshop Speaker Biosketches

Raquel Artecona is regional advisor on international trade at the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean. Her work involves providing technical support to regional trade agreements, including the FTAA, and monitoring economic relations between the United States and Latin America through trade, capital flows, and foreign direct investment. Prior to joining the UN in 2001, she was affiliated with the World Bank, where she was involved in research and operational support on labor market, gender, and trade issues. Raquel Artecona did her undergraduate studies at the Universidad de la República (Uruguay) and got her Master’s degree from the University of Kansas. She is now a Ph.D. candidate in economics at American University.

Bama Athreya is the deputy director for the ILRF, a Washington DC-based nonprofit advocacy organization. Dr. Athreya joined the ILRF in early 1998, just after returning from a two-year assignment in Cambodia as the AFL-CIO’s country representative. While in Cambodia she directed worker education and labor law training programs and conducted extensive research on the problems of women workers and on child labor. A cultural anthropologist, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. She spent three years in Indonesia, first as a State Department official and later as an independent researcher, and wrote her thesis on Indonesia’s labor movement. She has also lived and worked in China, Taiwan, and India.



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Appendix A Workshop Speaker Biosketches Raquel Artecona is regional advisor on international trade at the UN Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean. Her work involves providing technical support to regional trade agreements, including the FTAA, and monitoring economic relations between the United States and Latin America through trade, capital flows, and foreign direct investment. Prior to joining the UN in 2001, she was affiliated with the World Bank, where she was involved in research and operational support on labor market, gender, and trade issues. Raquel Artecona did her undergraduate studies at the Universidad de la República (Uruguay) and got her Master’s degree from the University of Kansas. She is now a Ph.D. candidate in economics at American University. Bama Athreya is the deputy director for the ILRF, a Washington DC-based nonprofit advocacy organization. Dr. Athreya joined the ILRF in early 1998, just after returning from a two-year assignment in Cambodia as the AFL-CIO’s country representative. While in Cambodia she directed worker education and labor law training programs and conducted extensive research on the problems of women workers and on child labor. A cultural anthropologist, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. She spent three years in Indonesia, first as a State Department official and later as an independent researcher, and wrote her thesis on Indonesia’s labor movement. She has also lived and worked in China, Taiwan, and India.

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Kevin Bales is director of Free the Slaves, the U.S. sister organization of Anti-Slavery International (the world’s oldest human rights organization), and Professor of Sociology at the University of Surrey Roehampton in London. His book Disposable People: New Slavery in the Global Economy, published in 1999, was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and has been published in nine other languages. Archbishop Desmond Tutu called it “a well researched, scholarly and deeply disturbing exposé of modern slavery.” Bales’s work won the Premio Viareggio for services to humanity in 2000, and the documentary based on his work won the Peabody Award for 2000. He is a trustee of Anti-Slavery International and a consultant to the United Nations Global Program on Trafficking of Human Beings. Bales has been invited to advise the U.S., British, Irish, Norwegian, and Nepali governments, as well as the governments of the Economic Community of West African States, on the formulation of policy on slavery and human trafficking. He gained his Ph.D. at the London School of Economics. He is currently editing an Anti-Human Trafficking Toolkit for the UN, working with the chocolate industry to remove child and slave labor from the product chain, and writing on contemporary slavery (see, for example, his feature article in the April 2002 Scientific American). Lance A. Compa (author of workshop paper) has been a senior lecturer at the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University since 1997. He teaches courses and conducts research on international and U.S. labor law. One large research project led to the publication of his most recent book, Unfair Advantage: Workers’ Freedom of Asso ciation in the United States under International Human Rights Standards (Human Rights Watch, August 2000). He has investigated the impacts of international trade and investment on workers and trade unions, and researched and developed policy positions linking labor rights with trade policies. From 1995 to 1997, he was the first director of Labor Law & Economic Research at NAFTA Labor Secretariat. In this position, he directed a staff of lawyers and economists from the United States, Canada, and Mexico in comparative studies of labor law and labor markets. Earlier, he held legal and managerial positions with two trade unions. He received his J.D. from Yale Law School and is a member of the Massachusetts bar. He has published many articles in academic journals as well as books, monographs, book reviews, and opinion pieces. Anthony Giles is the director of research of the Secretariat of the CLC. The

