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Biographical Sketches of Pane} Members and Staff Mark R. Montgomery (Cochair) is professor of economics at the State Uni- versity of New York, Stony Brook, and senior associate at the Population Council. He has also served as senior fellow in the Department of Geography and Plan- ning at the University of Lagos, Nigeria, and as assistant professor at the Office of Population Research, Princeton University. He was a member of the National Research Council's (NRC) Committee on Population and has served on numer- ous other NRC committees. He participated in a Committee on Population study on reproductive health in developing countries and an Institute of Medicine study on unintended pregnancies. His research includes analyses of social networks and diffusion processes in Africa and Asia; research on social learning, mortal- ity, and children's schooling; and research on the link between urban growth and economic growth (for the 1986 National Academy of Sciences report, Population Growth and Economic Development: Policy Questions). He earned a B.A. de- gree from the University of North Carolina and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. Richard Stren (Cochair) is professor of political science at the University of Toronto and former director of the Centre for Urban and Community Studies. Over the past 35 years he has carried out extensive research on African cities, hav- ing done fieldwork in Nairobi, Mombasa, Dar es Salaam, Abidjan, and Makurdi. During the 1 990s he traveled extensively within Latin America. His main research areas are urban politics in the developing world and comparative public adminis- tration. His major publications include Housing the Urban Poor in Africa, African Cities in Crisis, Sustainable Cities, An Urban Problematique, Socially Sustainable Cities, and The Challenge of Urban Government: Policies and Practices. A forth- coming book (written with Patricia McCarney) is entitled Urban Governance in the Developing World: Innovations and Discontinuities (to be published by the Woodrow Wilson Center and the Johns Hopkins University Press). For 8 years he coordinated the Global Urban Research Initiative undertaken at the Univer- sity of Toronto with support from the Ford Foundation. He received his B.A. in 507

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508 CITIES TRANSFORMED economics at the University of Toronto and his M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from the University of California at Berkeley. Charles Becker is research professor of economics and director of the Ameri- can Economic Association's Summer Minority Program at the University of Colorado (Denver), and a research associate with the Population Program in the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado (Boulder). Dr. Becker also serves as a senior advisor to the Kazakhtstan Actuarial Center. For 7 years he served as president of the Economics Institute in Boulder, Colorado. He has published widely on issues in economic development, urbanization, income dis- tribution, and demographic and economic change in the former Soviet Union. Dr. Becker is the author of several books on urban development including Studies in Indian Urban Development (with Edwin Mills, published by Oxford Univer- sity Press in 1986), Indian Urbanization and Economic Growth Since 1960 (with Edwin Mills and Jeffrey Williamson, published by the Johns Hopkins University Press in 1992), and Beyond Urban Bias: African Cities in an Age of Structural Adjustment (with Andrew Hamer and Andrew Morrison, published by Heinemann and James Currey Ltd. in 1994~. He is currently working on demoeconomic mod- eling, forecasting of pension systems, and forecasting of interregional migration in Central Asia. Ellen M. Brennan-Galvin is a visiting fellow at Yale University and a con- sultant for the RAND Corporation. During 2001-2002 she was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. She pre- viously was chief of the Population Policy Section of the United Nations Popula- tion Division. For more than 25 years, Dr. Brennan-Galvin has conducted research on urbanization and urban environmental issues. She is the author of more than a dozen case studies on megacities, published by the United Nations. In addition, she has been in charge of numerous research projects in such areas as reproductive health and rights, abortion law and policies, HIV/AIDS, and international migra- tion policies. For the National Academy of Sciences, she is currently a member of the Committee on Population and served as a member of the Committee on the Geographic Foundation for Agenda 21. She also served as a member of the substantive secretariat at the International Conference on Population and Develop- ment (Cairo, 1994), participating in the drafting of the Programme of Action. Dr. Brennan-Galvin is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Smith College; holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. from Columbia University; and was a Population Council Fellow, studying demography at the Office of Population Research, Princeton University. Martin Brockerhoff was an associate in the Policy Research Division of the Population Council in New York at the time he served on the panel. Previ- ously he served as a population and health program officer at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Dr. Brockerhoff has worked on a broad array of demographic issues, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. His research has focused on urban health and urban poverty and has included fieldwork in Kenya. His re- search has also dealt with the consequences of urban growth, migration, child

