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D Committee Member Biographical Sketches ROBERT S. LAWRENCE, M.D. (chair), is associate dean for Professional Education Programs, the Edyth Schoenrich Professor of Preventive Medicine, and professor of health policy in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His expertise and research interests include community and social medi- cine, preventive medicine, international health, and the use of evidence-based decision rules to develop policy for clinical preventive services and community health services. Dr. Lawrence is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has previously served the IOM as chair of several committees addressing perti- nent issues in public health, including Exposure of American People to I-131 from Nevada Atomic Bomb Test: Implications for Public Health. Dr. Lawrence is a master of the American College of Physicians, a fellow of the American Col- lege of Preventive Medicine, and holds membership in the American Public Health Association, the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine, and Physicians for Human Rights. DENNIS M. BIER, M.D., is professor of pediatrics, director of the U.S. Depart- ment of Agriculture (USDA) Children' s Nutrition Research Center, and program director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) General Clinical Research Center at the Baylor College of Medicine. He is a member of the IOM and currently serves as associate editor of the Annual Review of Nutrition, president of the NIH General Clinical Research Centers Programs Directors Association, and as member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Nutrition and Electrolytes of The United States Pharmacopeial Convention. Previously, Dr. Bier was professor of pediatrics and internal medicine at Washington University School of Medicine 313

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314 DIOXINS AND DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS IN THE FOOD SUPPLY where he was codirector of the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabo- lism, director of the NIH Mass Spectrometry Resource, and program director of the NIH General Clinical Research Center at St. Louis Children's Hospital. He has been president of the American Society of Clinical Nutrition, editor-in-chief of Pediatric Research, chairman of the USDA Human Studies Review, councilor of the American Pediatric Society, chairman of the NIH Nutrition Study Section, chairman of the NIH General Clinical Research Centers Committee, chairman of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Expert Panel Five-year Plan for Nutrition Research and Training, and chairman of the Kellogg Grain Nutrition Board. He has also served as a member of various other scientific advisory panels, including the HHS/USDA Dietary Guidelines Advisory Com- mittee, the IOM Food and Nutrition Board, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Food and Advisory Committee, the Medical Science Advisory Board of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, the Task Force and Steering Committee of the Pediatric Scientist Development Program, and the Advisory Board of the Na- tional Stable Isotopes Resource at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Bier has authored more than 230 scientific publications and, for his research work, he has received the E. V. Cullum award from the American Institute of Nutrition, the Grace A. Goldsmith award from the American College of Nutrition, and the General Clinical Research Centers award for Excellence in Clinical Research from NIH. ROBERT E. BROYLES retired from Purina Mills, Inc., after 34 years in regu- latory, quality, environmental, and safety activities. In that time, he served as director of the Regulatory, Quality, and Safety Department, director of Regula- tory Affairs, and manager of Regulatory Affairs and Quality Assurance of the Health Industries Division. He currently serves as a consultant to Purina Mills. Mr. Broyles is past chair of the Animal Health Institute's Regulatory Committee, Animal Drug Section, and of the American Feed Industry Association's Feed Control Committee. He is a member of the National Grain and Feed Association's Feed Industry Committee and serves as a faculty member for its Feed Quality Assurance Workshops. Mr. Broyles was awarded the American Feed Industry Association's Member of the Year Award for 1992-1993, and a Distinguished Service Award in 1995 by the Association of American Feed Control Officials for his contributions in regulatory and quality service. DOROTHY R. CALDWELL, M.S., is the coordinator of the North Carolina Initiative for Healthy Weight in Children and Youth in the North Carolina Divi- sion of Public Health. She has extensive experience in public policy and nutri- tion, including food and nutrition assistance programs at local, state, and federal levels, and has been involved in many policy initiatives in national professional associations. Mrs. Caldwell has previously held the post of deputy administrator, Special Nutrition Programs, Food and Nutrition Services, USDA, where she was

