Appendix

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Katharine G. Abraham (Chair) is currently professor of survey methodology and affiliate professor of economics at the University of Maryland. She was commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, from 1993 to 2001. She taught at the University of Maryland and the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was a research associate at the Brookings Institution. She has been an associate editor of the Quarterly Journal of Economics and an assistant editor of the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity. She is a member of the American Economic Association, the National Association for Business Economics, the Industrial Relations Research Association, and the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession. She received her Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1982. She received the Distinguished Achievement Citation from the Iowa State University Alumni Association in 2000.

Dora Costa, is the Ford Career Development associate professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a research associate in the National Bureau of Economic Research's programs on the development of the American economy and on aging. She received her B.A. in economics and mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1986 and her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1993. Her research focuses primarily on issues in labor economics, demography, and health, as interpreted over the long span of American economic history. Her work has covered a wide range of topics including: retirement, elderly living arrangements, determinants of older age mortality and morbidity, long-term trends in the health of the



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Appendix Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Katharine G. Abraham (Chair) is currently professor of survey methodology and affiliate professor of economics at the University of Maryland. She was commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, from 1993 to 2001. She taught at the University of Maryland and the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was a research associate at the Brookings Institution. She has been an associate editor of the Quarterly Journal of Economics and an assistant editor of the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity. She is a member of the American Economic Association, the National Association for Business Economics, the Industrial Relations Research Association, and the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession. She received her Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University in 1982. She received the Distinguished Achievement Citation from the Iowa State University Alumni Association in 2000. Dora Costa, is the Ford Career Development associate professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a research associate in the National Bureau of Economic Research's programs on the development of the American economy and on aging. She received her B.A. in economics and mathematics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1986 and her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1993. Her research focuses primarily on issues in labor economics, demography, and health, as interpreted over the long span of American economic history. Her work has covered a wide range of topics including: retirement, elderly living arrangements, determinants of older age mortality and morbidity, long-term trends in the health of the

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population, and trends in the consumption of recreational goods. She is the author of numerous articles and a book, The Evolution of Retirement: An American Economic History 1880-1990. David Cutler, is professor of economics at Harvard University, in the Economics Department and the Kennedy School of Government, and he is also research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received a B.A., summa cum laude, from Harvard College, and a Ph.D. in economics from at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research is concentrated in health economics, including: measuring the health of the population and understanding how medical and nonmedical factors influence health. He is coeditor of the Journal of Health Economics, and associate editor of the Journal of Public Economics and the Journal of Economic Perspectives. He is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine. During 1993, he was on leave as senior staff economist at the Council of Economic Advisers and director of the National Economic Council. He has been a member of numerous commissions and advisory groups, including the Technical Panel on Social Security, and the Medicare Technical Advisory Panel. Nancy Folbre, is a staff economist with the Center for Popular Economics. Her work focuses on the interface between feminist theory and political economy, with a particular interest in caring labor and other forms of nonmarket work. Her work overlaps the fields of economic history, development, and policy analysis, and touches on game-theoretic approaches to family decisionmaking. Her most recent academic book is Who Pays for the Kids? Gender and the Structures of Constraint. A recent recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Five-Year Fellowship, she also serves as cochair of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on the Family and the Economy and is an associate editor Feminist Economics. Barbara Fraumeni, is a professor of economics at Northeastern University, Boston. Her areas of interest are public economics, microeconomic theory, and industrial organization and regulation. She is currently on leave from Northeastern while serving as chief economist at the Bureau of Economic Analysis. She received her bachelor's degree from Wellesley College and her Ph.D. degree from Boston College. Robert E. Hall, is an applied economist with interests in technology, competition, employment issues, and economic policy, in the aggregate economy and in particular markets. His current research focuses on levels of activity and stock-market valuations in market economies and on the economics of high technology, particularly the Internet. His books include Digital Dealing: How e-Markets Are Transforming the Economy, and The Flat Tax with Alvin Rabushka. He and Rabushka were recognized in Money magazine's Money Hall of Fame (1992) for their contributions to financial innovation over the past 20 years. He has advised a number of government agencies on national economic policy, including the Justice Department, the Treasury Department, and the Federal Reserve Board, and he served on the National Presidential Advisory Committee on Productivity. He also serves as director of the research program on economic fluctuations and growth of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and he chairs the Bureau's Committee on