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF 509 health in Africa, and the effectiveness of urban family planning programs. His publications include Child Survival in Big Cities: Are the Poor Disadvantaged ? (published by the Population Council, Policy Research Division, in 1993~; Fer- tility and Family Planning in African Cities: The Impact of Female Migration (published by the Population Council, Policy Research Division in 1994~; The Im- pact of Rural-Urban Migration on Child Survival (published in Health Transition Review 4:127-149, 1994~; The Poverty of Cities in the Developing World (written with Ellen Brennan, published by the Population Council, Policy Research Divi- sion in 1996~; Migration, Sexual Behavior and HIV Diffusion in Kenya (written with Ann E. Biddlecom, Population Council, Policy Research Division in 1998), Urban Growth in Developing Countries: A Review of Projections and Predictions (published by the Population Council, Policy Research Division in 1999~; An Ur- banizing World (Population Bulletin 55:3, published in 2000~; and The Urban Demographic Revolution (published in Population Today Aug./Sept. 2000~. He holds a B.A. in political science and an M.A. in economics from Columbia Uni- versity and a Ph.D. in sociology from Brown University. Dr. Brockerhoff resigned from the panel in August 2001. Barney Cohen is study director for the Panel on Urban Population Dynamics and director of the National Academies' Committee on Population. Since 1992 he has worked on a wide variety of projects at the National Academies. His pub- lished volumes include From Death to Birth: Mortality Decline and Reproductive Change (edited with Mark R. Montgomery, published by National Academy Press in 1998), Adolescent Reproductive Behavior in the Developing World (edited with John Bongaarts, published in a special issue of Studies in Family Planning 29~2) in 1998), Changing Numbers, Changing Needs: American Indian Demography and Public Health (edited with Gary D. Sandefur and Ronald R. Rindfuss, pub- lished by National Academy Press in 1996), Preventing and Mitigating AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa: Research and Data Priorities for the Social and Behav- ioral Sciences (edited with J. Trussell, published by National Academy Press in 1996), Population Dynamics in Senegal (edited with Gilles Pison, Kenneth Hill, and Karen Foote, published by National Academy Press in 1995), and Social Dy- namics of Adolescent Fertility in Sub-Saharan Africa (edited with Caroline H. Bledsoe, published by National Academy Press in 1993~. Dr. Cohen holds a Ph.D. in demography from the University of California, Berkeley, an M.A. in economics from the University of Delaware at Newark and a B.A. in pure mathematics and statistics from the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth, Dyfed. Michael Cohen is Director of the Graduate Program in International Affairs at the New School University in New York. He was previously senior advisor in environmentally sustainable development in the Latin America and Caribbean Re- gional Office of the World Bank and on the Faculty of Architecture and Urban Design at the University of Buenos Aires. In September 1999, he joined the International Center for Advanced Studies at New York University for 2 years. Previously Dr. Cohen served as senior advisor and chief of staff in the Office

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510 CITIES TRANSFORMED of the Vice-President for Environmentally Sustainable Development at the World Bank's Washington Office. Prior to that he served as chief of the Urban De- velopment Division at the World Bank. He is the author or co-author of many books and articles on urban development. Recent publications include Preparing for the Urban Future: Global Pressures and Local Forces (written with B. Ru- ble, J. Tulchin, and A. Garland; published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 1996~; The Human Face of the Urban Environment (written with I. Serageldin, published by the World Bank in 1995), Enabling Sustainable Community Devel- opment (written with I. Serageldin and J. Leitman; published by the World Bank in 1995), and Argentina in Collapse? The Americas Debate, (edited with Margarita Gutman, published by The New School in 2003~. Alain Dubresson is professor at the University of Paris-X at Nanterre and di- rector of the postgraduate school "Milieux, cultures et societes" since 2001. He also serves on the scientific council for ORSTOM, now IRD (French Research Institute for Development). Between 1990 and 1997 he served as director of the Center for Geographic Studies on Sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Dubresson is the au- thor of 10 books on the geography and demography of sub-Saharan