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Appendix B

Biographical Information on Speakers and Steering Committee Members

SPEAKERS

R. Stephen Berry (symposium chair) is the James Franck Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, Department of Chemistry, at the James Franck Institute at The University of Chicago. He received his A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. from Harvard University After an 18-month instructorship at Harvard, in 1957 he became an instructor in the Chemistry Department of the University of Michigan, and in 1960 he moved on to Yale as an assistant professor. In 1964 he joined the University of Chicago's Chemistry Department and James Franck Institute (then the Institute for the Study of Metals) as an associate professor. He became a professor in 1967 and James Franck Distinguished Service Professor in 1989. In 1983 he received a MacArthur Prize Fellowship, and he has spent extended periods at the University of Copenhagen, Oxford, Université de Paris-Sud, and the Frei Universität Berlin. Dr. Berry's research interests include electronic structure of atoms and molecules; photo-collisional detachment of negative ions; photochemistry of reactive organic molecules; vibronic coupling processes such as autoionization, predissociation, and internal vibrational relaxation; thermodynamics of finite-time processes; dynamics and structure of atomic and molecular clusters; phase changes in very small systems; chaos and ergodicity in few-body systems; and, most recently, as an outgrowth of the cluster studies, dynamics on many-dimensional potential surfaces and the origins of protein folding. He has also worked extensively with the efficient use of environmental energy and other resources. Dr. Berry is also interested with issues of science and law and with management of scientific data, activities that have brought him into the arena of electronic media for scientific information and issues of intellectual property in that context. He is a member and home secretary of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). He has been involved in many activities of the National Academies, including chairing the National Resource Council's (NRC) study on the Bits of Power: Issues in the Global Access to Scientific Data.

James Boyle is William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law at the Duke University School of Law and author of Shamans, Software and Spleens: Law and the Construction of the Information Society (Harvard University Press, 1996) as well as many articles and essays about intellectual property and social and legal theory. He is a member of the Board of Creative Commons and of the academic advisory board of the Electronic Privacy and Information Center. He is working on a book called The Public Domain. His Web site is http://james-boyle.com.



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Page 206 Appendix B Biographical Information on Speakers and Steering Committee Members SPEAKERS R. Stephen Berry (symposium chair) is the James Franck Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, Department of Chemistry, at the James Franck Institute at The University of Chicago. He received his A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. from Harvard University After an 18-month instructorship at Harvard, in 1957 he became an instructor in the Chemistry Department of the University of Michigan, and in 1960 he moved on to Yale as an assistant professor. In 1964 he joined the University of Chicago's Chemistry Department and James Franck Institute (then the Institute for the Study of Metals) as an associate professor. He became a professor in 1967 and James Franck Distinguished Service Professor in 1989. In 1983 he received a MacArthur Prize Fellowship, and he has spent extended periods at the University of Copenhagen, Oxford, Université de Paris-Sud, and the Frei Universität Berlin. Dr. Berry's research interests include electronic structure of atoms and molecules; photo-collisional detachment of negative ions; photochemistry of reactive organic molecules; vibronic coupling processes such as autoionization, predissociation, and internal vibrational relaxation; thermodynamics of finite-time processes; dynamics and structure of atomic and molecular clusters; phase changes in very small systems; chaos and ergodicity in few-body systems; and, most recently, as an outgrowth of the cluster studies, dynamics on many-dimensional potential surfaces and the origins of protein folding. He has also worked extensively with the efficient use of environmental energy and other resources. Dr. Berry is also interested with issues of science and law and with management of scientific data, activities that have brought him into the arena of electronic media for scientific information and issues of intellectual property in that context. He is a member and home secretary of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). He has been involved in many activities of the National Academies, including chairing the National Resource Council's (NRC) study on the Bits of Power: Issues in the Global Access to Scientific Data. James Boyle is William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law at the Duke University School of Law and author of Shamans, Software and Spleens: Law and the Construction of the Information Society (Harvard University Press, 1996) as well as many articles and essays about intellectual property and social and legal theory. He is a member of the Board of Creative Commons and of the academic advisory board of the Electronic Privacy and Information Center. He is working on a book called The Public Domain. His Web site is http://james-boyle.com.