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Commission is an international body established under the NAALC, a supplementary accord to NAFTA. The CLC Secretariat, located in Washington, DC, is the administrative and research arm of the Commission. As director of research, Dr. Giles is responsible for coordinating the Commission’s research into North American employment law, labor markets, labor relations, and human resources management. Dr. Giles is currently on leave from Université Laval in Quebec City, Canada, where he is a full professor in the Department of Industrial Relations. He holds a Bachelor of Administration degree from Concordia University in Montréal, a Master’s degree in Public Administration from Carleton University in Ottawa, and a Ph.D. in Industrial Relations from the University of Warwick in England. Before joining Université Laval in 1992, he was a professor in the Faculty of Administration at the University of New Brunswick. A specialist in comparative and international industrial relations, Dr. Giles’s recent academic research and publications have focused on globalization and its impact on work and employment, as well as on the management of work in transnational firms. He is a past Secretary-Treasurer of the Executive Board of the Canadian Industrial Relations Association. He is presently a member of the Industrial Relations Research Association’s NAFTA Committee and the Groupe de recherche sur la transformation de la régulation du travail face à la mondialisation, an interuniversity research group in Quebec. He is associate editor of the journal Relations industrielles/Industrial Relations and a member of the editorial board of the journal Labor/Le travail. Ann Jordan is director of the IATP at the International Human Rights Law Group. She directs and implements a project to bring a human rights perspective to legal and social responses to the international problem of human trafficking. IATP works with immigrant rights, women’s rights, and other nongovernmental organizations in the United States, Nigeria, Bosnia, Cambodia, Russia, the Ukraine, and elsewhere on legal reform, research, training, and advocacy. Ms. Jordan was deeply involved in the development of the new U.S. trafficking law; she organized the Freedom Network (USA) to Empower Trafficked and Enslaved Persons and formed the Human Rights Caucus of anti-trafficking and human rights organizations from all regions of the world to advocate for a human rights framework in the new UN Trafficking Protocol. She was also a member of the Women’s Caucus for Gender Justice in the International Criminal Court, which participated in the negotiations for the new UN International Crimi

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nal Court and advocated for the inclusion of gender-based crimes and gender balance in the treaty. She was a Fulbright Scholar in the law faculties of Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin Province, China, and the City University of Hong Kong, as well as a law professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Ms. Jordan earned her law and undergraduate degrees at Columbia University. Dwight W. Justice is currently on the staff of the ICFTU in Brussels where his main responsibilities are in the areas of multinational companies, industrial relations, and trade union organizing. He has been extensively involved in the area of corporate responsibility and codes of conduct. He is a member of the board of the Ethical Trading Initiative. He has served as the adviser to the Workers’ Group on committees of the International Labor Conference. Mr. Justice began his work for trade unions as a shop steward for the United Food and Commercial Workers Union. Since 1977 he has held a number of positions with various trade union organizations in the areas of political and legislative affairs, organizing, and international affairs. He has organized workers in the education, health care, public service, manufacturing, and retail sectors. He has been on the staff of the ICFTU since 1990. He was born in Williamson, West Virginia, in 1951 and is a graduate of Elmira College. Dusty Kidd manages the Compliance Department, a global team of managers and inspectors stationed throughout the world to provide labor and environmental oversight for the Nike supply chain over more than 800 factories in more than 50 countries. Kidd joined Nike in 1991 as a marketing communications director in Oregon and Hong Kong. In 1995 he was named director of Independent Businesses for Asia Pacific, overseeing Nike marketing and distribution through licensees in Asia. In 1996 he was named director of Labor Practices, and he established and directed the efforts of that department, first in Asia and then, in 1997, from Nike’s headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon. He was named to his current position in 2000. Kidd has a B.A. in International Relations from the University of Wisconsin and an M.A. in Journalism from the University of Missouri. He was a business journalist for 15 years, during which time he was a congressional and foreign correspondent in Washington, DC, Hong Kong, and Tokyo, and an editor and publisher in New York.

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Sandra Polaski recently joined the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace as a senior associate. Her work will focus on international labor policy in the context of trade and development. Until April 2002, Ms. Polaski served as the U.S. Secretary of State’s Special Representative for International Labor Affairs, the senior State Department official dealing with such matters. In that capacity she played a leading role in the development of U.S. government policy and strategies on international labor issues, and she integrated those issues into U.S. foreign policy. Among other responsibilities at the State Department, she served as the lead negotiator in establishing labor provisions in the U.S.–Jordan Free Trade Agreement. Ms. Polaski also represented the U.S. government on labor policy issues at UN and ILO meetings. She conducted dialogues on labor matters with numerous developing and transitional country governments on behalf of the United States. Ms. Polaski was responsible for the development and implementation of the State Department’s innovative Partnerships to Eliminate Sweatshops program, which provides grants to private-sector groups to pursue projects that promote corporate social responsibility and good labor standards in workplaces around the globe. Previously, Ms. Polaski was the director of Economic and Labor Law Research for the Secretariat of the North American Commission on Labor Cooperation, a NAFTA-related intergovernmental body. Prior to her work in the international labor field, Ms. Polaski was a leader in U.S. unions, with responsibilities as a strategist, chief negotiator, and organizer. Ms. Polaski holds a Master’s degree in international economics and international relations from the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. She also holds degrees from the University of Wisconsin and the University of Dayton. Harry Anthony Patrinos is senior education economist at the World Bank. His main areas of focus are demand-side financing and lifelong learning issues in the Latin America region. Last year he led the Task Force on Bridging the Digital Divide Through Education. He established the Economics of Education Thematic Group (<http://www.worldbank.org/education/economicsed>), as well as EdInvest ( <www.worldbank.org/edinvest>), the Education Investment Information Facility. Dr. Patrinos has many publications in the academic and policy literature. He is co-author of the book Decentralization of Education: Demand-Side Financing (1997). He has worked in Africa, Latin America, Asia, Europe, and North America. His latest book, co-edited with Christiaan Grootaert, is Policy Analysis of Child Labor: A Comparative Study (St. Martin’s Press, 1999). He is one of

