Biographical Sketches of Workshop Participants and Staff

Reginald Baker is chief operating officer for Market Strategies, Inc., a full service market research firm located in Southfield, Michigan, and specializing in electric and gas utilities, information technology, health care, and public policy. He is responsible for all of MSI’s sampling, interviewing, data processing, and information technology operations. In addition, he is president of MSInteractive, a Market Strategies company with a special focus on Internet-based research. Prior to joining MSI in 1995, he worked for 11 years at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, where he was vice president for research operations. Prior to joining NORC, he served as president of Data Use and Access Laboratories in Arlington, VA. His research interests include data quality impacts of new data collection technologies, interviewer training for computer-assisted person interviewing, and future developments in computer-assisted information collection.

Jelke G. Bethlehem is senior advisor of the Department of Statistical Methods of Statistics Netherlands. He joined Statistics Netherlands in 1978 and served as head of the Statistical Informatics Department (a research unit within the Division of Research and Development) from 1987 to 1996; the department is responsible for development of software for processing survey data, including the Blaise system for computer-assisted survey data collection and the StatLine system for electronic dissemination of statistical publications. He is involved in research projects in the areas of survey methodology and coordinates European research projects. He is also part-time professor in statistical information processing at the University of Amsterdam. His research interests include treatment of nonresponse in survey data, disclosure control of published survey data, user-friendly software for statistical analysis, and graphical techniques in statistics. He has a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the University of Amsterdam.

Michael L. Cohen is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as co-study director for the Panel



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Biographical Sketches of Workshop Participants and Staff Reginald Baker is chief operating officer for Market Strategies, Inc., a full service market research firm located in Southfield, Michigan, and specializing in electric and gas utilities, information technology, health care, and public policy. He is responsible for all of MSI’s sampling, interviewing, data processing, and information technology operations. In addition, he is president of MSInteractive, a Market Strategies company with a special focus on Internet-based research. Prior to joining MSI in 1995, he worked for 11 years at the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, where he was vice president for research operations. Prior to joining NORC, he served as president of Data Use and Access Laboratories in Arlington, VA. His research interests include data quality impacts of new data collection technologies, interviewer training for computer-assisted person interviewing, and future developments in computer-assisted information collection. Jelke G. Bethlehem is senior advisor of the Department of Statistical Methods of Statistics Netherlands. He joined Statistics Netherlands in 1978 and served as head of the Statistical Informatics Department (a research unit within the Division of Research and Development) from 1987 to 1996; the department is responsible for development of software for processing survey data, including the Blaise system for computer-assisted survey data collection and the StatLine system for electronic dissemination of statistical publications. He is involved in research projects in the areas of survey methodology and coordinates European research projects. He is also part-time professor in statistical information processing at the University of Amsterdam. His research interests include treatment of nonresponse in survey data, disclosure control of published survey data, user-friendly software for statistical analysis, and graphical techniques in statistics. He has a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the University of Amsterdam. Michael L. Cohen is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as co-study director for the Panel

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on Research on Future Census Methods and staff to the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. He previously assisted the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. He also directed the Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems. Formerly, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer at the Department of Statistics, Princeton University. His general area of research is the use of statistics in public policy, with particular interest in census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He has been elected a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University. Daniel L. Cork is a program officer for the Committee on National Statistics and responsible staff officer for the Workshop on Survey Automation. He is currently assisting the Panel to Review the 2000 Census and serving as co-study director of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods. His research interests include quantitative criminology (particularly space-time dynamics in homicide), Bayesian statistics, and statistics in sports. He holds a B.S. degree in statistics from George Washington University and an M.S. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. Mick P. Couper is a senior associate research scientist in the Survey Methodology Program in the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan, an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Michigan, and a research associate professor in the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland, College Park. He previously worked at the Census Bureau as a visiting researcher from 1992 to 1994. He has published in the areas of survey and census nonresponse and the use of computer technology for data collection. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Rhodes University in Grahamstown, South Africa. Patricia J. Doyle is the survey improvement coordinator for the Demographic Directorate at the U.S. Census Bureau. A fellow of the American Statistical Association, she has been working with complex demographic surveys since 1976, concentrating on data base development, documentation, and microsimulation modeling. Most recently she spearheaded the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) Methods Panel Project, a 5-year project to systematically develop and test an alterna-