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Page 207 Sherry Brandt-Rauf is associate research scholar at the Center for the Study of Society and Medicine of the Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons. Trained at Columbia in law and sociology, she teaches and does research on areas in which law and medicine overlap. Particular areas of interest include the ownership of scientific data, occupational health, genetic testing, conflicts of interest, and the ethics of research on vulnerable populations. She recently completed an individual project fellowship at the Open Society Institute, researching the nature of the pharmaceutical industry's interactions with medical students and residents and the effects of such interactions on the practice of medicine. In addition, under a grant from the Jewish Women's Foundation of New York, she recently prepared an online information booklet for Ashkenazi Jewish women dealing with genetic testing for BRCA mutations. She sits on the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center Institutional Review Board and Pediatric Ethics Committee. Francis Bretherton obtained his Ph.D. in applied mathematics at the University of Cambridge, England. His research areas include atmospheric dynamics and ocean currents. He has been a member of the faculty at Cambridge, at the Johns Hopkins University, and at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he is now professor emeritus in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. From 1974 to 1981, he was director of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado, and president of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. Since then, he has been deeply involved in planning national and international research programs on climate and changes in our global environment. From 1982 to 1987, he was chair of the NASA Earth System Sciences Committee, which formulated the strategy for the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Dr. Bretherton chaired the Global Observing System Space Panel under the auspices of the World Meteorological Organization from 1998 to 2000. He has served on many committees of the NRC, most recently as chair of the Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data, and is also a member of advisory panels and boards to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Climate and Global Change Research and on Climate System Modeling. Bertram Bruce is a professor of library and information science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he has been a member of the faculty since 1990. Before moving to Illinois, he taught computer science at Rutgers (1971-1974) and was a principal scientist at Bolt, Beranek and Newman (1974-1990). His research and teaching focus on new literacies, inquiry-based learning, and technology studies. A major focus of his work is with the Distributed Knowledge Research Collaborative studying new practices in scientific research. Other studies include research on education enhancements to Biology Workbench (a computational environment that facilitates bioinformatics research, teaching, and learning); Plants, Pathogens and People; Physics Outreach; and SEARCH. His analytical work has focused on changes in the nature of knowledge, community, and literacy. He serves on the editorial boards of Educational Theory, Computers and Composition, Discourse Processes, Computer, International Journal of Educational Technology, and Interactive Learning Environments. Julie Cohen is professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center. She teaches and writes about intellectual property and information privacy issues, with particular focus on computer software and digital works and on the intersection of copyright, privacy, and the First Amendment in cyberspace. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, the Advisory Board of Public Knowledge, and the Board of Academic Advisors to the American Committee for Interoperable Systems. From 1995 to 1999, Professor Cohen taught at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. From 1992 to 1995, she practiced with the San Francisco firm of McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enersen, where she specialized in intellectual property litigation. Professor Cohen received her A.B. from Harvard and her J.D. from Harvard School of Law. She was a former law clerk to the Honorable Stephen Reinhardt of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Robert Cook-Deegan is director of the Center for Genome Ethics, Law, and Policy at Duke University. He is also a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Investigator at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University, where he is completing a primer on how national policy decisions are made about health research. Until July 2002,

