APPENDIXES



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APPENDIXES

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A Members of the Committee RICHARD R. MUNTZ, Chair, is a professor and past chair of the computer science department, School of Engineering and Applied Science, University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). His current research interests are sensor-rich environments, multimedia storage servers and database systems, distributed and parallel database systems, spatial and scientific database systems, data mining, and computer performance evaluation. He is the author of more than 150 research papers. Dr. Muntz received a B.E.E. from the Pratt Institute in 1963, an M.E.E. from New York University in 1966, and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Princeton University in 1969. He is a member of the board of directors for SIGMETRICS and past chair of the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP) working group 7.3 on computer performance modeling and analysis. He has been a member of the Corporate Technology Advisory Board at NCR/ Teradata, a member of the Science Advisory Board of NASA’s Center of Excellence in Space Data Information Systems, and a member of the Goddard Space Flight Center Visiting Committee on Information Technology. He was an associate editor for the Journal of the ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) from 1975 to 1980 and the editor in chief of ACM Computing Surveys from 1992 to 1995. He is a fellow of ACM and of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). TOM BARCLAY is a researcher in Microsoft’s Bay Area Research Group. He is responsible for the development of the TerraServer project, which is pioneering the use of large-scale databases as a store for spatial data. Mr. Barclay joined Microsoft in 1994 as a program manager of the Visual

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SourceSafe product team in the Developer Division. In 1996, he joined the Scalable Servers Group of the Bay Area Research Center led by James Gray. Prior to joining Microsoft, Mr. Barclay worked for Digital Equipment Corporation for 18 years. He received a B.S. in commerce from Rider University. JEFF DOZIER, professor of environmental science and management at the University of California at Santa Barbara, has research and teaching interests in the fields of snow hydrology, earth system science, remote sensing, and information systems. In particular, Dr. Dozier has pioneered interdisciplinary studies in two areas: one involves the hydrology, hydro-chemistry, and remote sensing of mountainous drainage basins; the other is in the integration of environmental science and computer science and technology. In these fields, he has authored or coauthored 18 books and monographs, about 100 articles in leading journals, and an equal number of conference papers and reports. In addition, he has played a role in development of the educational and scientific infrastructure. Dr. Dozier founded the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and served as its first dean for 6 years. He was the senior project scientist for NASA’s Earth Observing System in its formative stages, when the configuration for the system was established. He helped found the MEDEA group, which investigates the use of classified data for environmental research, monitoring, and assessment. Dr. Dozier received his B.A. from California State University, Hayward, in 1968 and his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1973. He has been a faculty member at the University of California, Santa Barbara, since 1974. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), an honorary professor of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a recipient of the NASA Public Service Medal, and the 1997 Schneebaum Lecturer at Goddard Space Flight Center. He served on the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) for 6 years, is currently a member of the Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data, and was a member (and in one case the chair) of the committees that surveyed the hydrologic and computational sciences and the problems of data archiving: Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences (1991), Computing the Future: A Broader Agenda for Computer Science and Engineering (1992), and Preserving Scientific Data on Our Physical Universe: A New Strategy for Archiving the Nation’s Scientific Information Resources (1995) (he was the chair of the committee for this report). CHRISTOS FALOUTSOS is a professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. He has spent sabbaticals at IBM-Almaden and AT&T

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Bell Labs and worked as a consultant to AT&T Research, Lucent, and Sun Microsystems. Dr. Faloutsos received the Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation (1989), three “best paper” awards (SIGMOD 94, VLDB 97, KDD01 runner-up), and four teaching awards. Dr. Faloutsos is a member of the IEEE and the ACM. He is a member of the executive committee of SIGKDD; he has published more than 100 refereed articles and one monograph and holds four patents. His research interests include data mining, fractals, indexing methods for multimedia and text databases, and database performance. He received a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto and a B.Sc. from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece. ALAN M. MACEACHREN is a professor of geography and director of the GeoVISTA Center at the Pennsylvania State University. He has played a leading role, nationally and internationally, in defining a research agenda for human-centered geospatial visualization and in building cross-disciplinary links to related efforts in scientific and information visualization and in statistics. As chair for the International Cartographic Association (ICA) Commission on Visualization (1995-1999), he served as that organization’s liaison to the ACM SIGGRAPH Carto Project. He is now chair of the expanded ICA Commission on Visualization and Virtual Environments. Dr. MacEachren is the author of two books as well as coeditor of one book and four journal special issues focusing on geovisualization/exploratory spatial data analysis (Cartography & GIS, 1992; Computers in Geoscience, 1997; International Journal of Geographical Information Science, 1999; Cartography & GIS, 2001). Dr. MacEachren served as a member of the NRC’s Redis-covering Geography Committee (1993-1997). In 1998, he was awarded the Wilson Research Award by the Pennsylvania State University College of Earth and Mineral Science for contributions toward a cognitive-semiotic theory of geospatial representation and visualization, which is detailed in How Maps Work: Representation Visualization and Design. In addition to this theoretical work, he has conducted numerous cognitive and usability studies of geospatial information representation tools and environments, including several for the National Center for Health Statistics and the National Cancer Institute. In his role as a faculty fellow in the Penn State Center for Academic Computing (1998-2000), Dr. MacEachren took the lead in expanding center expertise and capabilities related to design, use, and assessment of virtual environment technologies and collaborative visualization in both research and instruction. Dr. MacEachren holds a B.A. in geography from Ohio University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in geography from the University of Kansas.