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tive automated SIPP instrument. She co-edited the recent book, Confidentiality, Disclosure, and Data Access: Theory and Practical Applications for Statistical Agencies, and organized a conference on that same topic in January 2002. Her efforts to improve automated surveys include an analysis of the impact of automation on demographic surveys, design and development of automated instrument documentation procedures, and developing guidelines for documenting demographic surveys. She has an M.S. in applied mathematics from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Robert Groves is director of the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan, where he is also a member of the Survey Methodology Research Program. His research interests include survey methods, measurement of survey errors, and survey nonresponse. His current research focuses on theory-building in survey participation and models of nonresponse reduction and adjustment. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, former president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, and chair of the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Statistical Association. He has an A.B. degree from Dart-mouth College and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Joel L. Horowitz is professor of economics at Northwestern University; he was previously professor of economics at the University of Iowa and a senior operations research analyst at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. His primary area of research is in theoretical and applied econometrics, with particular concentrations in semiparametric estimation, bootstrap methods, discrete choice analysis, and estimation and inference with incomplete data. He is an elected fellow of the Econometric Society, a winner of the Richard Stone Prize in Applied Econometrics, and a recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt Award for Senior U.S. Scientists. He has a B.S. in physics from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in physics from Cornell University. William Kalsbeek is professor of biostatistics and director of the Survey Research Unit at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. His prior experience includes statistical research with the Office of Research and Methodology at the National Center for Health Statistics and at the Sampling Research and Design Center at the Research Triangle Institute. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the Biometrics Society and the American Public Health Association. His research interests and areas of expertise are in biostatistics, survey design

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and research, spinal cord injuries, and assessment. He has M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. Jay Levinsohn is manager of technology issues at the Research Triangle Institute. Since joining RTI in 1974, he served as manager of information technology services from 1990 through 1998 and as senior research programmer/analyst since 1998. He is technical support manager for the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, in which capacity he manages a technical support unit charged to assist a corps of 1,000 field staff running two shifts per day, seven days a week. Other projects he has directed include the Baseline Survey for Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation, the Youth Attitude Tracking Study, and the Household Technology Survey. He has a B.S. in psychology and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in quantitative psychology, all from the University of North Carolina. Tony Manners is director of the research group in the Social Survey Division of the United Kingdom’s Office for National Statistics, which is responsible for a range of continuous household surveys, evaluation research, and survey integration. He also has other projects like CAI documentation, including the TADEQ project, and development of web-CASI for official statistics. Until recently he was responsible for the survey contribution to UK National Statistics’ program of harmonization of concepts and questions. He has worked in government social surveys for 27 years, including managing the Labour Force (LFS) and the Family Expenditure surveys during periods of extensive redevelopment of survey automation. He led the introduction of computer assisted interviewing in major UK social surveys, on the 1990 LFS. He has chaired two key users groups for Blaise: the International Blaise Users’ Group (1992–2001); and the group of corporate license-holders which, in partnership with Statistics Netherlands, guides the strategic development of Blaise (since 1997, ongoing). He has an M.Phil. in social anthropology from London University. Lawrence Markosian founded Reasoning, Inc., in 1984 and served as vice president for applications development from 1987 through 1995. From 1999 to 2001, he served as product manager for InstantQA, a tool for automated software defect detection that is Reasoning’s principal product (InstantQA has since been renamed Illuma). During his tenure at Reasoning, he also served as director of training from 1996 through 1999. Since leaving Reasoning in 2001, he has served as senior technology transfer consultant at the NASA Ames Research Center, assisting

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in the development of survey software tools and engineering practices within NASA. He has a B.A. in mathematics from Brown University and was in the doctoral program in logic and philosophy at Stanford University. Thomas J. McCabe, founder of McCabe & Associates in Columbia, Maryland, is a developer of software metrics and tools for software development, testing and maintenance. In 1998 he sold his business to venture capitalists and now heads McCabe Technologies. In 1999 he was appointed to lead the Washington, DC, chapter of the Chief Executive Officers (CEO) Club, a group consisting of founders and entrepreneurs. He also organized Mentors, a group of CEOs who have built, run, and sold companies and are in pursuit of their next challenge. He was the 1998 Stevens Award Lecturer on Software Development Methods. He has a B.S. from Providence College and an M.S. from the University of Connecticut, both in mathematics. Martin Meyer joined Research Triangle Institute in 1998, where he is research programmer/analyst in the Research Computing Division. Currently, his main responsibilities are for software design and programming in support of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, which is sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Previously, he held a faculty position at Old Dominion University, where he taught and performed research in digital systems design. He has also worked and consulted for the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, the military’s Joint Training Analysis and Simulation Center, the Army’s Military Transportation Management Command, and the Virgnia Modeling Analysis and Simulation Center. He has B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical and computer engineering from North Carolina State University. Sarah Nusser is professor-in-charge of the Statistical Laboratory Survey Section and associate professor of statistics at Iowa State University. Her research interests include survey methods for welfare surveys, the use of statistics in biological and ecological studies, and computer-assisted survey information collection systems. Nusser has collaborated on a number of programs for the National Resources Conservation Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She has a M.S. degree in botany from North Carolina State University and a Ph.D. in statistics from Iowa State University.

