Click for next page ( 108


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 107
Appendixes

OCR for page 107
108 MATERIALS COUNT implementation of material flows accounting conclusions, adversity, suspicion, fear, and resistance. The committee believes that a broad range of proactive partnerships is necessary to ensure successful development, implementation, and effective use of material flows accounts. However, significant impediments to building effective partnerships will have to be overcome, as cliscussed in detail in Chapter 6. The ongoing work of the U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Economic Analysis provide robust partnership-based models for data collection and analysis. IDENTIFYING AND SELECTING AN ADVISORY COMMITTEE A multidisciplinary advisory committee of expert parkers should initially specify data needs for targeted materials reflective of cost- benefit trade-offs, including integration, structuring accounts to address these needs, and developing a protocol for creation, prioritization, and population of accounts. Abler the initial work has been accomplished, the advisory committee would then guide successive steps aimed at achieving maturity of the system; coordinate the data input to the system by various stakeholders; and coordinate the research agenda to improve the system of accounts and linkages to other databases. COLLABORATIVE PROTOCOL NECESSARY Successful use of material flows accounts for sound public policy making hinges on cooperation among government, business, and the public. Regardless of the form of the organization, an important task is to establish the databases through the efforts of various stakeholders based on criteria and a protocol to ensure that those criteria are satisfied. Elements of such a protocol include data quality, transparency, and formatting to ensure access. PRE-PUBLICATION VERSION, SUBJECT TO EDITORIAL CHANGES

OCR for page 107
Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members R. LARRY GRAYSON, chair, is the Union Pacific/Rocky Mountain Energy Professor of Mining Engineering and chair of the Department of Mining Engineering, School of Mines and Metallurgy at the University of Missouri-Rolla. He was formerly dean of the College of Mineral and En- ergy Resources at West Virginia University and chair of the West Virginia State Mine Inspectors' Examining Board (1991-1995~. As the Bureau of Mines health and safety research functions were merged, he served as the first permanent associate director for the Office for Mine Safety and Health Research of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control (1997-2000~. His research interests lie in min- ing health and safety, coal mining and coal bed methane, and other issues related to mine management and operations. His industry background is in coal mining in Pennsylvania, where he began his career as a mine la- borer and surveyor, working his way through various engineering and operations positions, including mine superintendent. He is a registered professional engineer in Missouri and Pennsylvania, and a certified mine examiner and mine foreman in Pennsylvania. Dr. Grayson has served on the Board of Directors (1999-2002) of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME), is a member of the International Society of Mine Safety Professionals, and has been chair of numerous committees and pro- grams for SME. DAVID T. ALLEN is the Gertz Regents Professor of Chemical Engi- neering and the director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Re- sources at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests lie in environmental reaction engineering, particularly issues related to air qual- 109

OCR for page 107
110 APPENDIX A ity and pollution prevention. He is the author of four books and more than 125 papers in these areas. The quality of his research has been recog- nized by the National Science Foundation through the Presidential Young Investigator Award, the AT&T Foundation through an Industrial Ecology Fellowship, and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers through the Cecil Award for contributions to environmental engineering. Dr. Allen was a lead investigator in the Texas air quality study, and his current research is focused on using the results from that study to provide a scien- tific basis for air quality management in Texas. His educational efforts have been focused on developing materials on environmentally conscious design for engineering curricula and his most recent effort is a textbook on design of chemical processes and products, developed jointly with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. BRADEN ALLENBY is the environment, health, and safety Vice President for AT&T, a Batten Fellow in Residence at the University of Virginia's Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, and an adjunct professor at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, Princeton Theological Seminary, and at the University of Virginia's School of Engineering. He was a telecommunications regula- tory attorney at AT&T beginning in 1983 and became senior environmen- tal attorney for AT&T (1984-1993~. During 1992, he was the I. Herbert Holloman Fellow at the National Academy of Engineering. Currently, Dr. Allenby is a member of the Environmental Law Institute Board of Direc- tors, a Resources for the Future council member, and a member of the Advisory Committee of the United Nations Environment Programme Working Group on Product Design for Sustainability. He has taught courses on industrial ecology, design for environment, and earth systems engineering and management at Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Columbia University, Princeton Theological Semi- nary, and the University of the Virginia School of Engineering. Dr. Allenby is a fellow of the Royal Society for the Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce. CORBY G. ANDERSON is the director at the Center for Advanced Mineral and Metallurgical Processing with 23 years of experience in chemical engineering, metallurgical engineering, engineering services, and plant operations. He is qualified in pyrometallurgy and mineral pro- cessing and also has industrial experience in hydrometallurgy. Dr. Ander- son has been responsible for lab work, pilot plant work, research, process development, engineering design, startup, operations, management, and environmental affairs for hydrometallurgical plants producing silver, gold, antimony, nickel, cobalt, and copper. He has authored or coauthored approximately 90 papers and presentations on process technologies and holds several international patents. He is active in many professional or- ganizations including participation as director of the Society of Manu-