Africa, includ- ing Villes et industries en Cote d'Ivoire (published by Karthala in 1990), Pouvoirs et cite's d'Afrique noire (written with S. Jaglin, published by Karthala in 1993), Petites et moyennes villes d 'Afrique noire (written with M. Bertrand, published by Karthala in 1997), and L'Afrique subsaharienne: Une ge'ographie du changement (written with J-P. Raison, published by Masson in 1998~. Gustavo Garza is a research professor at the Center for Demographic and Urban Development Studies at E1 Colegio de Mexico. He was director of the center during 1986-1988. He has also served as scientific advisor to the Ur- ban Development Programme of the Federal District Department (1985-1988~; associate member of the Centro de Estudios Prospectivos, A.C., Mexico City (1987-present); member of the Board of Editors of the Institute of Geography of the National University (1988-present); member of the Scholarship Selection Committee in the field of urban studies at the National Council for Science and Technology (1980-present); and general director of the Institute for Urban Stud- ies of Nuevo Leon (1994-1995~. He has published approximately 190 articles in specialized journals and 18 books on various aspects of urban economics and planning issues in Mexico. Notable works include The Urban Development of Mexico (1976), Industrialization Process of Mexico City (1985), Macroeconomic Dynamics of Mexican Cities (1994), Local Management in the Metropolitan Area of Monterrey (1998), Mexico City at the end of the Second Millennium (2000), and Urban Planning in Great Metropolis: Detroit, Monterrey and Toronto (2003~. Trudy Harpham is professor of urban development and policy at South Bank University, London. She has been one of the main researchers on urbanization and health in developing countries for the last 15 years. Her books on urbaniza- tion include In the Shadow of the City: Health and the Urban Poor in Developing Countries (written with T. Lusty and P. Vaughan, published by Oxford University

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF 511 Press in 1988~; Urbanization and Mental Health in Developing Countries (written with I. Blue, published by Avebury in 1995~; Urban Health in Developing Coun- tries: Progress and Prospects (written with M. Tanner, published by Earthscan in 1995~; and Healthy Cities in Developing Countries (written with E. Werna, I. Blue, and G. Goldstein, published by Earthscan in 1998~. She is international advisor to the World Health Organization's only Collaborating Centre for Urban Health (in South Africa). An urban geographer by training, her current interest is in urbanization and mental health, particularly with regard to the role of social support and social networks. Terry McGee is professor emeritus of Asian research. He was formerly di- rector of the Institute of Asian Research, as well as professor of geography at the University of British Columbia, Canada. He has held previous appointments in the University of Malaya, Victoria University (New Zealand), Hong Kong Uni- versity, and the Research School of Pacific Studies in the Institute of Advanced Studies at Australia National University. He is a fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences and has been president of the Canadian Geographical Associ- ation and the Canadian Council of Southeast Asian Studies. During the past 30 years, Dr. McGee has concentrated his research on development studies in the Asia Pacific region with particular attention to the processes of urbanization. He is the author and editor of more than 10 books and 150 articles dealing with these subjects. Among his books are The Southeast Asian City (1967J' The Urbaniza- tion Process in the Third World (1971), Hawkers in SoutheastAsian City Planning (1977), Theatres of Accumulation (1985), and The Mega- Urban Regions of South- eastAsia (1996~. Caroline Moser is currently senior research associate, Overseas Development Institute, and adjunct professor, New School, New York. From 1990 to 2000 she worked at The World Bank, first in the Urban Development Division, and later as lead specialist for social development in the Latin American Department. Pre- viously she was a lecturer at the London School of Economics, and before that at the Development Planning Unit, University College, London. Her recent re- search includes participatory urban appraisals of urban violence and exclusion in Colombia, Guatemala, and Jamaica, and research on urban poverty in the con- text of adjustment in Ecuador, Zambia, Philippines, and Hungary. Dr. Moser received a Ph.D. in social anthropology from Sussex University, a postgradu- ate diploma from Manchester University, and a B.A. from Durham University. Among the numerous publications for which she has been author, co-author, or editor are Gender Planning and Development: Theory, Practice and Training (1993~; Confronting Crisis: A Comparative Study of Household Responses to Poverty and Vulnerability in Four Poor Urban Communities (1996~; Violence in a Post-Confftict Context: Urban Poor Perceptions from Guatemala (2000~; Ur- ban Poor Perceptions of Violence and Exclusion in Colombia (2001~; Gender, Armed Conflict and Political Violence (2001~; Women, Human Settlement and Housing (1987~.

