APPENDIX B
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Howard B. Bluestein is Professor of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma, where he has served since 1976. His research interests are the observation and physical understanding of weather phenomena on convective, mesoscale, and synoptic scales. Bluestein is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies. He is past chair of the NSF Observing Facilities Advisory Panel, the AMS Committee on Severe Local Storms, and UCAR's Scientific Program Evaluation Committee, and a past member of the AMS Board of Meteorological and Oceanographic Education in Universities. He is also the author of a textbook on synoptic-dynamic meteorology and Tornado Alley, a book for the scientific layperson on severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

James Bruce is the Senior Associate for Global Change Strategies International, Inc. in Ottawa, Canada. In his early professional life, he was a weather forecaster, established the flood warning system for the province of Ontario, and undertook research and teaching in hydrometeorology. Since then, he has held many positions, including being the Acting Deputy Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization, Geneva during which he assisted the Secretary-General in overseeing the establishment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Global Atmosphere Watch for assessment of chemical changes in the Earth's atmosphere. Mr. Bruce has written several books, papers and articles, especially on climate change, environmental management, water resources, and disaster mitigation.

Ian Burton is an independent scholar and consultant. He holds several honorary positions including Scientist Emeritus in Environment Canada; and Emeritus Professor at the University of Toronto. He has recently served as a member of the Independent World Commission on the Oceans and is on the editorial board of three scientific journals including Mitigation and Adaptation to Global Change (Kluwer) and Global Environmental Change (Pergamon) as well as the International Journal of Biometeorology. Recent assignments include technical assistance to the UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme) Country Studies Programme on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation; the GEF (Global Environment Facility) on the costs of adaptation; the World Resources Institute on climate change and economic development in Africa; the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Expert Group on Adaptation; the European Commission in Brussels; and the World Bank on the inclusion of climate impact assessment considerations in Bank investments.

Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr. is the founding director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) at the University of Maryland College Park and Professor in the Department of Meteorology. ESSIC is a joint center among the Departments of Meteorology, Geology, and Geography at the University of Maryland in collaboration with the Earth Sciences Directorate at NASA's Goodard Space Flight Center. Dr. Busalacchi began his professional career as an oceanographer at the NASA/Goodard Space Flight Center. In 1991, he was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in the U.S. Government as the Chief of the NASA/Goodard Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes. In that capacity he furnished scientific direction to a broad, many-faceted program in Earth system science.

David Changnon is an atmospheric scientist specializing in climatological studies in the Department of Geography at Northern Illinois University (NIU). After receiving his PhD in atmospheric sciences in 1991



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From Climate to Weather: Impacts on Society and Economy - Summary of a Forum June 28, 2002 Washington, DC APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION Howard B. Bluestein is Professor of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma, where he has served since 1976. His research interests are the observation and physical understanding of weather phenomena on convective, mesoscale, and synoptic scales. Bluestein is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies. He is past chair of the NSF Observing Facilities Advisory Panel, the AMS Committee on Severe Local Storms, and UCAR's Scientific Program Evaluation Committee, and a past member of the AMS Board of Meteorological and Oceanographic Education in Universities. He is also the author of a textbook on synoptic-dynamic meteorology and Tornado Alley, a book for the scientific layperson on severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. James Bruce is the Senior Associate for Global Change Strategies International, Inc. in Ottawa, Canada. In his early professional life, he was a weather forecaster, established the flood warning system for the province of Ontario, and undertook research and teaching in hydrometeorology. Since then, he has held many positions, including being the Acting Deputy Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization, Geneva during which he assisted the Secretary-General in overseeing the establishment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Global Atmosphere Watch for assessment of chemical changes in the Earth's atmosphere. Mr. Bruce has written several books, papers and articles, especially on climate change, environmental management, water resources, and disaster mitigation. Ian Burton is an independent scholar and consultant. He holds several honorary positions including Scientist Emeritus in Environment Canada; and Emeritus Professor at the University of Toronto. He has recently served as a member of the Independent World Commission on the Oceans and is on the editorial board of three scientific journals including Mitigation and Adaptation to Global Change (Kluwer) and Global Environmental Change (Pergamon) as well as the International Journal of Biometeorology. Recent assignments include technical assistance to the UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme) Country Studies Programme on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation; the GEF (Global Environment Facility) on the costs of adaptation; the World Resources Institute on climate change and economic development in Africa; the IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) Expert Group on Adaptation; the European Commission in Brussels; and the World Bank on the inclusion of climate impact assessment considerations in Bank investments. Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr. is the founding director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC) at the University of Maryland College Park and Professor in the Department of Meteorology. ESSIC is a joint center among the Departments of Meteorology, Geology, and Geography at the University of Maryland in collaboration with the Earth Sciences Directorate at NASA's Goodard Space Flight Center. Dr. Busalacchi began his professional career as an oceanographer at the NASA/Goodard Space Flight Center. In 1991, he was appointed to the Senior Executive Service in the U.S. Government as the Chief of the NASA/Goodard Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes. In that capacity he furnished scientific direction to a broad, many-faceted program in Earth system science. David Changnon is an atmospheric scientist specializing in climatological studies in the Department of Geography at Northern Illinois University (NIU). After receiving his PhD in atmospheric sciences in 1991

