Appendix D
About the Authors

Jim Tulloch has worked in international public health for the past 27 years as a clinician, researcher, technical consultant, and administrator. He has worked on control of smallpox, diarrhea, and acute respiratory diseases and on malaria research. From 1992 he oversaw the development by the World Health Organization (WHO) of the strategy of integrated management of childhood illness. He was director of child and adolescent health and development at WHO headquarters before being seconded to the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor, where he led the UN health sector team working with East Timorese counterparts to rebuild the health system during 2000 and 2001. He is currently WHO representative and team leader in Cambodia. He has a bachelor of medicine/bachelor of surgery (MBBS) degree from the University of Adelaide, Australia.

Fadia Saadah is currently the sector manager for health, nutrition, and population for the East Asia and Pacific Region at the World Bank. She has worked in the areas of health policy and strategies, health system reforms, and maternal and child health programs, as well as nutrition. She was the task team leader for the initial effort of reconstruction and development of the health sector in East Timor that resulted in the first health sector program. She has a PhD in population studies and a master's degree in biostatistics from Johns Hopkins University. She also has a master's degree in epidemiology from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, where she worked before coming to the United States.



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Initial Steps in Rebuilding the Health Sector in East Timor Appendix D About the Authors Jim Tulloch has worked in international public health for the past 27 years as a clinician, researcher, technical consultant, and administrator. He has worked on control of smallpox, diarrhea, and acute respiratory diseases and on malaria research. From 1992 he oversaw the development by the World Health Organization (WHO) of the strategy of integrated management of childhood illness. He was director of child and adolescent health and development at WHO headquarters before being seconded to the United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor, where he led the UN health sector team working with East Timorese counterparts to rebuild the health system during 2000 and 2001. He is currently WHO representative and team leader in Cambodia. He has a bachelor of medicine/bachelor of surgery (MBBS) degree from the University of Adelaide, Australia. Fadia Saadah is currently the sector manager for health, nutrition, and population for the East Asia and Pacific Region at the World Bank. She has worked in the areas of health policy and strategies, health system reforms, and maternal and child health programs, as well as nutrition. She was the task team leader for the initial effort of reconstruction and development of the health sector in East Timor that resulted in the first health sector program. She has a PhD in population studies and a master's degree in biostatistics from Johns Hopkins University. She also has a master's degree in epidemiology from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, where she worked before coming to the United States.

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Initial Steps in Rebuilding the Health Sector in East Timor Rui Maria de Araujo was a house surgeon at Dili Referral Hospital, East Timor, from 1994 to 1998. During the transition of his country to independence, he was head of the Policy and Planning Section of the Division of Health Services in the First Transitional Government of East Timor. In June 2001 he became head of the Division of Health Services, and in September 2001 he was sworn in as the first minister for health in the Second Transitional Government. Since May 2002 he has been the minister for health of the First Constitutional Government of the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste. He has an MD from Udayana Medical School, Bali, Indonesia and an MPH from Otago University, Dunedin, New Zealand. Rui Paulo de Jesus worked as a district medical officer and as a general practitioner before the crisis of late 1999. He served as a member of the Interim Health Authority from its creation in February 2000. He was head of the Health Services Delivery Section of the Division of Health Services in the First Transitional Government of East Timor. He was also an Expanded Programme of Immunisation (EPI) program consultant for UNICEF in Dili, East Timor. He acted as director general of health until 2002, when he left to pursue a master's degree in public health and epidemiology at the University of Hawaii. He has an MD from the Faculty of Medicine, Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. Sergio Lobo is a surgeon, and in 2000 he was the only East Timorese with a clinical specialist qualification. He returned to his country in late 1999 and was instrumental in setting up the East Timor Health Professionals Working Group, which he chaired. As coordinator of the Interim Health Authority from its creation in February 2000, he played a key role throughout the first year of the reconstruction of the health system. Isabel Hemming has had over 15 years experience in providing technical and management assistance internationally, in both post-conflict and development situations. She has worked with NGOs, international organizations, UN agencies (including UNICEF and WHO), donors, and the World Bank. Her work in the past five years has focused on support and assistance to ministries of health in Tajikistan, East Timor, and Afghanistan, primarily in the areas of health policy, planning, and reform. Other countries in which she has worked include Azerbaijan, Iraq, Pakistan, Somalia, and Sudan. She has a PhD in anthropology from UCLA.

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Initial Steps in Rebuilding the Health Sector in East Timor Janet Nassim is a senior operations officer, health, nutrition and population at the World Bank. She was a member of the Joint Donor Mission that prepared the first Trust Fund for East Timor-supported Health Sector Rehabilitation and Development project, and has been involved ever since. In addition to working in Timor Leste, she has worked in countries of the Middle East. Trained as a demographer, she has worked at the World Bank since 1987, with a focus on population and reproductive health, an area in which she has written several publications. Ms. Nassim has degrees in sociology from London University, in social work from Birmingham University, and in demography from Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. Ian Morris is a senior human resource specialist in the East Asia Human Development Unit of the World Bank and is now based in the Bank's Sydney office, where he is responsible for coordinating health, education, and social protection programs for the World Bank in East Timor, Papua New Guinea, and the Pacific Islands. Since October 2000, he has led the World Bank team and joint donor review missions that have supervised the first Health Sector Rehabilitation Project and prepared and supervised the second project. He has extensive experience with the World Bank working on social sector programs in Pakistan, Nepal, and the Pacific Islands and in December 2001 led the international team responsible for the initial needs assessment for the health sector in Afghanistan. Prior to joining the World Bank, he worked as a development consultant in South and East Asia for 8 years and for the government of Papua New Guinea for 10 years. He has an honors degree in economics from La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.

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Initial Steps in Rebuilding the Health Sector in East Timor The Committee on Population was established by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1983 to bring the knowledge and methods of the population sciences to bear on major issues of science and public policy. The committee's work includes both basic studies of fertility, health and mortality, and migration, and applied studies aimed at improving programs for the public health and welfare in the United States and in developing countries. The committee also fosters communication among researchers in different disciplines and countries and policy makers in government and international agencies. The Roundtable on the Demography of Forced Migration was established by the Committee on Population of the National Academy of Sciences in 1999. The Roundtable's purpose is to serve as an interdisciplinary, nonpartisan focal point for taking stock of what is known about demographic patterns in refugee situations, applying this knowledge base to assist both policy makers and relief workers, and stimulating new directions for innovation and scientific inquiry in this growing field of study. The Roundtable meets yearly and has also organized a series of workshops (held concurrently with Roundtable meetings) on some of the specific aspects of the demography of refugee and refugee-like situations, including mortality patterns, demographic assessment techniques, and research ethics in complex humanitarian emergencies. The Roundtable is composed of experts from academia, government, philanthropy, and international organizations. OTHER PUBLICATIONS OF THE ROUNDTABLE ON THE DEMOGRAPHY OF FORCED MIGRATION Malaria Control During Mass Population Movements and Natural Disasters (2003) Research Ethics in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Summary of a Workshop (2002) Demographic Assessment Techniques in Complex Humanitarian Emergencies: Summary of a Workshop (2002) Forced Migration and Mortality (2001)