Workshop Information

AGENDA

Workshop on Survey Automation

The Melrose Hotel, Washington, DC

Day One: April 15, 2002

9:00

Introductions and Opening Remarks

Chester E. Bowie, U.S. Census Bureau

9:15

Overview: Problems in Current CAPI Implementations

9:15

CAPI Implementation of the Survey on Income and Program Participation

Pat Doyle, U.S. Census Bureau

10:30

Break

10:40

Idealized CAPI Implementation from Computer Science Perspective

Jesse Poore, University of Tennessee-Knoxville

11:20

Automation and Federal Statistical Surveys: Need for a Bridge

Robert Groves, University of Michigan

11:30

Lunch

12:30

Documentation of Complex CAPI Questionnaires

12:30

Understanding the “Documentation Problem” in Survey Automation

Tom Piazza, University of California at Berkeley

1:15

The TADEQ Project

Jelke Bethlehem, Statistics Netherlands

2:00

Computer Science Approaches: Visualization Tools & Software Metrics

Thomas McCabe, McCabe Technologies

2:45

Break

3:00

Tutorial on Software Engineering and Model-Based Testing

Harry Robinson, Microsoft



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Workshop Information AGENDA Workshop on Survey Automation The Melrose Hotel, Washington, DC Day One: April 15, 2002 9:00 Introductions and Opening Remarks Chester E. Bowie, U.S. Census Bureau 9:15 Overview: Problems in Current CAPI Implementations 9:15 CAPI Implementation of the Survey on Income and Program Participation Pat Doyle, U.S. Census Bureau 10:30 Break 10:40 Idealized CAPI Implementation from Computer Science Perspective Jesse Poore, University of Tennessee-Knoxville 11:20 Automation and Federal Statistical Surveys: Need for a Bridge Robert Groves, University of Michigan 11:30 Lunch 12:30 Documentation of Complex CAPI Questionnaires 12:30 Understanding the “Documentation Problem” in Survey Automation Tom Piazza, University of California at Berkeley 1:15 The TADEQ Project Jelke Bethlehem, Statistics Netherlands 2:00 Computer Science Approaches: Visualization Tools & Software Metrics Thomas McCabe, McCabe Technologies 2:45 Break 3:00 Tutorial on Software Engineering and Model-Based Testing Harry Robinson, Microsoft

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3:40 Testing of Computerized Instruments 3:40 Case Example of Software Testing Robert L. Smith, (Formerly) Computer Curriculum Corp. 4:10 An Integrated View of Survey Automation Larry Markosian, Independent Consultant 4:35 Practitioner Needs, and Reactions to Computer Science Approaches Mark Pierzchala, Westat 5:15 Reactions and Floor Discussion Day Two: April 16, 2002 9:00 Emerging Technologies in Survey Automation 9:00 Web-Based Data Collection Roger Tourangeau, Joint Program on Survey Methodology 9:40 Interface of Survey Methods with Geographic Information Systems Sarah Nusser, Iowa State University 10:20 Prospects for Survey Collection Using Pen-Based Computers Martin Meyer & Jay Levinsohn, Research Triangle Institute 11:00 Break 11:15 Panel Discussion: How Can Computer Science and Survey Methodology Best Interact in the Future? Mick Couper (moderator), University of Michigan Reg Baker, MS Interactive Bill Kalsbeek, University of North Carolina Tony Manners, Office for National Statistics, United Kingdom Susan Schechter, U.S. Office of Management and Budget 12:15 Lunch, Final Comments, and Adjourn

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LIST OF WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS AND ATTENDEES In the following list, the names of workshop participants—those with a planned speaking role—are preceded by •. Those invited guests and attendees who asked questions or made comments at the workshop— and for whom voices or surrounding speech made identification in the proceedings text possible—are preceded by †. Our apologies to those audience members whose contributions to the workshop could not be positively identified from the workshop tapes and whose contributions are unfortunately cloaked by the label PARTICIPANT in the text. Tammy Anderson, U.S. Census Bureau Karen Bagwell, U.S. Census Bureau •Reg Baker, MS Interactive †David Banks, Food and Drug Administration Patrick Benton, U.S. Census Bureau Lew Berman, National Center for Health Statistics •Jelke Bethlehem, Statistics Netherlands Chester E. Bowie, U.S. Census Bureau Janis Lea Brown, U.S. Census Bureau Lynda Carlson, National Science Foundation Constance Citro, National Research Council Cynthia Clark, U.S. Census Bureau •Michael Cohen, National Research Council Quentin Coleman, National Agricultural Statistics Service •Daniel Cork, National Research Council Joe Cortez, U.S. Census Bureau •Mick Couper, University of Michigan Kathy Creighton, U.S. Census Bureau †Cathryn Dippo, Bureau of Labor Statistics •Pat Doyle, U.S. Census Bureau †Ed Dyer, U.S. Census Bureau Jimmie Givens, National Center for Health Statistics Nancy Gordon, U.S. Census Bureau Ann Green, Social Science Statistical Laboratory, Yale University •Robert Groves, University of Michigan Doug Guan, U.S. Census Bureau Susan Hauan, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Heather Holbert, U.S. Census Bureau Bernie Greene, National Center for Education Statistics Tim Hart, Bureau of Justice Statistics •William Kalsbeek, University of North Carolina

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Howard Kanarek, U.S. Census Bureau Patsy Klaus, Bureau of Justice Statistics Cheryl Landman, U.S. Census Bureau •Jay Levinsohn, Research Triangle Institute Jennifer Madans, National Center for Health Statistics •Tony Manners, Office for National Statistics, United Kingdom Tim Marshall, U.S. Census Bureau •Lawrence Markosian, independent consultant •Thomas McCabe, McCabe Technologies •Martin Meyer, Research Triangle Institute Bill Mockovak, Bureau of Labor Statistics Steve Newman, Westat •Sarah Nusser, Iowa State University Jim O’Reilly, Westat †Adrienne Oneto, U.S. Census Bureau Andrea Piani, U.S. Census Bureau •Tom Piazza, University of California at Berkeley •Mark Pierzchala, Westat (at time of workshop) and Mathematica Policy Research •Jesse Poore, University of Tennessee-Knoxville •Daryl Pregibon, AT&T Labs–Research Ray Ravaglia, Education Program for Gifted Youth, Stanford University Callie Rennison, Bureau of Justice Statistics •Harry Robinson,Microsoft Johanna Rupp, U.S. Census Bureau •Susan Schechter, Office of Management and Budget •Michael Siri, National Research Council •Robert L. Smith, Computer Curriculum Corporation †Miron Straf, National Research Council Libbie Stephenson, Institute for Social Science Research, University of California at Los Angeles Anne Stratton, National Center for Health Statistics Wendy Thomas, Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota •Roger Tourangeau, University of Maryland †Clyde Tucker, Bureau of Labor Statistics David Uglow, Mathematica Policy Research Laarni Verdolin, U.S. Census Bureau Andrew White, National Research Council Arnie Wilcox, National Agricultural Statistics Service