B Biographies of Workshop Participants

David G. Cotts is a management consultant specializing in advising corporate and government facilities and administrative managers and their management teams. A graduate of West Point, he has an M.S. in civil engineering from Iowa State University. He is both a registered professional engineer (P.E.) and a certified facility manager (CFM). He served worldwide during a 22-year career with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1981 he left the Army to assist in the establishment of facility management at The World Bank headquarters in Washington, DC. He employed an international staff there in a variety of operational, planning, and design management positions prior to retirement. Mr. Cotts is past president of the International Facility Management Association and a member of its first class of Fellows. He founded a facility management certificate program at The George Washington University and managed that program there and at George Mason University for 8 years. He continues to teach and write extensively on facility management, customer-oriented services, and innovative contracting. Mr. Cotts is the author of the Handbook of Facility Management, 2d ed., published by the American Management Association, and is the co-author, with Stormy Friday, of Quality Facility Management. His new book, The FM’s Guide to Finance and Budget, co-authored with Ed Rondeau, will be published by the American Management Association in 2003.

Jill Dowling is the Director of Cultural Resources for Lee and Associates, Inc., a landscape design and urban planning firm in Washington, DC. She holds a master’s degree in heritage preservation from Georgia State University, and has 10 years of experience in historic preservation and cultural resource planning and management. Ms. Dowling was a primary author of the draft historic structure report and preservation plan for Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wisconsin home, Taliesin, a National Landmark. Notably, she also developed an evaluation methodology and preservation plan for Maryland’s Historic Bridges (2000), and worked with environmental scientists to quantify and analyze air pollution impacts on World Heritage Sites in Asia for UNESCO’s Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (1999). Before coming to Lee and Associates, Ms. Dowling applied the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Main Street model on Capitol Hill as the founding Executive Director of Washington, DC’s first “Main Street,” Barracks Row/8th Street SE. In this capacity, she directed an architectural survey, extended the Capitol Hill Historic District, and developed design guidelines and a heritage trail as tools to support commercial revitalization and economic development. Ms. Dowling is currently a panel member of the NRC Transportation Research Board’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program project: Evaluating Cultural Resource Significance Using Information Technology.

Martha Droge served for 7 1/2 years as a Special Agent in the U.S. Department of State’s Diplomatic Security Service. As a federal law enforcement officer, she conducted criminal investigations and implemented physical security, personal security, and counter-terrorism programs domestically and at U.S. embassies abroad. Ms. Droge holds graduate degrees in both landscape architecture and urban & environmental planning. She currently specializes in master



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B Biographies of Workshop Participants David G. Cotts is a management consultant specializing in advising corporate and government facilities and administrative managers and their management teams. A graduate of West Point, he has an M.S. in civil engineering from Iowa State University. He is both a registered professional engineer (P.E.) and a certified facility manager (CFM). He served worldwide during a 22-year career with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 1981 he left the Army to assist in the establishment of facility management at The World Bank headquarters in Washington, DC. He employed an international staff there in a variety of operational, planning, and design management positions prior to retirement. Mr. Cotts is past president of the International Facility Management Association and a member of its first class of Fellows. He founded a facility management certificate program at The George Washington University and managed that program there and at George Mason University for 8 years. He continues to teach and write extensively on facility management, customer-oriented services, and innovative contracting. Mr. Cotts is the author of the Handbook of Facility Management, 2d ed., published by the American Management Association, and is the co-author, with Stormy Friday, of Quality Facility Management. His new book, The FM’s Guide to Finance and Budget, co-authored with Ed Rondeau, will be published by the American Management Association in 2003. Jill Dowling is the Director of Cultural Resources for Lee and Associates, Inc., a landscape design and urban planning firm in Washington, DC. She holds a master’s degree in heritage preservation from Georgia State University, and has 10 years of experience in historic preservation and cultural resource planning and management. Ms. Dowling was a primary author of the draft historic structure report and preservation plan for Frank Lloyd Wright’s Wisconsin home, Taliesin, a National Landmark. Notably, she also developed an evaluation methodology and preservation plan for Maryland’s Historic Bridges (2000), and worked with environmental scientists to quantify and analyze air pollution impacts on World Heritage Sites in Asia for UNESCO’s Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (1999). Before coming to Lee and Associates, Ms. Dowling applied the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Main Street model on Capitol Hill as the founding Executive Director of Washington, DC’s first “Main Street,” Barracks Row/8th Street SE. In this capacity, she directed an architectural survey, extended the Capitol Hill Historic District, and developed design guidelines and a heritage trail as tools to support commercial revitalization and economic development. Ms. Dowling is currently a panel member of the NRC Transportation Research Board’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program project: Evaluating Cultural Resource Significance Using Information Technology. Martha Droge served for 7 1/2 years as a Special Agent in the U.S. Department of State’s Diplomatic Security Service. As a federal law enforcement officer, she conducted criminal investigations and implemented physical security, personal security, and counter-terrorism programs domestically and at U.S. embassies abroad. Ms. Droge holds graduate degrees in both landscape architecture and urban & environmental planning. She currently specializes in master