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Thomas Piazza is the head of the Survey Documentation and Analysis (SDA) project in the Computer-Assisted Survey Methods Program at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the senior survey statistician at the University’s Survey Research Center and teaches applied sampling in the School of Public Health. He has a Ph.D. in sociology and many years of experience in designing, administering, documenting, and analyzing surveys. Mark Pierzchala is senior analyst for computer-assisted interviewing methodology in the Washington, DC, office of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. At the time of the Workshop on Survey Automation, he was senior systems analyst at Westat. Prior to joining Westat, he served as a mathematical statistician and a technical expert at the National Agricultural Statistics Service. His research interests include data editing of survey-collected data, development of complex CASIC instruments, specification of metadata for CASIC instrumentation and survey execution, usability for interviewers and data editors, and reduction of survey costs through integration and elimination of survey tasks. He has a masters degree in mathematical statistics from Michigan State University. Jesse H. Poore is professor of computer science and software engineering at the University of Tennessee. In 2000, he was named director of the University of Tennessee-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Science Alliance. He conducts research in cleanroom software engineering and teaches software engineering courses. He has held academic appointments at Florida State University and Georgia Tech, has served as a National Science Foundation rotator, worked in the Executive Office of the President, and was executive director of the Committee on Science and Technology in the U.S. House of Representatives. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has a Ph.D. in information in computer science from Georgia Tech. Daryl Pregibon is division manager of the Statistics Research Department at AT&T Laboratories, a department responsible for developing a theoretical and computational foundation of statistics for very large data sets. Pregibon has nurtured interactions throughout AT&T, in fiber and microelectronics manufacturing, network reliability, customer satisfaction, fraud detection, targeted marketing, and regulatory statistics. His research contributions have changed from mathematical statistics to computational statistics and include such topics as expert systems for data analysis, data visualization, application-specific data structures for statistics, and large-scale data analysis. A fellow of the American Sta-

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tistical Association, he received a masters degree in statistics from the University of Waterloo and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Toronto. Harry Robinson leads software test productivity and model-based testing initiatives as part of Microsoft’s Six Sigma Team. Prior to joining Microsoft in 1998, he was with Hewlett Packard for 3 years and with Bell Labs for 10 years. He teaches and consults on model-based testing within Microsoft and often speaks at industry conferences on test automation. He is currently creating a course on intelligent test automation for Microsoft Technical Education. A software developer for six years before switching to testing, he has a B.A. in religion from Dartmouth College and B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Susan Schechter is senior statistician in the Statistical Policy Office of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. She has spent her career working for the federal government, first at the Census Bureau and later at the Army Research Laboratory and the National Center for Health Statistics. Currently, she is the principal reviewer for all Census Bureau surveys and censuses at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Her OMB responsibilities also include working on implementation issues related to federal standards for data on race and ethnicity as well as measurement issues related to improving statistics on welfare, children, eduction, and health. She has a masters degree in human development research from Antioch University and completed undergraduate work at the University of Maryland, College Park. Robert L. Smith is a former vice president of KnowledgeSet Corporation and is a former senior vice president of the Computer Curriculum Corporation (now NCS Learn, a division of NCS Pearson). He previously held an academic appointment in computer science at Rutgers University. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University. Roger Tourangeau is director of the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland and a senior research scientist at the University of Michigan. He has been a survey researcher for more than 20 years. His research focuses on attitude and opinion measurement and on differences across methods of data collection; he also has extensive experience as an applied sampler. Tourangeau is well known for his work on the cognitive aspects of survey methodology and is the lead author of The Psychology of Survey Responses. Before joining JPSM

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and SRC, Tourangeau was a senior methodologist at the Gallup Organization, where he designed and selected samples and carried out methodological studies. Before that, he was at the National Opinion Research Center, where he founded and directed the Statistics and Methodology Center. There he carried out methodological studies and developed and executed sample designs for many federal and academic surveys. Named a fellow of the American Statistical Association in 1999, he has served on the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly and on the Census Joint Advisory Panel as member and alter chair of the ASA Subcommittee. Tourangeau has a Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University.