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APPENDIX D 315 responsible for child nutrition programs, the Special Supplemental Program for Women, Infants and Children, and commodity distribution programs. DAVID O. CARPENTER, M.D., is a professor of environmental health and toxicology, and the director of the Institute for Health and the Environment, School of Public Health at the State University of New York, Albany. He is principal investigator for a Fogarty International Center training grant in environ- mental and occupational health for fellows from Eastern Europe, Russia, Uzbekistan, and Mongolia. Dr. Carpenter serves on the Board of Directors of Healthy Schools Network, Inc. and is treasurer of the Pacific Basin Consortium for Hazardous Waste, Health, and Environment. He is a member of the New York State Public Health Association and the American Public Health Association; chair of the Board of Directors of Albany-Tula, Inc., an alliance between the capital district of New York and Tula, Russia; and cochair of the Workgroup on Ecosystem Health of the Science Advisory Board of the International Joint Com- mission. Dr. Carpenter is a long-time spokesperson for environmentally related health concerns of the Mohawk tribe of Akwesasne, New York. In 1999, Dr. Carpenter was awarded the Homer N. Calver Award from the American Public Health Association for studies in environmental health. JULIE A. CASWELL, PH.D., is a professor of resource economics and adjunct professor of food science at the University of Massachusetts. Her research inter- ests include the operation of domestic and international food systems, analyzing food system efficiency, and evaluating government policy as it affects systems operation and performance, with particular interest in the economics of food quality, safety, and nutrition. Her edited book publications include Economics of Food Safety, Valuing Food Safety and Nutrition, and Global Food Trade and Consumer Demand for Quality. Dr. Caswell has provided her expertise to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development on food safety issues. From 1989-2002 she chaired Regional Research Project NE-165, an international group of over 100 econo- mists who analyzed the operation and performance of the food system. She has held numerous senior positions with the American Agricultural Economics Asso- ciation and the Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association. KEITH R. COOPER, PH.D., is a professor and dean of research and graduate programs and senior associate director of the New Jersey Agricultural Experi- ment Station, Cook College, Rutgers The State University of New York. Dr. Cooper is also the associate director of the Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology NIEHS Training Grant, and former chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology at Rutgers University. Dr. Cooper is a member of the Center for Marine and Coastal Research, the Environmental/Science Graduate Program, and the Joint Graduate Program in Toxicology. His research interest is xenobiotic

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316 DIOXINS AND DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS IN THE FOOD SUPPLY metabolism in aquatic animals, including endocrine disrupting compounds, par- ticularly dioxins, dibenzofurans, and phthalates, on finfish and bivalve mollusks. He is also developing both food web and physiological based pharmacokinetic models to better predict chemical movement both in the environment and within the organism of concern. ,IAMES K. HAMMITT, PH.D., is a professor of economics and decision sci- ences in the Department of Health Policy and Management, the Department of Environmental Health, and the Center for Risk Analysis, and is director of the Program in Environmental Science and Risk Management at the Harvard Univer- sity School of Public Health. His research interests include the development and application of quantitative methods of decision and risk analysis, health-risk management and benefit-cost analysis, and mathematical modeling to health and environmental policy. Dr. Hammitt is currently researching management of long- term environmental issues with important scientific uncertainties such as global climate change and stratospheric-ozone depletion, the evaluation of ancillary benefits and countervailing risks associated with risk-control measures, and the characterization of social preferences over health and environmental risks using revealed-preference and contingent-valuation methods. Dr. Hammitt is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board and holds professional memberships in the Association of Environmental and Re- source Economists and the Society for Risk Analysis. GAIL G. HARRISON, PH.D., is a professor and chair of the Department of Community Health Sciences, UCLA School of Public Health. She also serves as associate director for Public Health Programs of the UCLA Center for Human Nutrition and assistant director for the Program for Healthy and At-Risk Popula- tions in the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, UCLA/Jonsson Compre- hensive Cancer Center. Her research interests include dietary and nutritional assessment, international health and nutrition, and pediatric and maternal nutri- tion. She is a former member of the IOM Food and Nutrition Board and has served on several of its committees including the Committee on International Nutrition Programs. ,IAMES T. HEIMBACH, PH.D., is president of JHeimbach LLC, which spe- cializes in food and nutrition consulting. He has national and international expe- rience with a broad range of issues regarding food and nutrition policy; food consumption behavior; assessment of dietary intakes of nutrients, food additives, and contaminants; safety evaluation of food and dietary supplement ingredients; and food regulation. Dr. Heimbach was formerly the chief operating officer of Technical Assessment Systems and a principal of ENVIRON International Cor- poration, following public service at FDA and as associate administrator and acting administrator of the Human Nutrition Information Service of USDA. Dr.