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Page 208 he directed the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellowship program at the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the National Academies. In 1996 Dr. Cook-Deegan was a Cecil and Ida Green Fellow at the University of Texas, Dallas, following his work on the National Academies' report on Allocating Federal Funds for Science and Technology. From 1991 through 1994, he directed IOM's Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders (since renamed Neuroscience and Behavioral Health). He worked for the National Center for Human Genome Research from 1989 to 1990, after serving as acting executive director of the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee of the U.S. Congress, 1988-1989. An Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant culminated in The Gene Wars: Science, Politics, and the Human Genome. He continues as a consultant to the DNA Patent Database at Georgetown University. Dr. Cook-Deegan came to Washington, D.C. in 1982 as a congressional science fellow and stayed five more years at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment, ultimately becoming a senior associate. He received his B.S. degree in chemistry, magna cum laude, from Harvard, and his M.D. degree from the University of Colorado. Dr. Cook-Deegan chairs the Royalty Fund Advisory Committee for the Alzheimer's Association, is secretary and trustee of the Foundation for Genetic Medicine, and former chair of Section X (Social Impacts of Science and Engineering) for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), where he is also a fellow. Dana Dalrymple is senior research advisor in the Office of Agriculture and Food Security, U.S. Agency for International Development and agricultural economist in the Foreign Agricultural Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He has helped administer U.S. government involvement in, and support of, the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research and its network of 16 centers for 30 years. Dr. Dalrymple is a long-time student of the development and adoption of agricultural technology in agriculture, both in the United States and internationally, and has published widely on this subject. He has also served as an analyst on studies of agricultural research conducted by the NAS (as part of a larger project) and the Office of Technology Assessment of the U.S. Congress. He has recently reviewed the role of international agricultural research as a global public good. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Cornell University, his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Michigan State University, and was a member of the Department of Agricultural Economics at the University of Connecticut. Paul David is professor of economics at Stanford University and senior fellow of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, where he leads the Program on Knowledge Networks and Institutions for Innovation. Since 1994 he has held a joint appointment as senior research fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is an elected fellow of the International Econometrics Society, of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and of the British Academy; he was president elect and president of the Economic History Association and served until 2001 as an elected member of the Council of the Royal Economics Society. In 1997 the University of Oxford conferred on Professor David the title professor of economics and economic history “in recognition of distinction.” He is known internationally for his contributions in American economic history, economic and historical demography, and the economics of science and technology. Much of Professor David's research has been directed toward characterizing the conditions under which microeconomic and macroeconomic processes exhibit “path-dependent dynamics.” He has published more than 130 journal articles and chapters in edited books, in addition to authoring and editing a number of books under his name. Daniel Drell is a biologist with the Human Genome Program, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), of the U.S. Department of Energy. His responsibilities include oversight of the component of the OBER Genome Program devoted to Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications. Prior to joining the OBER in April 1991, Dr. Drell worked as a visiting scientist in the HLA Laboratory of the American Red Cross Holland Laboratory where he participated in ongoing research and service activities on HLA typing of donor blood samples for the bone marrow matching program. From 1986 to 1990, he was at the George Washington University Medical Center, ending up as an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine and associate director of the Immunogenetics and Immunochemistry Laboratories. From 1983 to 1986, he was a staff fellow in the Laboratory of Oral Medicine at the National Institute of Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, conducting research in the areas of the cell-mediated immunology of type 1 diabetes mellitus and autoimmune myositis. He has also held positions at the

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Page 209 Baylor College of Medicine, the Population Council's Center for Biomedical Research, and the Laboratory of Developmental Genetics at Sloan-Kettering. Dr. Drell received his Ph.D. in immunology from the University of Alberta, Edmonton, and his B.A. in biology from Harvard College. He has published nearly 30 scientific articles and abstracts. Shirley P. Dutton is a senior research scientist and senior technical advisor to the director, Bureau of Economic Geology, the University of Texas at Austin. She received a B.A. in geological sciences from the University of Rochester, graduating with highest honors and election to Phi Beta Kappa. She earned M.A. and Ph.D. degrees, also in geological sciences, from the University of Texas at Austin. She has worked at the Bureau of Economic Geology since 1977, and her technical expertise is in clastic sedimentology and diagenesis. Dr. Dutton was a distinguished lecturer for the American Association of Petroleum Geologists in 1987. She has authored or coauthored 172 published papers and abstracts. David Heyman joined the Center for Strategic and International Studies in November 2001 as a senior fellow for science and security initiatives—studies that explore the increasingly interconnected world of science, technology, and national security policy. Previously he served as a senior advisor to the Secretary of Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy from 1998 to 2001 and in the White House in the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the National Security and International Affairs division from 1995 to 1998. Prior to joining the Clinton administration, Mr. Heyman briefly worked as a consultant with Ernst & Young in their International Privatization and Economics Group in London, and was the director of International Operations for a New York software company developing supply-chain management systems for Fortune 100 firms. He has worked in Europe, Russia, and the Middle East. Mr. Heyman carried out his undergraduate work at Brandeis University, with a concentration in biology; his graduate work at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies was in technology policy and international economics. Stephen Hilgartner is associate professor in the Department of Science and Technology Studies at Cornell University. Professor Hilgartner's research focuses on social studies of science and technology, especially biology, biotechnology, and medicine; biology, ethics, and politics; science as property; ethnography of science; and risk. His recent book, Science on Stage: Expert Advice as Public Drama (Stanford, 2000), explores the processes through which the expertise of science advisors is established, contested, and maintained. He is the author of many articles, book chapters, and reviews, including a series of works on data access and ownership. His work has appeared in such journals as the Journal of Molecular Biology; the Journal of the American Medical Association; Social Studies of Science; Science, Technology, and Human Values; Science Communication; and the American Journal of Sociology. Professor Hilgartner is chair of the Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues committee of the Cornell Genomics Initiative. He is a member of the Council of the Society for Social Studies of Science. He is also a member of the Steering Group of the Section on Societal Impacts of Science and Engineering of the AAAS. He is currently completing a book on genome mapping and sequencing in the 1990s. Justin Hughes is assistant professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and was an attorney advisor in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office from 1997 to 2001, focusing on initiatives in Internet-related intellectual property issues, Eleventh Amendment immunity issues, intellectual property law in developing economies, and on copyright appellate filings for the United States (including the Napster litigation). Professor Hughes practiced law in Paris and Los Angeles and clerked for the Lord President of the Malaysian Supreme Court in Kuala Lumpur. He is a former Henry Luce Scholar, Mellon Fellow in the Humanities, and American Bar Association (ABA) Baxter Scholar at the Hague Court. He was a visiting professor at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Law. He received his B.A. from Oberlin and his J.D. from Harvard. Tracy Lewis was the James W. Walter Eminent Scholar of Entrepreneurship at the University of Florida and became the newly appointed director of the Duke University Innovation Center and professor of Economics at the Fuqua School of Business in January 2003. His research and teaching interests are in the areas of innovation