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From Climate to Weather: Impacts on Society and Economy - Summary of a Forum June 28, 2002 Washington, DC from Colorado State University, he spent two years at the Southeast Regional Climate Center in Columbia, South Carolina, before taking an academic position at NIU. His major expertise rests in developing climatological information and models for use by weather-sensitive decision makers in agriculture, utilities, insurance, and transportation. He has developed an innovative new “education-to-career” program to train students and simultaneously solve climatological problems facing government and private industry. He has served on various committees of two scientific societies. His research interests also involve the spatial and temporal variability of climate extremes in the U.S. Changnon is the author or co-author on over 30 journal articles, book chapters, and other refereed publications. He has participated in a number of climate change workshops including the July 1998 summer session of the Aspen Global Change Institute titled “Climate extremes: Changes, impacts, and projections.” Recently he was involved in a project examining the use of El Niño-based seasonal forecasts by decision makers during the 1997-98 El Niño. Harold C. Cochrane is Professor in the Department of Economics at Colorado State University where . He has been at Colorado State since 1974 and he teaches environmental and natural resource economics, energy economics, and macroeconomic theory. He has worked extensively in the field of natural and man-made hazards and has served on a number of National Academy of Sciences and National Research Council committees. He is the Director of Colorado State's Hazards Assessment Laboratory. He holds a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Colorado. Robert M. Hirsch is Associate Director for Water with the U.S. Geological Survey. Hirsch began his career with the USGS in 1976 as a hydrologist. He conducted and directed research leading to methods for analysis of: the risk of water-supply shortages, water-quality trends, transport of pollutants in rivers, and flood frequency. He also was instrumental in the design and initiation of USGS programs including the National Water-Quality Assessment Program, Global Change Hydrology Program, and Watershed Modeling Systems Program. He has served as Chief, Branch of Systems Analysis of the Water Resources Division, USGS, Staff Assistant to the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, and Assistant Chief Hydrologist for Research and External Coordination of the USGS. From August 1993 to March 1994, he served as the Acting Director of the USGS. In June 1994, he became Chief Hydrologist of the Water Resources Division. He is a recipient of the Department of the Interior Distinguished Service Award, was conferred the rank of Meritorious Executive by the President of the United States, and was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a recipient of the Water Management Achievement Award from the Interstate Council on Water Policy. He received his BA in Geology from Earlham College, an MS in Geology from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. in Geography and Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University. William H. Hooke is a Senior Policy Fellow and the Director of the Atmospheric Policy Program at the American Meteorological Society in Washington, DC. Prior to arriving at AMS in 2000, he worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and antecedent agencies for 33 years. After six years of research with NOAA he moved into a series of management positions of increasing scope and responsibility including Chief of the Wave Propagation Laboratory Atmospheric Studies Branch, Director of NOAA's Environmental Sciences Group (now the Forecast Systems Lab), Deputy Chief Scientist, and Acting Chief Scientist of NOAA. Between 1993 and 2000, he held two national responsibilities: Director of the U.S. Weather Research Program Office, and Chair of the interagency Subcommittee for Natural Disaster Reduction of the National Science and Technology Council Committee on Environment and Natural Resources. Dr. Hooke was an faculty member at the University of Colorado from 1969 to 1987, and served as a fellow of two NOAA Joint Institutes (CIRES, 1971-1977; CIRA 1987-2000). The author of over fifty refereed publications, and co-author of one book, Dr. Hooke holds a B.S. (Physics Honors) from Swarthmore College (1964), and S.M. (1966) and Ph.D (1967) degrees from the University of Chicago. Anthony Janetos is Senior Fellow at the H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment. Before working with the Heinz Center, Dr. Janetos was Vice President/Chief of Science and Research at World Resources Institute. He was co-chair of the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential

