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138 taphin Committee Sketches of embers and Scat Joe B. Wyatt (Chair), chancellor and CEO of Vanderbilt Univer- sity from 1982 to 2000, is a computer scientist who has focused on technology-based innovation in business, research, and edu- cation for 45 years. A patentee in computer-aided design sys- tems, he has led the development and implementation of com- puter-based teaching models in a number of fields ranging from law to computer science. While a member of the faculty and vice president at Harvard University, he was a founding director and vice chairman of the Massachusetts Technology Develop- ment Corporation, a public venture capital company for new technology start-ups begun in 1978. Wyatt is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a direc- tor of several companies, a trustee of several philanthropic orga- nizations, and a principal of the Washington Advisory Group. John S. Reed (Vice Chair) retired in April 2000 as chairman and co-chief executive officer of Citigroup. Mr. Reed spent 35 years at Citicorp and played a part in the tremendous transformation that has taken place in the industry, from globalization and the advent of electronic banking, to the creation of Citigroup, a new breed of financial services firm. He also created the Citicorp Behavioral Sciences Research Council. He has served on the boards of the Russell Sage Foundation and the Center for Ad- vanced Studies in the Behavioral and Social Sciences, the Spen- cer Foundation, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. Catherine Snow (Vice Chair) is the Henry Lee Shattuck profes- sor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research involves language and literacy acquisition, second STRATEGIC EDUCATION RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP

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language acquisition, and bilingualism. She has held teaching and research positions at Erasmus University, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Cambridge, Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and Universidad Autonoma in Madrid. She was chair of the National Research Council's Committee on the Pre- vention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children and is cur- rently chairing a National Academy of Education committee producing a report on educating teachers to teach reading. Carole Ames has served as professor of educational psychology and dean of the College of Education at Michigan State Univer- sity since 1993. She has also held administrative and faculty positions at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and at the University of Maryland. Her research has focused on the development of social and academic motivation in children, especially the effects of classroom structures and teaching prac- tices on children's motivation to learn and on school and family relationships. She has published extensively on these topics, is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, and has served on the board of several professional organizations. lames N. Baron is the Walter Kenneth Kilpatrick professor of organizational behavior and human resources at Stanford Uni- versity. His research interests include human resource manage- ment and organizational design, especially in emerging compa- nies; the effects of social networks on employees; and career inequalities by gender and race. He currently serves on the advisory boards of several academic and corporate organiza- tions. Lloyd Bond joined the Carnegie Foundation for the Advance- ment of Teaching as a senior scholar in 2002, after professor- ships at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro (1988- 2002) and the University of Pittsburgh (1976-1988~. As an educational measurement specialist, he has been an associate editor and member of the editorial boards of many of the lead- ing journals in education and psychology. A fellow of the Ameri- can Psychological Association, he has served widely on scien- tific committees of the National Research Council, the American Psychological Association, and the American Educational Re- search Association. He has a Ph.D. in psychometrics from the Johns Hopkins University. A P P E N D I X C '39

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David Cohen is lohn Dewey collegiate professor of education and professor of public policy at the University of Michigan. His research has addressed the relations between policy and instruction, the relations between research and policy, the na- ture of teaching practice, efforts to reform schools and teaching, and large-scale school intervention programs. With Brian Rowan and Deborah L. Ball, he is directing the Study of Instructional Improvement, a large, longitudinal study of efforts to improve performance in high-povert~v elementary schools. Laura Cooper is the assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction at Evanston Township High School, Evanston, Illinois. She has worked as a secondary teacher and administra- tor in urban and suburban districts in Arizona, Massachusetts, and Illinois and directed the Institute for Learning and Teaching at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Her work has fo- cused on changing classrooms and schools by valuing the craft knowledge of teachers and principals and by drawing on the research on teaching and learning. She helped create a national network of 15 school districts committed to eliminating the gap in achievement between white students and students of color, and she currently serves as the convener for the Research Practi- tioner Council of the Minority Student Achievement Network. Suzanne Donovan is associate director of the National Research Council's Strategic Education Research Partnership, and study director of a project that will produce a volume for teachers entitled How Students Learn: History, Math, and Science in the Classroom. She was the study director for the NRC reports Mi- nority Students in Special and Gifted Education, and How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice. She was also a co-editor of Eager to Learn: Educating our Preschoolers. She has a Ph.D. in public policy from the University of California, Berkeley, and was previously on the faculty of Columbia University. James A. Kelly, senior advisor to the SERP project, is an advisor to education organizations, government agencies, and corpora- tions. He was the founding president of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, which was created in 1987 to improve teaching by offering national, voluntary, advanced pro- fessional certification to American teachers and now has certi- fied almost 24,000 teachers as meeting the nation's first rigorous ]40 STRATEGIC EDUCATION RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP