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Business Cycle Dating, which maintains the semiofficial chronology of the U.S. business cycle. Hall is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society. He received his B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1964 and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1967. Daniel S. Hamermesh, is Edward Everett Hale Centennial Professor of Economics at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his A.B. from the University of Chicago in 1965, and his Ph.D. from Yale in 1969. He has taught at Princeton and Michigan State and has held visiting professorships at universities in the United States, Europe, Australia, and Asia. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society, a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and of the Institute for the Study of Labor, and past president of the Society of Labor Economists and of the Midwest Economics Association. He authored Labor Demand, The Economics of Work and Pay, and a wide array of articles in labor economics in the leading general and specialized economics journals. His research concentrates on labor demand, time use, and unusual applications of labor economics (to suicide, sleep and beauty). Alan Krueger, is at The Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University. His primary research and teaching interests are in the general areas of labor economics, education, industrial relations, and social insurance. He is the author of Education Matters: A Selection of Essays on Education, and the editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives. His current research projects include a study of the effect of economic growth on employment and income of less skilled workers, an examination of the effect of education on economic growth across nations, a study of the relationship between school quality and student outcomes, and an analysis of the impact of technological change on the labor market. He writes a monthly column on economics for The New York Times. He is an elected a fellow of the Econometric Society and was awarded the Kershaw Prize by the Association for Public Policy and Management in 1997. He served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor in 1994-1995. He holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Christopher Mackie, is a study director with the Committee on National Statistics (CNSTAT). In addition to working with this panel, he is studying data access and confidentiality, and he directed the Panel on Conceptual, Measurement, and Other Statistical Issues in Developing Cost-of-Living Indexes. Prior to joining CNSTAT, Mackie was a senior economist with SAG Corporation, where he conducted a variety of econometric studies in the areas of labor and personnel economics, primarily for federal agencies. He completed his Ph.D. in economics at the University of North Carolina and, while a graduate student, held teaching positions at the University of North Carolina, North Carolina State University, and Tulane University. He is the author of Canonizing Economic Theory. Robert Michael, is the Eliakim Hastings Moore Distinguished Service Professor in the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies at the University of Chicago. Previously, he was director of the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) and director the West Coast office of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He also

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previously taught at Stanford University and the University of California at Los Angeles. His research interest and publications cover family economics, including the causes of divorce, the reasons for the growth of one-person households, the impact of inflation on families, and the consequences of the rise in women's employment for the family, especially children; and expenditure patterns in the household, including the factors that determine parental spending on children in various types of households. He serves on the Boards of the Chapin Hall Center for Children and NORC and cochairs the Board of Visitors of Western Reserve Academy in Hudson, Ohio. He was elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1994. Henry Peskin, is president of Edgevale Associates, a consulting company. He was formerly on the staffs of the National Bureau of Economic Research, the Urban Institute, and the Institute for Defense Analysis and, most recently, at Resources for the Future. With training in chemical engineering, an undergraduate degree in political science, and a graduate degree in economics, he has written extensively on methods to expand the national economic accounts in order to better measure resource and environmental degradation. As a consultant to the World Bank and the U.S. Agency for International Development, he has surveyed environmental accounting practices in industrialized countries and has advised developing countries on the design and implementation of environmental accounting systems. Matthew Shapiro, is a professor of economics and senior research scientist at the Survey Research Center at the University of Michigan, and is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received B.A. and M.A. degrees from Yale in 1979 and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1984. He was coeditor of the American Economic Review and is a member of its board of editors. His general area of research is macroeconomics, and he has carried out projects on investment and capital utilization, business-cycle fluctuations, consumption and saving, financial markets, monetary policy, and time-series econometrics. Among his current research interests are assessing the degree and effects of the reallocation of productive capital across firms and industries, modeling saving, retirement, portfolio choices of households, and improving the quality of national economic statistics. During 1993-1994, he served as senior economist at the Council of Economic Advisers, and he is now a member of the Academic Advisory Panel of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. He is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on National Statistics, the Federal Economic Statistics Advisory Committee, and the executive committee of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth. Burton Weisbrod, is a John Evans professor of economics at Northwestern University. His research focuses on two overlapping areas--determinants of technological change in medical care and the role of private nonprofit organizations relative to for-profit and government organizations. The latter topic often involves the health sector, in which the three types of organizations coexist and compete in such industries as hospitals and nursing homes. The central question is the ways in which organization behavior differs systematically among organizations.