OCR for page 107
APPENDIX A 111 factoring Engineers, and director of the International Precious Metals In- stitute, and as a trustee for the Northwest Mining Association. In 1996 he was awarded the Extraction and Processing Technology Award from the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society. Dr. Anderson has served as a committee member and speaker for various National Research Council committees. SCOTT R. BAKER is director of the Environment Program at the In- ternational Copper Association. Dr. Baker is a toxicologist with broad technical expertise in human health and the environment, including more than 20 years of experience directing and participating in a wide variety of scientific evaluations involving toxicology, health risk assessment, and scientific interpretation of regulatory affairs and risk management issues. Prior to his current position, he was a consulting toxicologist with Versar, Inc., and EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, after serving as sci- ence advisor to the assistant administrator for research and development at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Prior to his appoint- ment with the EPA, Dr. Baker was a senior staff officer at the National Research Council. His project experience includes scientific evaluations of the effect of chemicals on human health and the environment; assessment of the impacts of legislative initiatives, regulations, and standards; envi- ronmental toxicology investigations; and risk assessments. He has related experience in emergency preparedness, indoor air research, pesticide health effects, air tonics, and water quality criteria. Dr. Baker also has chaired and served on a number of committees and task forces related to risk assessment and environmental issues, such as chemical safety and the human health effects of chemicals. DAVID BERRY is currently a consultant and facilitator. He initiated the Interagency Group on Sustainable Development Indicators and the Interagency Group on Industrial Ecology, both federal responses to the President's Council on Sustainable Development. The groups raise aware- ness of environmental, social, and economic trends; support collaboration among federal agencies; and encourage action toward sustainability. Mr. Berry was an economist in the Canadian government (Resources Canada), and a principal in a corporation using computer controls in energy man- agement of large facilities, and ran a company in Korea trading in a wide range of materials and manufactured goods. He joined the U.S. Depart- ment of the Interior in 1991 and resigned in August 2001. Mr. Berry is on the advisory board to the International Sustainability Indicators Network and a participant in the Consulting Group on Sustainable Development Indicators. He was a U.S. delegate to the Organization for Economic De- velopment meeting on sustainable development indicators in Rome in 1999 and led a U.S. team on information for decision making at the meet- ings of the Commission on Sustainable Development Ninth Session

OCR for page 107
2 APPENDIX A United Nations meetings in 2001. He has spoken in many countries on sustainability and appeared on Korean and American television and pub- lic radio. ROBERT COSTANZA is Gund Professor of Ecological Economics and director of the Gund Institute of Ecological Economics at the School of Natural Resources at the University of Vermont. He was professor and director of the University of Maryland Institute for Ecological Economics, Center for Environmental Science at Solomon's and College Park, Mary- land, for more than 10 years. He also was a professor in the Department of Biology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Costanza's research interests and areas of expertise include systems ecology, ecological economics, environmental policy, landscape ecology, ecological model- ing, energy analysis, social traps, incentive structures, and institutions. He has co-authored or authored more than 100 journal articles and 17 books. Dr. Costanza is co-founder and past vice president and president of the International Society for Ecosystem Health. He is also an active member of the Ecological Society of America, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Society for Ecologi- cal Modeling. His accomplishments have been recognized through sev- eral awards and honors, including a Pew Scholarship (1993-1996) and a Kellogg National Fellowship (1982-1985~. THOMAS E. GRAEDEL is a professor of industrial ecology, of chemi- cal engineering, and of geophysics at Yale University's School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. For more than 30 years he has studied both chemical kinetic modeling of gases and droplets in Earth's atmosphere and corrosion of materials by atmospheric species. Dr. Graedel's current interest is focused on industrial ecology, especially the flows of materials through the technological society and their potential environmental im- plications. He has authored 11 books and more than 250 technical papers. Dr. Graedel is a member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee on Environmental Research and Education, and chair of the International Society for Industrial Ecology Awards Committee. He has received several honors and awards in recognition of his accomplish- ments, including American Association for the Advancement of Science and American Geophysical Union fellowships and election to the National Academy of Engineering. lOYCE SEE-YIN LEE is the chief architect at the New York City Of- fice of Management and Budget (OMB). In the City Chartered Asset Man- agement Program, she oversees the effort of consultants and in-house staff in the survey of major public buildings, including libraries, schools, court- houses, police precincts, firehouses, hospitals, health centers, museums, and cultural facilities. She supervises the production of citywide reports identifying state of good repair needs on behalf of the Mayor. In her ca-