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JOANNE L. MARTIN is currently the director of solution development and deployment at Global Web Solutions, supporting the customer-facing Web sites for IBM.com. In that role, she is responsible for defining and delivering the integrated Web-facing solutions for the consumer, small and medium business, and large-enterprise audience segments, in addition to the IBM B2B gateway. Her previous assignment was as the technical assistant to Bruce Harreld, IBM’s senior vice president for strategy. Dr. Martin also has been the business line manager for scientific and technical computing for the RS6000 Division. In that role, she was responsible for IBM’s high-performance scientific computing systems. She was a member of the management team that developed and delivered the scalable power parallel systems, with specific responsibility for the performance measurement and analysis of the system. Dr. Martin has also been active in the external scientific community. She was the founding editor in chief of MIT Press’s Journal of Supercomputer Applications, and she was on the steering committee that created the successful ACM/IEEE conference series on high-performance computing and communications— chairing the conference in 1990 and chairing the technical program for 1998. She has served as an advisor to the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. She was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Computer Security in the Department of Energy and was also a member of the committee that prepared the report An Agenda for Improved Evaluation of Supercomputer Performance. She is listed in Who’s Who Among America’s Men and Women of Science and was named by Working Mother magazine as one of the 25 most influential working mothers for 1998. Dr. Martin earned a Ph.D. in mathematics from the Johns Hopkins University in 1981. She began her research career at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, where she conducted the first comprehensive analysis of the scientific workload and its relationship to the performance of supercomputers. In 1984, Dr. Martin joined IBM as a research staff member at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center to continue her research into supercomputer performance evaluation and measurement. She was appointed a senior technical staff member in 1993 and was elected to the IBM Academy in 1997. CHERRI M. PANCAKE is a professor of computer science and Intel Faculty Fellow at Oregon State University and serves as director of the North-west Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering. Dr. Pancake received a B.S. from Cornell University in 1971 and pursued her initial career in Latin American cross-cultural studies. As director of the Ixchel Museum in Guatemala, she employed ethnographic survey techniques to study social change in Mayan communities. After completing her Ph.D. in computer engineering at Auburn University in 1986, Dr. Pancake turned to usability engineering, where she studies how software systems

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can better support users’ conceptual models and computing strategies. She conducted much of the seminal work to identify how the needs of other scientists and engineers differ from those of the computer science and business communities. Most recently, she has focused on mechanisms for improving remote access to very large data sets, particularly when data are distributed both physically and across disciplinary boundaries. Dr. Pancake’s studies of users and the methods she devised for applying usability engineering to improve user interfaces have been supported by a wide range of funding by public and private agencies. She has also succeeded in forging a number of collaborations yielding highly usable products and standards, such as the Parallel Tools Consortium, the High Performance Debugging Forum, and standards groups in the area of software support for computational scientists. She serves as advisor on information technology usability to several software and hardware manufacturers, the San Diego Supercomputer Center, the National Biological Information Infrastructure, and the Protein Databank. MAHADEV SATYANARAYANAN (SATYA) is an experimental computer scientist who has pioneered research in the field of mobile information access. One outcome of this work is the Coda File System, which supports disconnected and bandwidth-adaptive operation. Key ideas from Coda have been incorporated by Microsoft into the IntelliMirror component of Windows. Another outcome is Odyssey, a set of opensource operating system extensions for enabling mobile applications to adapt to variation in critical resources such as bandwidth and energy. Coda and Odyssey are building blocks in Project Aura, a research initiative at Carnegie Mellon to build a distraction-free ubiquitous computing environment. Earlier, Dr. Satyanarayanan was a principal architect and implementor of the Andrew File System, which was commercialized by IBM. Dr. Satyanarayanan is the Carnegie Group Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He is currently on partial sabbatical, serving as the founding director of an Intel research lab in Pittsburgh that focuses on software systems for data storage. He received a Ph.D. in computer science from Carnegie Mellon, after bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras. He is the founding editor in chief of IEEE Pervasive Computing. STAFF BIOGRAPHIES CYNTHIA A. PATTERSON is a study director and program officer with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Academies. In addition to this project, she has been working on CSTB projects, including a project on critical infrastructure protection and

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the law and a congressionally mandated study on Internet searching and the domain name system. Ms. Patterson also is working on a joint study with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate on public-private partnerships in the provision of weather and climate services. Prior to joining CSTB, Ms. Patterson completed an M.Sc. from the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her graduate work was supported by the Department of Defense and Science Applications International Corporation. Previously, Ms. Patterson was employed by IBM as an information technology consultant for both federal government and private industry clients. Her work included application development, database administration, network administration, and project management. She received a B.Sc. in computer science from the University of Missouri-Rolla. MARGARET HUYNH, senior project assistant, has been with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board since January 1999. In addition to this project, she has been working on Internet searching and the domain name system and information technology and creativity. Ms. Huynh also assists with the CSTB board meetings as well as on the project “Exploring Information Technology Issues for the Behavioral and Social Sciences” (Digital Divide and Democracy). Previously, she worked on the projects that produced the reports “Building a Workforce for the Information Economy” and “The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age.” Prior to coming to the Academies, Ms. Huynh worked as a meeting assistant at Management for Meetings and as a meeting assistant at the American Society for Civil Engineers. Ms. Huynh has a B.A. (1990) in liberal studies with minors in sociology and psychology from Salisbury State University, Salisbury, Maryland.