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the main authors of the World Bank’s sector review paper on education, Priorities and Strategies for Education (1995). He previously worked as an economist at the Economic Council of Canada. Mr. Patrinos received a doctorate from the University of Sussex (England). Martín Rama is lead economist with the Development Research Group of the World Bank. In recent years, his work has focused mainly on labor market issues. He has managed large research projects on labor policies and institutions, income support programs for the unemployed, and public sector downsizing. In the context of the latter project, he is involved in World Bank-supported programs to reform the public sector in various developing countries and transition economies. Martín Rama did his undergraduate studies at the Universidad de la República (Uruguay) and received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Paris. His academic publications include journal articles on labor economics, trade policy, macroeconomic stabilization, long-run growth, and political economy issues. Prior to joining the World Bank in 1992, he was affiliated with the Centro de Investigaciones Económicas, a nonpartisan think tank in Uruguay. For the last 12 years he has been a visiting professor at the University of Paris, where he teaches development economics for graduate students. Amy R. Ritualo is a data analyst in the International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour at the International Labour Office in Geneva. In this capacity, Ms. Ritualo carries out indepth analyses of child labor data in order to develop indicators of child labor, identify general and regional patterns of child labor, evaluate child labor data collection methodologies, and provide assistance in establishing priorities and recommendations for policy and program development. In addition, her interests are in increasing public awareness of children’s well-being in the United States and the effects of divorce and remarriage on children’s well-being. She holds a Master’s degree in Demography from Georgetown University and a B.S. from Western Washington University. David Roe is counsel for the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights and director of its new Workers Rights Information Project. From 1976 through 2001 he was on the staff of Environmental Defense (formerly the EDF), except for a sabbatical year teaching at Harvard Law School. At EDF he specialized in information disclosure issues, wrote California’s landmark toxic chemical disclosure law (Proposition 65), and led strategy for

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the Scorecard website (www.scorecard.org). Mr. Roe got his B.A. from Yale, studied at Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, came back to Yale for a J.D., and is a member of the California bar. He wrote Dynamos and Virgins (Random House, 1984) and has also published a number of articles and studies, including most recently “Ready or Not: The Coming Wave of Toxic Chemicals,” Ecology Law Quarterly (forthcoming); “Toxic Chemical Control Policy: Three Unabsorbed Facts,” Environmental Law Reporter (February 2002); and “Green Scholarship,” The Green Bag (Autumn 1999). Alice Tepper Marlin serves as president of SAI. SAI is a charitable human rights organization dedicated to improving workplaces and communities by developing and implementing socially responsible standards. She has held this CEO position since 1996, when SAI was founded. She is also adjunct professor of Markets, Ethics and Law at New York University’s Stern School of Business. Ms. Tepper Marlin is the recipient of numerous awards, including Japan Society Fellowship, Right Livelihood Award, Wellesley College Alumnae Achievement Award, Social Venture Pioneer Award, and both Adweek’s and Mademoiselle’s Woman of the Year Award. She has been profiled in the New York Times, People, Time, and numerous other publications around the world. She has been interviewed by the Today Show, CNN, Good Morning America, and others. She teaches MBA candidates at the Stern School of Business. In 1969, Ms. Tepper Marlin founded the CEP and served for 33 years as president. At CEP she wrote and/or edited dozens of books, including Shopping for a Better World (Ballantine Books). Earlier, Ms. Tepper Marlin served as a securities analyst and labor economist at Burnham & Co. and as the editor of the tax journal of the International Bureau of Fiscal Documentation in the Netherlands. Constance Ann Thomas is section chief, Equality and Employment Branch in the Department of International Labour Standards of the International Labour Office, Geneva, Switzerland. She was admitted to the California bar in 1981 and has been engaged full-time with the ILO since 1990. Her current responsibilities include secretariat coordination on application of fundamental labor rights with ILO supervisory bodies, promotion of ILO international and technical assistance on labor standards concerning equality, research on equality issues, advisory technical assistance on national labor law drafting and reform, and liaison work with UN human rights treaty bodies. Previous assignments include posting as senior specialist on International Labor Standards, Labor Law and Gender Issues in the

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Multi-disciplinary Team of the Caribbean. Earlier, she was employed as an associate attorney in private practice employment and labor law firms (Law Office of Moore and Bell, Oakland, California, 1980–1988; Law Office of Mcternan, Stender and Walsh, San Francisco, California, 1988–1990).