Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Attendees

WORKSHOP STEERING COMMITTEE

RICHARD A. McCRAY (Chair) received a B.S. in physics from Stanford University in 1959 and a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1967. He was a high school physics teacher from 1960–1962. McCray was a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology (1967–1968) and an assistant professor at the Harvard College Observatory (1968–1971). In 1971, he moved to the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he is now George Gamow Distinguished Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences. He has held visiting positions at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (1983), Beijing University and Nanjing University (1987), the Space Telescope Science Institute (1988), Columbia University (1990), and the University of California at Berkeley (1997). In 1983 McCray was awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, and in 1990 he received the Dannie S. Heinemann Prize for Astrophysics of the American Physical Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1989. In 1996 he was appointed Concurrent Professor of Astronomy at Nanjing University and in 2002 he was awarded the National Science Foundation (NSF) Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholar.

BONNIE J. BRUNKHORST is past chair of the National Council of Scientific Society Presidents and past president of the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). Brunkhorst is a professor at California State University, San Bernardino, with a joint appointment in the College of Natural Sciences in geological sciences and in the College



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Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Workshop Attendees WORKSHOP STEERING COMMITTEE RICHARD A. McCRAY (Chair) received a B.S. in physics from Stanford University in 1959 and a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1967. He was a high school physics teacher from 1960–1962. McCray was a postdoctoral fellow at the California Institute of Technology (1967–1968) and an assistant professor at the Harvard College Observatory (1968–1971). In 1971, he moved to the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he is now George Gamow Distinguished Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences. He has held visiting positions at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (1983), Beijing University and Nanjing University (1987), the Space Telescope Science Institute (1988), Columbia University (1990), and the University of California at Berkeley (1997). In 1983 McCray was awarded a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, and in 1990 he received the Dannie S. Heinemann Prize for Astrophysics of the American Physical Society. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1989. In 1996 he was appointed Concurrent Professor of Astronomy at Nanjing University and in 2002 he was awarded the National Science Foundation (NSF) Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholar. BONNIE J. BRUNKHORST is past chair of the National Council of Scientific Society Presidents and past president of the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA). Brunkhorst is a professor at California State University, San Bernardino, with a joint appointment in the College of Natural Sciences in geological sciences and in the College

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of Education in science, mathematics, and technology education. She is associate director of the University Institute for Science Education. She also taught secondary science for 15 years and supervised the K–8 science program in the Lexington, Massachusetts, public schools before receiving her Ph.D. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in geology from Boston University, and her Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in science education with geology. She served as a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment and on the Standards Executive Editorial Committee for the NAS. She also served as the coordinator and was cofounder for the national Salish Consortium for the Improvement of Science Teacher Preparation Through Research. Brunkhorst was awarded the 2002 NSTA Distinguished Service Award and received the NAS honorary appointment as national associate, first class. SARAH C.R. ELGIN is professor of biology in the Department of Biology, Washington University, and holds joint appointments in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, and the Department of Education. She received her B.A. in chemistry in 1967 at Pomona College and her Ph.D. in 1971 in biochemistry with James Bonner at the California Institute of Technology, where she also did postdoctoral studies with Lee Hood from 1971–1973. Her many honors and fellowships include Distinguished Faculty Award, Washington University, 1993; Overseas Fellow, Churchill College, Cambridge University, 1995–1996; Fellows Award, Academy of Science of St. Louis, 2000; and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Professor, 2002. Elgin directs Washington University’s HHMI Undergraduate Biological Sciences Education Program, supporting undergraduate research opportunities and the development of investigative activities in the undergraduate curriculum. She works in precollege education through a curriculum development project, initially funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health Science Education Partnership Award program (NIH/ SEPA), which has produced a high school unit, Modern Genetics for All Students. She also participates in a course for K–8 teachers, Edu 6002 “Life Cycles and Heredity.” Her goal is “not necessarily to produce a generation of scientists, but to produce citizens who are comfortable with science.” RONALD J. HENRY has been provost and vice president for academic affairs at Georgia State University since July 1994. One of his responsibilities is to

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develop Georgia State into a premier urban research university. Another responsibility is leadership to promote and recommend changes in public education systems that will improve success of Georgia students at all levels, preschool through postsecondary (P–16) and into the world of work. Previously, he served as chief academic officer for Miami University (Ohio) and Auburn University. Henry serves as chair of the Metro Atlantic P–16 Council. He is the principal investigator of a project cosponsored by the National Association of System Heads and the Education Trust to develop learning outcomes and standards for undergraduate education in several disciplines, including the natural sciences. In addition, he is the principal investigator on a Standards-based Teacher Education Project. Henry has just completed one term on NRC’s Committee on Undergraduate Science Education (CUSE) and has been reappointed for a second term. He received his B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics from Queen’s University, Belfast, in 1961 and 1964, respectively. He has been a fellow of the American Physical Society since 1974. JOHN R. JUNGCK is Mead Chair of the Sciences and professor of biology at Beloit College. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Jungck is principal investigator and cofounder of the BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium. Over the past sixteen years, he and his colleagues at other institutions have been leading the effort to build The BioQUEST Library, a collection of computer-based tools, simulations, databases, and textual materials that support collaborative, open-ended investigations in biology. Developed at campuses around the country, each module in the library simulates or models a different biological system, allowing students to analyze massive amounts of data and visualize the relationships among variables. Each module must involve students actively in learning, go through an intensive peer review process, and be proven effective in the classroom. Jungck is chair of the Education Committee of the Society for Mathematical Biology, the developer of numerous software packages in biology, coeditor of Microbes Count!: Problem Posing, Problem Solving, and Persuading Peers in Microbiology, and principal investigator of an NSF national dissemination project, “BEDROCK: Bioinformatics Education Dissemination: Reaching Out, Connecting, and Knitting-together.” ALAN C. KAY is currently president of Viewpoints Research Institute, Inc. He is best known for the idea of personal

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computing, the concept of the intimate laptop computer, and the inventions of the now ubiquitous overlapping-window interface and modern object-oriented programming. He is one of the inventors of the Smalltalk programming language and the architect of the modern windowing graphic user interface (GUI). He is especially interested in education and hopes that this new technology will help children to grow up thinking qualitatively better than most adults do today. Kay earned a B.S. in mathematics and molecular biology, University of Colorado, 1966; his M.S. in electrical engineering, University of Utah; and a Ph.D. in computer science, University of Utah, 1969. While at Utah he also contributed to the design of the ARPAnet (now known as the Internet). He became a researcher in the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in 1969, and was one of the founders of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in 1970. After Xerox he was chief scientist at Atari, and from 1984 to 1996 was a fellow at Apple Computer, during which time he also taught children to use computers at the Open School in West Hollywood, California. In 1996, he joined Walt Disney Imagineering as a Disney Fellow and vice president for research and development. ISHRAT M. KHAN is a professor of chemistry at Clark Atlanta University. He is connected with the NSF-sponsored Peer-Led Team Learning (Workshop Chemistry) projects. At Clark Atlanta, the chemistry department adopted and adapted Workshop Chemistry with substantial success. Khan has been recognized for his promise as a college-level science educator by being selected as one of Project Kaleidoscope’s (PKAL) Faculty for the 21st Century. In this capacity he also served as assistant dean of the 2001 PKAL Summer Institute on Improving Undergraduate Science Education. He has co-organized three symposia at American Chemical Society (ACS) national meetings, including a 1999 international symposium on “Innovations in Polymer Science Teaching.” In the summer of 2002, he coconvened a seminar entitled “New Chemistry” through the Faculty Resource Network at New York University. The seminar’s goal was to encourage the introduction of frontier research areas into the undergraduate curriculum. Khan’s research interests and publications are in the fields of synthetic biomacromolecules and biofunctional macromolecules with application in the general area of biomaterials (e.g., tissue engineering, drug-delivery). He has edited two ACS Symposium Series books and has over 50 refereed publications. Khan received his B.A. in chemistry in 1979 from Susquehanna Univer-

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sity, and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Florida in 1984. RAMON E. LOPEZ is the C. Sharp Cook Distinguished Professor in the Department of Physics, University of Texas, El Paso. He received his B.S. in physics in 1980 from the University of Illinois, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in space physics in 1982 and 1986, respectively, from Rice University. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), and the recipient of the 2002 APS Nicholson Medal for Humanitarian Service to Science. Lopez is active in science education reform at a variety of levels. He has served as an education consultant for a number of school districts and state agencies around the country. LILLIAN C. McDERMOTT is a professor of physics and director of the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington. She received her B.A. from Vassar College and a Ph.D. in experimental nuclear physics from Columbia University in 1959. She is a fellow of the AAAS and the APS. Among her most significant awards are the 2001 Oersted Medal of the American Association of Physics Teachers (the highest award of the AAPT), the 2000 Education Research Award of the Council of Scientific Society Presidents, and the 1990 Millikan Lecture Award of the AAPT. For more than two decades, McDermott has worked to establish research on the learning and teaching of physics as a field for scholarly inquiry by physicists. Under her leadership, the Physics Education Group conducts a coordinated program of research, curriculum development, and instruction. The group is deeply involved in the teaching of undergraduate physics and in the preparation of K–12 teachers. Graduate students in the group may earn the Ph.D. in physics by doing research in physics education. In addition, the group is actively engaged in faculty development through teaching assistant preparation seminars and professional development workshops for college and university faculty. ROBERT F. OLIN is dean of the University of Alabama’s (UA) College of Arts and Sciences. He joined the college in 2000 after serving 25 years on the faculty of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He is the recipient of the 2002 Virginia B. Smith Innovative Leadership Award given by the Council for Adult and Experiential Leaning and the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. Under his leadership, UA’s College of Arts and Sciences opened the Mathematics Technology Learning Center, a 240-computer math learning community located in UA’s largest residence hall. In

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2001, the center received a Special Award of Merit from the Alabama Quality Council. A strong proponent of the value of learning communities, Olin has also led in the development of undergraduate residential learning communities at UA, including the Parker-Adams Freshmen Year Program. The center is based on an innovative program developed by Olin when he served as chairman of Virginia Tech’s Department of Mathematics. The department of mathematics at Virginia Tech was named Exemplary Department in Virginia Tech’s College of Arts and Sciences and a University Exemplary Department. The department established two endowed faculty chairs, expanded its graduate program, and increased access to mathematics courses for Virginia’s secondary teachers through online instruction. Olin received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics in 1970 from Ottawa University in Kansas and a doctorate in mathematics in 1975 from Indiana University, Bloomington. JAMES W. SERUM is the founder and president of SciTek Ventures, a consulting company that helps young companies deal with the challenges of bringing science, technology, and business planning together in a focused, cohesive manner. Serum is also a venture partner at Flagship Ventures. He is on the boards of directors of Nanostream, Genstruct, and engeneOS. He was the cofounder, director, executive vice president, and chief operating officer for Viaken Systems, Inc. Previously he worked at the Hewlett Packard Company for 26 years where he held a variety of positions in research and development, marketing, and general management. Serum was the founder of Hewlett Packard’s Bioscience Products business and served as chairman of the company’s Pharmaceutical Business Bioscience Council and cochairman of the Corporate R&D Council. He received a B.A. in chemistry from Hope College and was awarded a Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 1969 from the University of Colorado. His doctorate research was directed toward studies in mass spectrometry. Following his graduate studies, he taught and did research at the University of Ghent, Belgium. SUSAN R. SINGER is currently professor of biology at Carleton College, with which she has been associated since 1986. She received her B.S. summa cum laude in 1981, her M.S. in 1982, and her Ph.D. in 1985, all from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). She was chair of Carleton’s Department of Biology from 1995–1998 and served as program officer for developmental mechanisms at the NSF from 1999 to

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2000. She also chaired the Education Committee of the American Society of Plant Biologists and has been involved in numerous other educational efforts at the national level. Her teaching interests include Carleton’s Triad Program, which is an integrated first-term experience that brings a group of students together to explore a thematic question across disciplinary boundaries by enrolling in three thematically linked courses. Singer also directs the Perlman Center for Learning and Teaching at Carleton. The Perlman Center sponsors conversations, encourages reflection, and offers a venue for classroom innovations that bear on the challenges and opportunities of education at a distinctive liberal arts college. The goal of the center is to join student insights with faculty perspectives in an ongoing discussion about both the reliable and the elusive elements that foster and constrain learning. CARL E. WIEMAN is Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of Colorado and winner of the 2001 Nobel Prize in physics for studies of the Bose-Einstein Condensate. He has been a member of the NAS since 1995. Since 2000, Wieman has worked on the National Task Force for Undergraduate Physics, which emphasizes improving undergraduate physics programs as a whole: introductory and advanced courses for all students, preparation of K–12 teachers, undergraduate research opportunities, and the recruitment and mentoring of students for diverse careers. He is a 2001 recipient of an NSF Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars. Wieman received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1977. NATIONAL ACADEMIES STAFF Bruce Alberts is president of the NAS and chair of the NRC, the principal operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. He is a respected biochemist recognized for his work in both biochemistry and molecular biology and is known particularly for his extensive molecular analyses of the protein complexes that allow chromosomes to be replicated. Alberts joined the faculty of Princeton University in 1966 and after 10 years moved to the medical school of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). In 1980, he was awarded an American Cancer Society lifetime research professorship. In 1985, he was named chair of the UCSF department of biochemistry and biophysics. Alberts is one of the principal authors of The Molecular Biology of the Cell, now in its third edition, considered the leading ad-

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vanced textbook in this field and used widely in U.S. colleges and universities. His most recent text, Essential Cell Biology, is intended to present this subject matter to a wider audience. He is committed to the improvement of science education; he helped to create City Science, a program for improving science teaching in San Francisco elementary schools. Robert L. DeHaan is the director of CUSE in the NRC’s Center for Education. DeHaan came to CUSE in January, 2002, from Emory University, where he was the Charles H. Candler Professor of Cell Biology, Emory Medical School, and adjunct professor in the Division of Educational Studies. DeHaan received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1956. In 1995, DeHaan created a precollege science education outreach effort called the Elementary Science Education Partners (ESEP) program. DeHaan’s work in the schools with ESEP has been cited by the National Academy of Sciences Resources for Involving Scientists in Education (RISE) program as an exemplary professional development project and by the National Science Resources Center as a Center of Excellence. In addition, in 1998 he received the First Bruce Alberts Award from the American Society of Cell Biologists for Distinguished Contributions to Science Education. He received the Thomas Jefferson Award from Emory as a “Lifetime Leader in Scholarship and Teaching.” He holds an appointment as lifetime fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is winner of the 1993 Gregor Mendel Medal from the University of Brno, Czech Republic, for his research in cell biology and development. DeHaan founded and was the first director of the Emory Center for Ethics in Public Policy and the Professions and remains a faculty scholar at the Center. WORSKHOP PRESENTERS Barbara Baumstark received her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Since 1984, she has been a faculty member at Georgia State University (GSU), where she is currently professor in the Department of Biology. Baumstark served as graduate director for the Biology Department for 12 years before becoming its director of instructional programs in 2001. Her educational services include participation in the Quality in Undergraduate Education (QUE) Standards Project, the Standards-based Teacher Education Project (STEP) Science Committee, the Performance Assessment of Colleges and Technical Schools (PACTS) Science Subcommittee, and

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the Advisory Board of BioTrek, a division of SciTrek of Atlanta. In 1999, Baumstark initiated the Bio-Bus Project, an outreach program that uses a 30-foot mobile instructional laboratory to bring exciting science activities to Georgia’s schoolchildren. She has also been the principal investigator for a Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) award through the U.S. Department of Education and currently directs a state-funded project designed for the recruitment and retention of minorities in the biological sciences. Baumstark has been the recipient of GSU’s College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Junior Faculty Award and, in 2001, received the university’s Instructional Innovation Award. David F. Brakke is a limnologist who has published extensively on a range of topics related to surface water chemistry and watershed biogeochemistry, as well as applied problems in ecosystem, watershed, and lake management. He has served as associate editor for the leading journal Limnology and Oceanography and currently writes a column on science and society for the Association of Women in Science Magazine. For several years Brakke has been involved in a number of major national projects and initiatives related to science, mathematics, and technology education, undergraduate research, teacher preparation, and ongoing professional and leadership development of K–12 teachers and college faculty. He is currently dean of science and mathematics at James Madison University, where he is continuing work to improve science and mathematics education for all students across the country. Paula R.L. Heron is an assistant professor of physics at the University of Washington. She received a B.Sc. in physics from the University of Ottawa and a Ph.D. in theoretical condensed matter physics from the University of Western Ontario in 1995. She joined the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington in 1995. With Lillian C. McDermott, she was awarded the 2000 Archie Mahan Prize of the Optical Society of America for the best article in Optics and Photonics News. Heron is currently a member of the APS Forum on Education Executive Committee, the AAPT Committee for Women in Physics, and the AAPT Committee on Teacher Preparation. She consults on several NSF–funded education projects. Heron is engaged in an ongoing investigation of difficulties that students encounter in applying concepts from introductory physics in their subsequent studies. This research takes place in courses on thermal physics that are beyond the introductory level and in courses on mechanics that are taught

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from an engineering perspective. Findings from this research are guiding the development and modification of curriculum for introductory and advanced physics courses, including courses for precollege teachers. Anton Lawson is currently in the Department of Biology at Arizona State University. He received his B.S. in biology from the University of Arizona in 1967, his M.S. in biology from the University of Oregon in 1969, and his Ph.D. in science education from the University of Oklahoma in 1973. Lawson’s research centers on the nature and development of scientific thinking patterns, such as hypothetico-deductive, probabilistic, proportional, combinatorial, analogical, and correlational reasoning. Major interests involve determination of factors that influence the development of these thinking patterns during childhood and adolescence and determination of their relationship to each other and to scientific concept acquisition. The goal is to generate and test explanatory theories of the development of thinking patterns and develop neurological models of cognition. Classroom implications are sought with the intent of improving science instruction. Lawson received the Outstanding Science Educator of the Year (1981) award from the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science. He also received the award for Distinguished Contributions to Science Education Research (1986) from the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) and was honored with the Journal of Research in Science Teaching award for outstanding research paper in 1976, 1985, and 1987 by the NARST. Herb Levitan is currently serving as section head for the Division of Undergraduate Education, Directorate for Education and Human Resources, at the NSF. His responsibilities include administrative association with the Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program and the NSF Director’s Award for Distinguished Teaching Scholars (DTS) and contributions to the review of life sciences and interdisciplinary proposals. Levitan has been a permanent NSF employee in the Division of Undergraduate Education since 1993. He came to the NSF as a visiting scientist in 1990 after serving as a faculty member in the Zoology Department at the University of Maryland, College Park, for more than 20 years. At the University of Maryland, he taught graduate and undergraduate courses in neurophysiology, electrophysiology, pharmacology, and cell biology and directed the department’s honors program. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Cornell

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University. His postdoctoral research in neurobiology was conducted at the Brain Research Institute of the University of California, Los Angeles; the Centre d’Etude de Physiologie Nerveuse in Paris; and the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda. He also served as senior staff associate at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Susan B. Millar is a senior scientist with the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER). A cultural anthropologist by training (Cornell, Ph.D., 1981), her work during the last fifteen years has focused on organizational change processes and student and faculty learning associated with efforts to improve education in the science and engineering disciplines. At this time, she pursues these topics as an evaluator for two major NSF-funded projects being launched at WCER in 2003—the Systemwide Change for All Learners and Educators and the Center for the Integration of Research on Teaching and Learning—and as the lead evaluator for the Regional Workshop Program, a nationwide science faculty development project. Millar is also the external evaluator for the Center for the Advancement of Engineering Education at the University of Washington. In addition, as codirector of the IceCube Education Resource Center, she is using knowledge gained as an evaluator to help build the education and outreach arm of a major astrophysics experiment. She was founder and director of Learning through Evaluation, Adaptation, and Dissemination (LEAD) Center (1994– 2002). Brian J. Reiser is professor of learning sciences in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. He served as chair of the learning sciences Ph.D. program from 1993, shortly after its inception, until 2001. His research focuses on the design and enactment of supportive environments for student inquiry in science. The goal of this work is to develop a model of “reflective inquiry” and the pedagogical principles for its support. These projects investigate the design of interactive learning environments that scaffold scientific investigation, reflection, and argumentation; design principles for technology-infused curricula that engage students in inquiry projects; and the teaching practice that supports student inquiry. Reiser’s work is part of the initiatives of the NSF Center for Learning Technologies in Urban Schools, which is working to understand how to make learning technologies a pervasive part of science classrooms in urban schools, and the newly funded NSF Center for Curriculum

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Materials in Science. He received his doctorate in cognitive science from Yale University in 1983. Gloria M. Rogers is currently the vice president for institutional research, planning, and assessment at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. In addition to her duties at Rose-Hulman, she has been active presenting seminars on the development and implementation of assessment plans to improve educational programs. Rogers currently serves as a consultant to the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology on the implementation of the new outcomes-based accreditation criteria for engineering and engineering technology and serves as a consultant-evaluator for the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association regional accreditation. She is also a facilitator and presenter for the American Association of Higher Education and the Higher Learning Commission regional institutional workshops, “Changing Institutional Priorities.” In 1998–1999 she was a NSF/American Society of Engineering Education Visiting Scholar, working with engineering programs in the area of assessment. She has organized four national symposia on “Best Assessment Processes.” Rogers has been the cochair of the Rose-Hulman Commission on Assessment of Student Outcomes, which is responsible for the design, development, and implementation of the RosE-Portfolio, an electronic, web-based student portfolio system. Elaine Seymour has served as the director of ethnography and evaluation research at the University of Colorado, Boulder, since 1989. In 2002, she and her group were invited to become part of the university’s new Center to Advance Research and Teaching in the Social Sciences (CARTSS). Important foci for her work have been the study of factors contributing to attrition from undergraduate science, mathematics, and engineering majors and evaluation of national and institution-based initiatives that seek to improve quality and access in undergraduate science. Evaluation work includes two NSF-funded national chemistry consortia. She is currently synthesizing findings from several science education initiatives involved in changing undergraduate science. Seymour has codeveloped online assessment and evaluation tools for faculty engaged in classroom innovation, most notably the Student Assessment of their Learning Gains (SALG) instrument (with S.M. Daffinrud, University of Wisconsin-Madison), and the Field-Tested Learning Assessment Guide (FLAG). Academic and professional honors include the 2000 Betty Vetter Award for Research on Women in

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Engineering from Women in Engineering Programs and Advocates Network (WEPAN), teaching excellence awards, a Fulbright Teaching Scholarship, and doctoral fellowships from the National Institute of Mental Health and the University of Colorado. She received a B.A. Honors in economics and political science from Keele University, England; an M.A. in education from the University of Glasgow, Scotland; and both her M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Jack Wilson is the founding chief executive officer of UMassOnline. He came to UMassOnline from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), where he was the J. Erik Jonsson ’22 Distinguished Professor of Physics, Engineering Science, Information Technology, and Management. While at Rensselaer, he became known for leading a comprehensive restructuring of the academic program that was recognized with the Theodore Hesburgh Award, the Pew Prize, and the Boeing Prize. During his eleven-year career at RPI, he served as dean of undergraduate education, dean of professional and continuing education, interim provost, interim dean of faculty, and as founding director of the Anderson Center for Innovation in Undergraduate Education. He is also known as an entrepreneur and a consultant to many computing and communications firms. He was the founder, first president, and only chairman of LearnLinc Corporation (now Mentergy), a supplier of software systems for corporate learning in Fortune 1000 Corporations. Wilson served as one of sixteen International Consulting Scholars for the IBM Corporation. Wilson is a fellow of the APS and was awarded the Distinguished Service Citation from the AAPT. Robert M. Zemsky served through 2001 as the founding director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Institute for Research on Higher Education, one of this country’s major public policy centers for postsecondary education. Trained as an historian, Zemsky’s early work focused on the nature of political processes in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Since the 1970s his research has centered on how colleges and universities, in a world increasingly dominated by market forces, can be both mission-centered and market-smart. Within the University of Pennsylvania, Zemsky has served as the university’s chief planning officer, and as master of Hill College House. In 1998, Change named him as one of higher education’s top 40 leaders for his role as an agenda setter. He is a former Woodrow Wilson Fellow. He was a postdoctoral Social Science Research Council Fellow in Linguistics and was

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later chair of that council’s Committee on Social Science Personnel. In 1998, he received a Doctor of Humane Letters (Hon.) from Towson University. WORKSHOP FACILITATORS Deborah Allen is an associate professor and undergraduate programs director in the Department of Biological Sciences, University of Delaware. She earned a Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of Delaware and pursued research interests in the area of water and electrolyte homeostasis. A more recent focus has been science education, including the development of a two-semester problems-based-learning (PBL) course in introductory biology. She has been involved in the development of a program for undergraduate PBL peer group facilitators and is currently working with other science educators to design a “science semester” for elementary teacher education majors that will incorporate multidisciplinary PBL problems. She is also working with a statewide committee of teachers and college faculty to design curriculum activities for 10th grade biology in Delaware’s public schools and coteaches the summer professional development courses that support teachers’ use of the activities. She is a founding leader of the Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education and recipient of a 1999 TIAA-CREF Theodore M. Hesburgh Certificate of Excellence for faculty development programs. Katayoun Chamany is on the faculty of the Science, Technology, and Society Program at Eugene Lang College, New School University, an undergraduate science literacy program focused on teaching science in the context of society. A director of this program, she developed an innovative curriculum and established internships and partnerships with other universities to broaden the student experience. Currently, she teaches courses in the program that cover infectious diseases, biotechnology, cell biology, science writing, and genetics. Chamany received the Distinguished University Teaching Award from New School University in 2000. She is dedicated to achieving scientific literacy for all undergraduates and the general public and has developed seminars, workshops, and educational materials that reflect an interactive and case-based method of teaching. Currently, Chamany is researching and developing educational tools to accompany traditional biology textbooks and courses. These tools will incorporate economic, social, and political perspectives with those of the natural sciences in a multimedia format. She received

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her Ph.D. in molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1996 and a B.A. in biology from the University of Iowa in 1989. David K. Gosser, Jr. received a Ph.D. in physical inorganic chemistry at Brown University. He has published in the fields of theoretical and applied electrochemistry and bioelectrochemistry, including an electrochemical study of the antimalarial mechanism of the Chinese natural drug artemisinin and the monograph “Cyclic Voltammetry: Simulation and Analysis of Reaction Mechanisms.” Gosser has led the development of peer-led team learning at the City College of New York since 1991 and has led national projects oriented around peer-led team learning (Workshop Chemistry, 1995–1999; Peer-Led Team Learning: National Dissemination, 1999–2003). His current areas of interest are in the connection between the peer leaders’ experience and interest and success in career choices such as teaching or careers in scientific research. Priscilla Laws currently holds the position of professor of physics at Dickinson College. She received her bachelor’s degree from Reed College in 1961 and a Ph.D. from Bryn Mawr College in theoretical nuclear physics in 1966. Her research interests have included the health effects of medical and dental X-rays, the impact of energy use on the environment, and the uses of experiential approaches and computers to enhance learning in physics. Laws is coordinator of the Workshop Physics project in which interactive teaching methods, direct experience, and the use of computer tools replace traditional lectures. She has extensive experience leading teacher workshops in the United States and abroad and has received awards for software design and curriculum innovation in the sciences from EDUCOM/NCRIPTAL, Computers in Physics, the Sears-Roebuck Foundation, and the Merck Foundation. In 1993, she received the Dana Foundation Award for Pioneering Achievement in Education with Ronald K. Thornton; and in 1996, the AAPT bestowed on her the 1996 Robert A. Millikan Medal for notable and creative contributions to the teaching of physics. Laws and five of her colleagues are currently involved in an NSF Teacher Enhancement project to conduct summer institutes, both at Dickinson College and the University of Oregon, for high school teachers who want to conform to new national and local science education standards. Marshall Sundberg is a plant anatomist/morphologist interested in ontogeny and the role of plant development in ecological and evolutionary adaptation.

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He is also interested in improving science education and has published on curriculum design, assessment, and student-active learning. He received a B.A. from Carleton College (1971), and M.S. (1973) and Ph.D. (1978) degrees from the University of Minnesota and is currently on the faculty of the Department of Biological Sciences, Emporia State University. Sundberg is a recipient of the Charles E. Bessey Award for botanical education from the Botanical Society of America and the Four-Year College Biology Teaching Award from the National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT). Areas of his current research include the evolutionary origin of the maize ear, development of the separation zone in Tabasco pepper fruits, and designing interventions to help students overcome common biological misconceptions. Lillian Tong currently holds the position of faculty associate, professional development programs, at the Center for Biology Education, University of Wisconsin-Madison. She received her Ph.D. at the University of Michigan and did thirteen years of postdoctoral research at UW–Madison in neuroscience of the visual system. She left laboratory research to help establish the Center for Neuroscience at UW-Madison and in 1992 joined the Center for Biology Education to facilitate improvement of undergraduate biology education. Her primary focus is to bring together faculty and staff from departments across campus to share ideas and work collaboratively on science teaching and learning issues. With their input, she identifies impediments to achieving their goals (from administrative to student learning barriers), develops programs, and provides resources to address the needs with a menu of opportunities. Tong has been active in the UW-Madison Teaching Academy, the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Instructional Improvement Committee, and as a partner in Creating a Collaborative Learning Environment, a cross-disciplinary faculty/staff community. Nationally, she has participated in the Coalition for Education in the Life Sciences, PKAL, and Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience. Gordon E. Uno joined the Department of Botany and Microbiology at the University of Oklahoma in 1979, was appointed a David Ross Boyd Professor of Botany in 1997, and is currently serving as the department’s chair. Uno was a program officer in the Division of Undergraduate Education at the NSF in 1998–2000 and serves on the editorial boards of four science and science education journals. He was awarded honorary membership by the NABT in 2001 and was its president in 1995. He

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became a AAAS fellow in 2000, and he has received one national, one state, and three university-level teaching awards. Uno has taught over 6,000 undergraduates and has led many faculty development workshops for university and secondary science instructors.