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512 CITIES TRANSFORMED Holly E. Reed is program officer for the Committee on Population of the Na- tional Academies. She also serves as study director for the Roundtable on the Demography of Forced Migration and has written and edited several publications on the demography of displaced persons, including Forced Migration and Mor- tality. Ms. Reed is currently a member of the International Union for the Scien- tific Study of Population's Working Group on the Demography of Conflict and Violence. She has a B.S. in foreign service and an M.A. in demography from Georgetown University. Saskia Sassen is Ralph Lewis Professor of Sociology at the University of Chicago and Centennial Visiting Professor at the London School of Economics. She is currently completing her forthcoming book Denationalization: Territory, Authority and Rights in a Global Digital Age (to be published by Princeton Uni- versity Press in 2003), based on her 5-year project on governance and accountabil- ity in a global economy. She has also just completed for UNESCO a 5-year project on sustainable human settlement for which she set up a network of researchers and activists in more than 50 countries. Her most recent books are Guests and Aliens and the edited Global Networks, Linked (published by Routledge in 2002~. A new, fully updated edition of The Global City was published in 2001. Her books have been translated into 14 languages. She serves on several editorial boards and is an advisor to several international bodies. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and chair of the new Information Technology, International Cooperation and Global Security Committee of the Social Science Research Council. David Satterthwaite is a senior fellow at the International Institute for Envi- ronment and Development and on the teaching staff of the Development Planning Unit, University College, London and the London School of Economics. He has been editor of the journal Environment and Urbanization since its foundation in 1989. Most of Dr. Satterthwaite's work since 1979 has been on issues of housing, health, environment, urban development, and rural-urban linkages. He has served as an advisor on urban issues to many international agencies including UNICEF, UN-Habitat, Department of International Development, the World Health Orga- nization, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, the Devel- opment Directorate of the European Commission, the United Nations Population Division, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, ActionAid, WaterAid, and the Brundtland Commission. He is the author or editor of 15 books on various aspects of urban development, including An Urbanizing World: Global Report on Human Settlements 1996 (published by Oxford University Press), The Environmentfor Children (published by Earthscan Publications in 1996), Environ- mental Problems in an Urbanizing World (written with J. Hardoy and D. Mitlin, published by Earthscan in 2001), The Poor Die Young: Housing and Health in Third World Cities (co-edited with J. Hardoy and S. Cairncross, published by Earthscan in 1990), Squatter Citizen: Life in the Urban Third World (written with J. Hardoy, published by Earthscan in 19891; and Urbanization and Its Implications for Child Health (published by the World Health Organization in 19881.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PANEL MEMBERS AND STAFF 513 Pravin Visar~a was director of the Institute for Economic Growth in Delhi, India. He worked closely with the Indian government's Planning Commission, Department of Statistics, Office of the Registrar General, and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. Previously he was professor and director of the Gujarat Insti- tute of Development Research, Ahmedabad. He held positions with the University of Bombay and The World Bank. He published numerous articles and books on mortality, fertility, migration, urbanization, labor force and employment, popula- tion projections, censuses and surveys, poverty, and population policy, especially in the Indian context. He also held leadership positions with many important aca- demic and policy organizations, including the Indian Association for the Study of Population, the National Sample Survey Organization of India, and the Gujarat Economic Association. His publications include The Sex Ratio of the Population of India (published by the Office of the Registrar General, New Delhi in 1971), Infant Mortality in India: Differentials and Determinants (published by Sage in 1988), Non-Agricultural Employment in India: Trends and Prospects (pub- lished by Sage in 1993), Contraceptive Use and Fertility in India: A Case Study of Gujarat (published by Sage in 1995), and Urbanization in Large Developing Countries (co-edited) (published by Clarendon Press in 1997~. Most recently, he co-edited a volume titled Urbanization in Large Developing Countries with Gavin Jones (published by Oxford University Press in 1997~. Dr. Visaria passed away in February 2001, and this volume is dedicated to his memory and his many con- tributions to the field of urban studies. Michael J. White is professor and chair of the Department of Sociology and a faculty associate for the Population Studies and Training Center at Brown Univer- sity. He has also served as senior research associate at the Urban Institute and on the faculty of Princeton University. Dr. White works broadly in the field of social demography, with a concentration in population distribution. His current research agenda includes studies of migration and environmental change, urbanization in Ghana, and immigrant adaptation in the United States. Dr. White has been in- volved in data collection efforts of the Population Studies and Training Center in developing countries, including the Coastal Ghana Population and Environment Survey, the Ethiopian Southern Region Study, and the United Nations Population Fund Migration and Health Study. His publications include American Neighbor- hoods and Residential Differentiation (published by the Russell Sage Foundation in 1987), Techniques for Estimating Net Migration (written with D. Bogue and K. Hinze, published by the Chicago Community and Family Study Center in 1982), and Urban Renewal and the Changing Residential Structure of the City (pub- lished by the Chicago Community and Family Study Center in 1981~. Dr. White is a member of the Demographic and Behavioral Sciences review panel, National Institutes of Health. He holds a B.A. in urban studies from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. Yue-man Yeung is professor of geography, director of the Hong Kong Insti- tute of Asia-Pacific Studies, and head of Shaw College of the Chinese University

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514 CITIES TRANSFORMED of Hong Kong. His rich and varied career has spanned teaching, research, inter- national development, and university administration, being divided among Singa- pore, Canada, and Hong Kong. His wide-ranging research interests have recently focused on China's coastal cities and development, South China, globalization, and Asian cities. He has published 28 books and more than 100 articles and book chapters. Recent books include Globalization and the World of Large Cities (writ- ten with Fu-chen Lo, published by UNU Press in 1998), Urban Development in Asia (published by CUHK in 1998), Guangdong (written with David Chu, pub- lished by Chinese University Press in 1998), Fujian (written with David Chu, published by Chinese University Press in 2000), Globalization and Networked Societies (published by University of Hawaii Press in 2000), and New Challenges for Development and Modernization (published by Chinese University Press in 2002~.