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Page 210 processes, industrial organization, and financial and incentive contracting. Professor Lewis has published numerous articles on the management of open-access resources and has been a consultant for several federal regulatory agencies and private corporations on issues of patent policy and protection of intellectual property. Stephen M. Maurer has practiced intellectual property litigation since 1982. He currently co-teaches a course on Internet law and economics at the School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. Mr. Maurer has written extensively on patent reform, proposed database legislation, and science policy. Over the past four years, he has worked with academic scientists trying to build a variety of commercially self-supporting databases. In 2000 he helped a worldwide community of academic biologists (The Mutations Database Initiative or MDI) negotiate a $3.2 million Memorandum of Understanding with Incyte Genomics. Under the proposed agreement, Incyte would have helped MDI scientists build a unified, computationally advanced archive for worldwide human mutations data. In return, MDI would have granted Incyte the exclusive right to host the database on a commercial web site. Academic and commercial users would have remained free to download and use the database for all other purposes. Mr. Maurer has also helped Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory physicists design a commercial venture for archiving high-energy accelerator data. He is a graduate of Yale University and Harvard School of Law. He has published in many journals, including Nature, Science, Economica, Sky & Telescope, and Beam Line. Michael Morgan is director of Research Partnerships & Ventures and chief executive of the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Cambridge, England. Dr. Morgan joined the Wellcome Trust in 1983 and now is responsible for development of new enterprises such as the Synchrotron Project (a joint project with the U.K. and French governments) and the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Consortium. He plays a major role in the international coordination of the Human Genome Project and is also responsible for scientific establishments such as the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus. Three independent institutions are located on the campus: the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, the European Bioinformatics Institute, and the MRC Human Genome Mapping Resource Centre. Dr. Morgan is a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, and obtained his Ph.D. from Leicester University. Harlan Onsrud is professor of spatial information science and engineering at the University of Maine and a research scientist with the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. He is immediate past president of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science, a nonprofit organization of over 70 universities and other research institutions dedicated to advancing understanding of geographic processes, relationships, and patterns through improved theory, methods, technology, and data. Professor Onsrud is chair of the NRC's U.S. National Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) and also serves on the NRC's Mapping Science Committee. A licensed attorney and engineer, his research focuses on the analysis of legal, ethical, and institutional issues affecting the creation and use of digital spatial databases and the assessment of the social impacts of spatial technologies. He teaches a range of legal courses to students in engineering, information systems, and computer science, including a graduate course in information systems law. Bruce Perens is one of the founding Linux developers and is best known as the creator of the Open Source Definition, the canonical guidelines for open-source licensing. Mr. Perens is cofounder of the Open Source Initiative, the Linux Standard Base, and Software in the Public Interest. His first Free Software program, Electric Fence, is widely used in both commercial and free software development. His Busybox software became a standard tool kit in the embedded systems field and is thus included in many commercial print servers, firewalls, and storage devices. Mr. Perens has 19 years experience in the feature film business and is credited on the films “A Bug's Life” and “Toy Story II.” As both a leader of open-source software and a long-time participant in the film industry, he is uniquely qualified to comment on the oft-painful intersection of copyright protection and the public domain. Mr. Perens was formerly employed as senior strategist for Linux and Open Source at Hewlett Packard. He is the primary author of that corporation's open-source policy manual. Susan R. Poulter is professor of law at the S.J. Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, in Salt Lake City. She holds B.S. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry, both from the University of California, Berkeley. After a period