OCR for page 107
pacify at OMB, Ms. Lee also oversees resource-efficient design and con- struction citywide. She conducts energy and resource efficiency reviews of capital projects and raises the awareness of sustainable design and con- struction practices within the public sector. She works with construction and operating agencies, the mayor's offices, state authorities, and a uni- versity consortium to broaden educational opportunities as well as to ad- dress financial issues in sustainable development. In 1998, she founded the Committee on the Environment at the American Institute of Archi- tects New York Chapter. She is now national chair of the AIA Committee on the Environment WAYNE B. TRUSTY is president of the ATHENATM. Sustainable Materials Institute, having served as project manager of the predecessor ATHENATM Project (1991-1997~. In addition, Mr. Trusty is also a private consultant, having started his own consulting practice in 1972 after gain- ing experience with such organizations as Acres Consulting Services and Stanford Research Institute. He has worked with private industry and government on a range of assignments that cover a wide spectrum of sub- jects including the environment, forest industry economics and forest policy, water resources, transportation, energy policy and markets, and regional development. He has also served as economic adviser on several large projects, including the Canadian Arctic Gas Pipeline project, and has appeared as an expert witness before regulatory bodies in Canada and the United States. He is a member of several organizations, including the Technical Committee of the U.S. Consortium for Research on Renew- able Industrial Materials, the U.S. Green Building Council, Society of En- vironmental Toxicology and Chemistry, and Construction Industry Board. He is a past chairman of an International Union of Laboratories and Ex- perts in Construction Materials, Systems and Structures (RILEM) techni- cal committee examining the use of Life Cycle Assessment with regard to building materials and products. DIRK J.A. VAN ZYL is professor of mining engineering and director of the Mining Life-Cycle Center at the Mackay School of Mines at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is also a geotechnical and environmental mining consultant. In this role, he provides consulting services to the min- ing industry with emphasis on mine waste management and heap leach facility design and mine closure. During his professional career, he has held the positions of engineer, professor, vice president, and president. He has authored or coauthored more than 60 papers. Dr. Van Zyl's work has been recognized through the J.E. Jennings Award from the South Af- rican Institute of Civil Engineers, as well as through multiple awards from the Society for Mining Metallurgy and Exploration, Inc. He is an active member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Society for Min-

OCR for page 107
4 APPENDIX A ing, Metallurgy, and Exploration, and a registered professional engineer in 11 states. NRC STAFF TAMARA L. DICKINSON, study director, is a senior program officer with the National Research Council's Board on Earth Sciences and Re- sources, responsible for managing the earth resources activities of the Board. Dr. Dickinson was awarded the National Academies individual distinguished service award in 2002. She has served as program director for the Petrology and Geochemistry Program in the Division of Earth Sci- ences at the National Science Foundation. She has also served as disci- pline scientist for the Planetary Materials and Geochemistry Program at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters. As a postdoctoral fellow at the NASA Johnson Space Center, she con- ducted experiments on the origin and evolution of lunar rocks and highly reduced igneous meteorites. She holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in geology from the University of New Mexico and a B.A. in geology from the Uni- versity of Northern Iowa. KAREN L. IMHOF is a senior project assistant for the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources of the National Research Council. She previously worked on the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Before com- ing to the Academies, she worked as a staff and administrative assistant in diverse organizations, including the National Wildlife Federation, the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, and the Three Mile Is- land nuclear facility. MONICA R. LIPSCOMB is a research assistant for the National Academies Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. She has completed her coursework for a master of urban and regional planning degree at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, with a concentration in environmental plan- ning. Previously, she served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Cole d'Ivoire and has worked as a biologist at the National Cancer Institute. She holds a B.S. in environmental and forest biology from the State University of New York, Syracuse.