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standards for accomplished teaching. He retired in October 1999. From 1970 to 1981, he served as program officer at the Ford Foundation, directing programs in education finance reform and related fields and between 1966 and 1978 was on the faculty of Columbia University, serving as assistant, associate, and ad- junct professor. His career in education began as a teacher in Ladue, Missouri. Charles Miller is chairman of Meridian Advisors, Ltd., a pri- vate, family investment partnership. Previously, he was founder and chief executive of an international investment management firm. He is chairman of the Board of Regents of the University of Texas System. In 2001, he served as a member of the education advisory committee that was appointed by President Bush to help on education issues during the administrative transition. He has served as chairman to a number of public policy com- mittees in Texas dealing with issues ranging from education policy to business development. Richard R. Nelson is George Blumenthal professor of interna- tional and public affairs at Columbia University. He has also taught at Yale University, Carnegie Mellon University, and Oberlin College. He has been a senior staff member of the Presi- dents Council of Economic Advisers and a researcher at the Rand Corporation. His central research interests have been on long-run economic change, with a particular focus on how tech- nology advances over time and the nature and function of eco- nomic institutions. These interests led him some years ago to develop, along with Sidney Winter, An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change. He has written extensively on technological advance, as well as topics in science and technology policy, and is currently interested in the evolution of human know-how, particularly in the fields of medicine and education. Rebecca A. Palacios is a dual language program prekindergarten teacher at Lorenzo de Zavala Special Emphasis School in Cor- pus Christi, Texas. She was formerly the lead teacher for 3-year- olds at Texas A&M University and Corpus Christi Independent School District's Early Childhood Development Center. She is a founding director of the National Board for Professional Teach- ing Standards and received national board certification in 1997. Her doctoral dissertation was on the developmental appropri- A P P E N D I X C ]4]

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ateness of state-adopted prekindergarten curriculum materials in Texas for prekindergarten children. Thomas W. Payzant has served as school superintendent in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania; Eugene, Oregon; Oklahoma City; San Diego; and currently the city of Boston. In 1993, he was appointed by President Clinton to serve as assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education in the U. S. Depart- ment of Education. He worked closely with the Clinton admin- istration to enact passage of the Goals 2000: Educate America Act and to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Educa- tion Act. He has written more than 30 journal articles and book reviews. In 199S, he was named one of four national finalists for Superintendent of the Year by the American Association of School Administrators. Michael Rothschild is the William Stuart Tod professor of eco- nomics and public affairs at Princeton University. He served as dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs and Inter- national Affairs at Princeton University and as founding dean of the Division of Social Science at the University of California, San Diego. An economic theorist, Rothshild has developed tools for studying decision making under uncertainty and the struc- ture of markets with asymmetric information. He has also writ- ten on education, investment, taxation, finance, and jury deci- sion processes. He has held a Guggenheim fellowship and various research grants from the National Science Foundation and has served on the faculties of Princeton University, Harvard University, and the University of Wisconsin. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Economet- ric Society. Ted Sanders is president of the Education Commission of the States. His wide experience in education includes serving as Southern Illinois University president, Ohio superintendent of public instruction, deputy U.S. secretary of education, Illinois state superintendent of education, and Nevada state superin- tendent of education. Besides having authored numerous ar- ticles, book chapters, guest editorials, and professional papers, he holds honorary doctorates from four institutions. '42 STRATEGIC EDUCATION RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP

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Philip Uri Treisman is a professor of mathematics and director of the Charles A. Dana Center for Mathematics and Science Education at the University of Texas. He serves as executive director of the Texas Statewide Systemic Initiative and leads a variety of state efforts focused on strengthening K-16 math- ematics and science education. His research interests lie in edu- cation policy with a focus on the dynamics of education ac- countabilit~v and school finance systems. Alexandra K. Wigdor is director of the National Research Council's Strategic Education Research Partnership. An NRC staff member since 197S, she most recently held the position of deputy director of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education with special responsibility for develop- ing the education program. Among the notable reports on im- proving education produced that grew out of that program are Improving Student Learning: A Strategic Plan for Education Re- search and Its Utilization (1999~; Preventing Reading DifCculties in Young Children (1998~; How People Learn: Mind, Brain, Experience, School (19991; How People Learn: Bridging Research and Practice (1999~; Making Money Matter: Financing America's Schools (1999), and Eager to Learn: Educating Our Preschoolers (2000~. A P P E N D I X C '43

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