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APPENDIX D 317 Heimbach is a fellow of the American College of Nutrition; a member of the Foods/Dietary Supplement Oversight committee of the Food and Drug Law Insti- tute; and councilor, past division chair, and past section chair of the Institute of Food Technologists. BARBARA A. KNUTH, PH.D., is a professor and chair of the Department of Natural Resources at Cornell University. She also serves as leader of the Human Dimensions Research Unit. Her research interests include assessment of the need for and effectiveness of risk communication, particularly with regard to contami- nated fisheries. Dr. Knuth is first vice president of the American Fisheries Soci- ety and a member of the Fish and Wildlife Executive Committee of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges and a previous mem- ber of the Great Lakes Science Advisory Board of the International Joint Com- mission, and the Board of Technical Experts of the Great Lakes Fishery Commis- sion. She has previously served on the Committee on Improving the Collection and Use of Fisheries Data. ,IAMES D. MCKEAN, D.V.M., ,1.D., is an extension veterinarian and professor in the Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine at Iowa State University's College of Veterinary Medicine. His research interests include swine medicine and extension, food safety, and food law, and the assess- ment of chemical and drug residues in feed and food animals. Dr. McKean also serves as associate director of the Iowa Pork Industry Center, and has previously served on several national committees for governmental policy development, including the Swine Futures Team, the Taskforce on the Future of FSIS Veteri- narians, and as chair of the AASV Pork Safety Committee. PIETER ,1.,1. SAWER, M.D., is a professor and chair of the Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. His research interests include nutrition, growth, and development in infants, spe- cifically with respect to the effects of environmental contaminants like polychlo- rinated biphenyls on health and development in children. Dr. Sauer is a member of the National Health Council (the Netherlands) and the Neonatology Group of the Dutch Society of Pediatrics. He has been European chief editor of the journal Pediatric Research and president of the International Pediatric Research Founda- tion. He has served as the Dutch delegate at the Conference of European Pediatric Specialists and is a member of the Ethical Committee. ROBERT E. SMITH, PH.D., is president of R. E. Smith Consulting, Inc., as well as adjunct professor in the Department of Food Science at the University of Illinois. Prior to consulting to the food industry, Dr. Smith spent almost 30 years as head of corporate research and development at Nabisco, Del Monte, Swift, and The Quaker Oats companies. He has national and international experience with

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318 DIOXINS AND DIOXIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS IN THE FOOD SUPPLY the development of a broad range of food and feed products. His technical exper- tise includes food technology and nutrition, food engineering, packaging, food safety, quality assurance and food regulation. Dr. Smith is a former member of the Food and Nutrition Board and is a former president of the Institute of Food Technologists. MICHAEL R. TAYLOR, ,1.D., is a senior fellow and director of the Risk, Resource and Environmental Management Division of Resources for the Future (RFF). Mr. Taylor also leads the Food System Program at RFF which addresses policy and institutional issues affecting the success of the global food and agri- cultural system in the areas of food security in developing countries, food safety, and the natural resource and environmental sustainability of agriculture. He is a former administrator of the USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service and a former deputy commissioner for policy at FDA. In addition to his public service, Mr. Taylor has been a partner in the law firm of King & Spalding and vice president for Public Policy at Monsanto Company. He is currently cochair of the National Academies' Committee on Use of Third Party Toxicity Research with Human Participants and a member of the Subcommittee on Defining Science- based Concerns Associated with Products of Animal Biotechnology, and has previously served on the Committee on Scientific and Regulatory Issues Under- lying Pesticide Use Patterns and Agricultural Innovation (IOM). KATHERINE L. TUCKER, PH.D., is director of the Dietary Assessment and Epidemiology Research Program at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging. In addition, she is an associate professor and director of the Nutritional Epidemiology program in the School of Nutrition Science and Policy and an adjunct associate professor for the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health in the School of Medicine at Tufts University. Dr. Tucker's research interests include diet and health, dietary assessment methodol- ogy, and the nutritional status of high-risk populations. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Nutrition and the Ecology of Food and Nutrition, and has previously chaired the Nutritional Epidemiology Research Interest Section of the American Society for Nutritional Sciences.