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Page 211 during which she taught chemistry at the University of Utah, she received a J.D. from the University of Utah College of Law in 1983, where she was executive editor of the Utah Law Review and was inducted into the Order of the Coif. She joined the faculty of the College of Law in 1990, after seven years in private law practice. She teaches in the areas of environmental law, intellectual property, and torts. Professor Poulter has written and lectured on scientific evidence and environmental law. She is a coauthor of the Reference Guide on Medical Testimony in the second edition of the Federal Judicial Center's Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence. She is a member of the Council of the Section of Science and Technology Law of the ABA and has served as a section representative to the National Conference of Lawyers and Scientists (NCLS), a joint committee of the ABA and the AAAS. Currently, she is the ABA cochair of the NCLS. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the AAAS project on Court-Appointed Scientific Experts and participated in the AAAS Workshop on Intellectual Property and Scientific Publishing in the Electronic Age. Rudolph Potenzone became president and CEO of LION Bioscience, Inc. in March 2001. With over 20 years of cheminformatics experience, he most recently served as senior vice president for marketing and development at MDL, where he managed the design, development, and marketing of MDL's software and database products. Previously, Dr. Potenzone was director of research and new product development at Chemical Abstracts Service, as well as holding senior positions at Polygen/Molecular Simulations, Inc. Dr. Potenzone holds a Ph.D. in macro-molecular science from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and a B.S. in biophysics and microbiology from the University of Pittsburgh. Jerome H. Reichman became Bunyan A. Womble Professor of Law at Duke University in July 2000, where he teaches in the field of contracts and intellectual property. Before coming to Duke, he taught at Vanderbilt, Michigan, Florida and Ohio State universities and at the University of Rome, Italy. He graduated from the University of Chicago (B.A.) and attended Yale School of Law, where he received his J.D. degree. Professor Reichman has written and lectured widely on diverse aspects of intellectual property law, including comparative and international intellectual property law and the connections between intellectual property and international trade law. Other recent writings have focused on intellectual property rights in data, the appropriate contractual regime for online delivery of computer programs and other information goods, and new ways to stimulate investment in subpatentable innovation without impoverishing the public domain. Professor Reichman has served as consultant to the U.S. National Committee for CODATA at the National Academies on the subject of legal protection for databases. He also is an academic advisor to the American Committee for Interoperable Systems; a consultant to the Technology Program of the UN Conference on Trade and Development; and was a consultant on the UN Development Program's flagship project on Innovation, Culture, Biogenetic Resources, and Traditional Knowledge. Suzanne Scotchmer is professor of economics and public policy at the University of California, Berkeley. Her graduate degrees are a Ph.D. in economics and an M.A. in statistics, both from the University of California, Berkeley. She has held visiting appointments or fellowships at the University of Cergy-Pontoise, Tel Aviv University, University of Paris I (Sorbonne), Boalt School of Law, the University of Toronto School of Law, Yale University School of Law, Stanford University, the Hoover Institution, and the New School of Economics, Moscow. She has published extensively on the economics of intellectual property, rules of evidence, tax enforcement, cooperative game theory, club theory, and evolutionary game theory. Her work has appeared in Econometrica, American Economic Review, Quarterly Journal of Economics, the RAND Journal of Economics, the Journal of Public Economics, Journal of Economic Theory, the New Palgrave Dictionary of Law and Economics, and as commentary in Science. She was previously on the editorial board of the American Economic Review, the Journal of Economic Perspectives, and the Journal of Public Economics, and is currently on the editorial board of the Journal of Economic Literature and Regional Science and Urban Economics. In 1998-1999 she served on the NRC Committee on Promoting Access to Scientific and Technical Data for the Public Interest and has appeared before several other committees of the NRC, mostly regarding intellectual property. She has served as a consultant for the U.S. Department of Justice, Antitrust Division, and for private clients in disputes regarding intellectual property.