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planning for cultural institutions and university campuses at Ayers/Saint/Gross Architects in Baltimore, Maryland. William Dupont, AIA, is the Graham Gund Architect of the National Trust, a private, nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress in 1949 whose mission is to provide leadership, education, and advocacy to save America’s diverse historic places and revitalize communities. Mr. Dupont directs or facilitates architectural and landscape projects at twenty-one National Trust Historic Sites, and also collaborates on issues of collections care as well as educational and interpretive programs. Predominantly focused on restoration and maintenance projects, Mr. Dupont also provides oversight and direction for the Associate Sites Program (launched in spring 2002) and the opening of the President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument as a historic site. Mr. Dupont, a licensed Architect, graduated from Brown University. He received a master of architecture degree and certificate in historic preservation from the University of Pennsylvania, and was awarded a traveling fellowship from Harvard University to serve as a recording architect on the Sardis Expedition’s archaeological excavation. Prior to joining the Trust in 1996, Mr. Dupont worked in various architectural offices in the Philadelphia area, and also served more than 3 years as the Historical Architect for a program in New Jersey that distributed $22 million in matching funds for preservation projects during his tenure. Alan R. Edgar is a Vice President and Senior Project Manager at Graphic Systems, Inc. (GSI) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He is currently managing multiple government-sector projects involving facilities information assessment, business process improvement, technology evaluation, application implementation, and education. He provides research and development support for GSI in the areas of facilities information commissioning, management, integration, and end-user support. His major areas of interest are integrated life cycle approaches to the capture, management, and use of architectural and facilities information; developing and implementing more natural interfaces between sources of information, storage and retrieval mechanisms, and end-users; and integrating workflow process engines into CAFM applications. Mr. Edgar holds bachelor and master of architecture degrees from Kansas State University. Volker Hartkopf is a professor in the School of Architecture and Director of the Center of Building Performance at Carnegie Mellon University. He teaches design and building performance in the professional, master’s, and doctoral programs. He has completed research and demonstration projects in the United States and abroad in industrial architecture, housing, commercial buildings, energy conservation, and whole building performance. Dr. Hartkopf was instrumental in establishing North America’s first multidisciplinary graduate program in architecture, civil engineering, and urban affairs in 1975 with grants from the NSF and the building industry. At Public Works Canada, he codeveloped the Total Building Performance Evaluation method. Since 1988, Dr. Hartkopf has directed the Advanced Building Systems Integration Consortium (ABSIC), an industry-university-government partnership dedicated to improving the quality of the workplace. In 1990, he initiated, conceptualized, and raised the funds on a global basis for the Robert L. Preger Intelligent Workplace, a $4-million living and lived-in laboratory and demonstration facility. This project features unprecedented systems concepts for user satisfaction and productivity, organizational flexibility, technological adaptability, and energy and environmental effectiveness. He has contributed to over 100 technical publications. Dr. Hartkopf holds a Diplom-Ingenieur, Architect, from the Technical

