Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$34.75



View/Hide Left Panel

About the Authors

Maryanne Loughry is Pedro Arrube Tutor at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford, and also an adjunct lecturer in the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Faculty of Education, Humanities, Law and Theology at Flinders University of South Australia. She is a psychologist with research interests in the field of health psychology, child psychology, communication and development, particularly in reference to refugee work. In the late 1980s she was actively involved in the Philippines and Hong Kong, as a counsellor and trainer in the Vietnamese camps. From 1993 to 1995 she worked in Vietnam with a Scandinavian agency assisting the Vietnamese government to address the needs of the returnee population. In recent years she has trained refugee workers in Southeast Asia, Africa, Sri Lanka, and the Middle East. She is a member of the Academic Board of the Diploma in Community Health for the Gaza Community Mental Health Programme and the Islamic University, Gaza, and a consultant for staff development to the Jesuit Refugee Service. Currently, she is researching the psychosocial adjustment of former child soldiers in Sierra Leone and Northern Uganda. Her doctoral research focused on the effects of detention on Vietnamese asylum seekers. Maryanne is the co-convener of the Psychosocial Working Group—an academic/practitioner group investigating different approaches to psychosocial interventions.

Carola Eyber is a lecturer at the Centre for International Health Studies at Queen Margaret University College in Edinburgh. She is a South



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 129
About the Authors Maryanne Loughry is Pedro Arrube Tutor at the Refugee Studies Centre, University of Oxford, and also an adjunct lecturer in the Faculty of Health Sciences and the Faculty of Education, Humanities, Law and Theology at Flinders University of South Australia. She is a psychologist with research interests in the field of health psychology, child psychology, communication and development, particularly in reference to refugee work. In the late 1980s she was actively involved in the Philippines and Hong Kong, as a counsellor and trainer in the Vietnamese camps. From 1993 to 1995 she worked in Vietnam with a Scandinavian agency assisting the Vietnamese government to address the needs of the returnee population. In recent years she has trained refugee workers in Southeast Asia, Africa, Sri Lanka, and the Middle East. She is a member of the Academic Board of the Diploma in Community Health for the Gaza Community Mental Health Programme and the Islamic University, Gaza, and a consultant for staff development to the Jesuit Refugee Service. Currently, she is researching the psychosocial adjustment of former child soldiers in Sierra Leone and Northern Uganda. Her doctoral research focused on the effects of detention on Vietnamese asylum seekers. Maryanne is the co-convener of the Psychosocial Working Group—an academic/practitioner group investigating different approaches to psychosocial interventions. Carola Eyber is a lecturer at the Centre for International Health Studies at Queen Margaret University College in Edinburgh. She is a South

OCR for page 129
African psychologist who has worked in the areas of inter-cultural conflict, racism, and the transformation of the South African education system. In recent years, she has focused primarily on psychosocial issues of forced migrants and people affected by armed conflict. Current research interests include the interrelationship between poverty, armed conflict, and psychosocial well-being; the coping strategies of children and young people in situations of armed conflict; and public health issues and debates on forced migration. She has a Ph.D. from the Centre for International Health Studies at Queen Margaret University College in Edinburgh; her topic was the psychosocial well-being and the coping strategies of youths in Angola, including the cultural, religious, psychological, and communal strategies used by the displaced in dealing with the consequences of the war.

OCR for page 129
The Committee on Population was established by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1983 to bring the knowledge and methods of the population sciences to bear on major issues of science and public policy. The committee’s work includes both basic studies of fertility, health and mortality, and migration, and applied studies aimed at improving programs for the public health and welfare in the United States and in developing countries. The committee also fosters communication among researchers in different disciplines and countries and policy makers in government and international agencies. The Roundtable on the Demography of Forced Migration was established by the Committee on Population of the National Academy of Sciences in 1999. The Roundtable’s purpose is to serve as an interdisciplinary, nonpartisan focal point for taking stock of what is known about demographic patterns in refugee situations, applying this knowledge base to assist both policy makers and relief workers, and stimulating new directions for innovation and scientific inquiry in this growing field of study. The Roundtable meets yearly and has also organized a series of workshops (held concurrently with Roundtable meetings) on some of the specific aspects of the demography of refugee and refugee-like situations, including mortality patterns, demographic assessment techniques, and research ethics in complex humanitarian emergencies. The Roundtable is composed of experts from academia, government, philanthropy, and international organizations. OTHER PUBLICATIONS OF THE ROUNDTABLE ON THE DEMOGRAPHY OF FORCED MIGRATION Initial Steps in Rebuilding the Health Sector in East Timor (2003) Malaria Control During Mass Population Movements and Natural Disasters (2003) Research Ethics in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Summary of a Workshop (2002) Demographic Assessment Techniques in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Summary of a Workshop (2002) Forced Migration and Mortality (2001)

OCR for page 129
This page in the original is blank.