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From Climate to Weather: Impacts on Society and Economy - Summary of a Forum June 28, 2002 Washington, DC Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. His prior jobs include senior scientist at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Dr. Janetos graduated Magna cum Laude from Harvard College with a bachelor’s degree in biology, and earned a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in biology from Princeton University. James E. Jensen is Director of the Office of Congressional and Government Affairs of the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering and Institute of Medicine. From 1987-1995, Mr. Jensen was the Director of Congressional and Public Affairs at the Office of Technology Assessment at the U.S. Congress. In the decade prior to that, he worked on a variety of science and technology issues as a member of the professional staff of the House Committee on Science and Technology and the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs. Mr. Jensen worked on the Clinton-Gore transition team for science and technology and was a Fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research for one year. He holds an A.B. in American Political History from the University of California at Berkeley. Thomas Knutson is a research meteorologist in the Climate Dynamics and Prediction Group at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory - one of the world's leading climate modeling centers. He has been author or co-author of 15 publications in major climate journals, including papers in Science on future hurricane intensities with global warming and (with T. Delworth) on simulation of early 20th century global warming. His recent research interests include: the impact of climate change on hurricane intensities and detection of climate change. He has been an invited expert at several workshops on climate change and extreme events (or tropical cyclones) including at the Aspen Global Change Institute, the Risk Prediction Initiative at the Bermuda Biological Station for Research, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology. He was an invited speaker and breakout session chair for the Tropical Cyclones Session at a recent Workshop on Changes in Extreme Weather and Climate Events organized by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Jay Lawrimore became Chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in May 2000. He was a Meteorologist with the North Carolina Division of Air Quality before joining NCDC in 1998. He was a contributing author to the IPCC Third Assessment - Climate Change 2001 and has been lead author on articles published in journals such as the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Journal of Geophysical Research, Journal of Hydrometeorology, and Chemosphere. As Chief of the Climate Monitoring Branch, Mr. Lawrimore leads a team focused on providing access to high quality climate information while performing analyses to place the current weather and climate in historical perspective. The climate monitoring team also provides links between weather and climate and those sectors of the Nation's economy that are weather sensitive, while also working to develop a network monitoring and performance indicator access system which will provide early detection of time-dependent biases and other network problems. He holds an M.S. in Atmospheric Science from North Carolina State University. Steve Lyons is a tropical weather expert with The Weather Channel. His expertise is in tropical and marine meteorology. He has participated in more than 25 national and international conferences and provided World Meteorological Organization training courses in marine meteorology, tropical meteorology and ocean wave forecasting. Prior to joining The Weather Channel in April 1998, Steve managed the Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch of the Tropical Prediction Center, National Hurricane Center. He has worked directly for private weather companies and traveled around the world forecasting weather in various tropical locales. Dr. Lyons has also been a private consultant forecasting ocean waves for numerous surfing beaches. Among his many interesting jobs, he has been a research scientist for the U.S. Navy, for the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at Princeton University, and for the University of California at Los Angeles. He has also been a professor of meteorology at Texas A&M University and at the University of Hawaii. Dr. Lyons also worked for the National Weather Service South Region Scientific Services Division, where he trained NWS meteorologists. He has published more than 20 papers in scientific journals, and written more than 40

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From Climate to Weather: Impacts on Society and Economy - Summary of a Forum June 28, 2002 Washington, DC technical reports and articles for the National Weather Service and the Navy. He holds a Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Hawaii. Rutherford H. Platt is a Professor of Geography and Planning Law at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and Chair of the Natural Disasters Roundtable. He has served on other NRC committees including the Committee on Flood Insurance Studies, the Committee on Water Resources Research Review, the Committee on a Levee Policy for the National Flood Insurance Program, the Committee on Managing Coastal Erosion, and the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Plan. He also has chaired the NRC Committees on Options to Preserve the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and Flood Control Alternatives in the American River Basin, and he is a current member of the Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Platt recently authored, Disasters and Democracy: The Politics of Extreme Natural Events. Vaughan C. Turekian is a program officer in the National Academy of Science’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and the Program Director for the Committee on Global Change Research. Dr. Turekian has been study director for a number of NAS studies including the recent Climate Change Science report requested by the White House. He received his B.S. degree from Yale University in geology and geophysics and international studies and his Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia. Thomas J. Wilbanks is the corporate research fellow and manager of Developing Country Programs at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. His research interests include the potential of energy technologies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from developing countries and emerging economies; the US national assessment of climate variability and change; energy, environment, and technology planning; and issues of sustainable development. He is a past president of the Association of American Geographers, a recipient of the National Geographic Society's Distinguished Geography Educator's Award, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served on several committees of the National Research Council. He received a BA in social sciences from Trinity University, and a MA and PhD degrees in geography from Syracuse University. Francis Zweirs currently holds the post of Chief of the Canadian Centre for Climate Modeling and Analysis - a division of the Climate Research Branch of the Meteorological Service of Canada - stationed in Victoria, British Columbia. Dr. Zweirs is an editor of the Journal of Climate, and a lead author of the climate change detection and attribution chapter in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report. Dr. Zweirs earned his PhD in statistics from Dalhousie University in 1980.