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University of Stuttgart, an M. Arch. from the University of Texas, and a Ph.D. from the University of Stuttgart. Jeff S. Lee, ASLA, is the founding principal of Lee & Associates, Inc. of Washington, DC. He has long been involved in site security issues starting in 1984, when he designed U.S. embassies utilizing the “Post Beirut Bombing Site Security Requirements” for the U.S. State Department. Since that time, he has designed numerous diplomatic facilities and many site-sensitive projects in the Washington region, including the Ronald Reagan Building at the Federal Triangle and the Remote Delivery Facility and Metro Entrance Facility, both at the Pentagon. He is presently working on incorporating perimeter security measures for the Thomas Jefferson Memorial. Mr. Lee participated in the expert panel addressing “Designing Security in the Nation’s Capital” at the National Park Service’s January 2002 conference “Our Public Safety and Historic Places.” He has served as the President of the Potomac Chapter, American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), and represents the Committee of 100 as a member of the National Capital Park and Planning Commission’s National Capital Urban Design and Security Task Force. Jane C. Loeffler is Visiting Associate Professor, University Honors, at the University of Maryland. She is the author of The Architecture of Diplomacy: Building America’s Embassies, and has lectured widely and published numerous articles, including opinion pieces in the New York Times and the Washington Post (“Diplomacy Doesn’t Belong in Bunkers”) on the history of U.S. foreign buildings and the widening role that security has played in that story. For her contributions to international affairs, the U.S. Department of State awarded her its Distinguished Public Service Award in 1998. Professor Loeffler is a graduate of Wellesley College, where she was awarded the Plogsterth Prize in Art History, and holds a master’s in city planning from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design and a doctorate in American civilization from George Washington University. As consultant to the National Gallery of Art, she authored Frederick Law Olmsted/USA for the Gallery’s first major exhibition on landscape architecture in 1973. She later served as curator at the National Building Museum, where she initiated her study of embassy architecture. Since 1993 she has been literary executor of the papers of Frederick Gutheim, the noted Washington planner and preservationist with whom she was associated for many years. Her profiles of Gutheim appeared in Preservation and Washington History. Robert Smilowitz is a principal with Weidlinger Associates of New York. He has 24 years of experience in mathematical modeling and dynamic response calculations for ship, satellite, and hardened and conventional structures subjected to shock and vibration loading. Dr. Smilowitz has considerable expertise in blast-resistant design of structures and the vulnerability analysis of structures to vehicle-bomb attack. He has participated in the design of numerous federal courthouses and office buildings, embassy structures, airline terminals, and commercial structures. Dr. Smilowitz is a registered engineer in New York and California and has published extensively on blast-resistant and seismic design issues. He holds a BSCE from the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art and an M.S. and Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Lawrence J. Vale is Department Head and Professor of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include design politics, public housing, and qualitative methods. Other research examines the architectural and urbanistic

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expression of institutional power, and the growth of design and marketing efforts aimed at “imaging” places. Dr. Vale is the author of several books and numerous articles including Architecture, Power, and National Identity, Mediated Monuments and National Identity, and From Façade to Interface: Representing Institutional Power in Cyberspace (forthcoming). Dr. Vale has received many awards including Best Book in Urban Affairs (2002), the Place Research Award (2000), and the Margaret MacVicar Faculty Fellowship for excellence in teaching (1999-2000). Dr. Vale holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Oxford University. Dianne Walters is a graduate of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and a registered architect. She has extensive experience in planning, design and construction, facilities management, and procurement. During her career with the General Services Administration (GSA) she served as Program Executive of the Courthouse Management Group, Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Procurement, Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Design and Construction, and Director of Facilities Management and Support. Since leaving GSA, Ms. Walters has provided her expertise to organizations including the Administrative Office of the Courts and the College of Architecture at Georgia Institute of Technology. Craig Zimring is professor of architecture and of psychology at Georgia Institute of Technology. He has developed methods, procedures, and concepts, including computer tools, for the analysis and evaluation of building issues such as wayfinding, security, and stress. He has particularly focused on how social, organizational, and behavioral information can be incorporated into design and decision making at a variety of scales and building types such as healthcare facilities, jails and prisons, courthouses, and embassies. He has served as consultant and directed research projects for a number of corporations and government agencies and served on the board of several professional organizations including the Environmental Design Research Association and the Justice Facilities Research Program. Dr. Zimring holds a B.S. from the University of Michigan and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is a member of the NRC Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment.