TABLE A-1 Market Share of Major Lines Serving U.S. Trade (January–August 2002)

Line

Market Share (%)

Maersk-Sealand

13.1

Evergreen

7.1

APL

6.7

Hanjin

6.0

Cosco

5.1

P&O Nedlloyd

4.4

OOCL

4.1

Hyundai

4.0

K-Line

3.8

NYK Line

3.7

MSC

3.7

Yang Ming

3.7

Hapag Lloyd

3.5

MOL

2.5

Source: Journal of Commerce, Dec. 9–15, 2002, pp. 28–34 (from the top 50 lines serving the U.S. trade).

On the other hand, a more significant disruption and greater economic damage to the U.S. freight transportation system could result if a centralized government information management system used by all U.S.-bound carriers, importers, brokers, and so forth were to be targeted [e.g., the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection’s (Customs’) Automated Manifest System (AMS)].1

Another example of a centralized government information management system is the Coast Guard’s National Vessel Movement Center, which receives notices of arrival (NOAs) from all vessels originating from outside the United States 96 hours prior to arrival at the first U.S. port of call. The information in the NOAs is used for U.S. government agencies’ monitoring of vessel movements. Similarly, Customs’ Advanced Passenger Information System (APIS) receives and screens information on persons coming to the United States, and effective later this year it will receive electronic crew manifests from vessels 96 hours prior to arrival in a U.S. port. Both Customs and the Immigration and Naturalization Service use the



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