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Page 212 Paul F. Uhlir is director of the Office of International Scientific and Technical Information Programs at the National Academies in Washington, D.C. His current area of emphasis is on scientific and technical data management and policy and on the relationship of intellectual property law in digital data and information to research and development policy. In 1997 he received the NAS Special Achievement Award for his work in this area. Mr. Uhlir has been employed at the National Academies since 1985, first as a senior staff officer for the Space Studies Board, where he worked on solar system exploration and environmental remote sensing studies for NASA, and then as associate executive director of the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. Before joining the National Academies, he worked in the general counsel's office and as a foreign affairs officer at NOAA. He has directed and published over 20 NRC studies and written or edited over 40 articles and books. Mr. Uhlir has a B.A. in history from the University of Oregon, and a J.D. and M.A. degrees in international relations, with a focus on space law and arms control, from the University of San Diego. Peter N. Weiss began work with the Strategic Planning and Policy Office of the NOAA National Weather Service, in March 2000. His responsibilities include domestic and international data policy issues, with a view toward fostering a healthy public-private partnership. Mr. Weiss was a senior policy analyst and attorney in the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget (OMB), since 1991. Mr. Weiss analyzed policy and legal issues involving information resources and information technology management, with particular emphasis on electronic data interchange and electronic commerce. He is primary author of the information policy sections of OMB Circular A-130, “Management of Federal Information Resources,” and was a member of the administration's Electronic Commerce Working Group (See “A Framework for Global Electronic Commerce”). From 1990 to 1991, Mr. Weiss was deputy associate administrator for procurement law, Office of Federal Procurement Policy. In this position, he analyzed legal and policy issues affecting the procurement process. Major projects included examination of legal and regulatory issues involving procurement automation, policies and Federal Acquisition Regulation revisions to facilitate electronic data interchange, as well as automatic data processing procurement legal and policy issues. From 1985 to 1990, Mr. Weiss was the assistant chief counsel for procurement and regulatory policy, Office of Advocacy, U.S. Small Business Administration. From 1981 to 1985, Mr. Weiss was in private practice in Washington, D.C. Mr. Weiss holds a B.A. from Columbia University and a J.D. from the Catholic University of America, Columbus School of Law. A recent publication is “International Information Policy in Conflict: Open and Unrestricted Access versus Government Commercialization,” in Borders in Cyberspace, Kahin and Nesson, eds. (MIT Press, 1997). Ann J. Wolpert is director of libraries for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and has reporting responsibility for the MIT Press. Her responsibilities include membership on the Committee on Copyright and Patents, the Council on Educational Technology, the Dean's Committee, and the President's Academic Council. She chairs the Management Board of the MIT Press and the Board of Trustees of Technology Review, Inc. Prior to joining MIT, Ms. Wolpert was executive director of library and information services at the Harvard Business School. Her experience previous to Harvard included management of the Information Center of Arthur D. Little, Inc., an international management and technology consulting firm, where she was also engaged in consulting assignments. She is active in the professional library community, currently serving on the Board of the Boston Library Consortium, on the Board of the Association of Research Libraries; and as a member of the editorial boards of Library & Information Science Research and The Journal of Library Administration. She is a trustee of Simmons College in Boston, Massachusetts, and presently serves as an advisor to the Publications Committee of the Massachusetts Medical Society. Recent consulting assignments have taken her to the campuses of INCAE in Costa Rica and Nicaragua and to the Malaysia University of Science and Technology, Selangor, Malaysia. A frequent speaker and writer, Ms. Wolpert has recently contributed papers on such topics as library service to remote library users, intellectual property management in the electronic environment, and the future of research libraries in the digital age. She received a B.A. from Boston University and an M.L.S. from Simmons College. Wm. A. Wulf is president of the National Academy of Engineering and vice chair of the NRC, the principal operating arm of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. He is on leave from the University of

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Page 213 Virginia, Charlottesville, where he is AT&T Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Among his activities at the university are a complete revision of the undergraduate computer science curriculum, research on computer architecture and computer security, and an effort to assist humanities scholars exploit information technology. Dr. Wulf has had a distinguished professional career that includes serving as assistant director of the National Science Foundation; chair and chief executive officer of Tartan Laboratories Inc., Pittsburgh; and professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh. He is the author of more than 80 papers and technical reports, has written three books, and holds two U.S. patents. Jonathan Zittrain is the Jack N. and Lillian R. Berkman Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard School of Law, and a faculty director of its Berkman Center for Internet & Society. His research includes digital property, privacy, and speech, and the role played by private “middle people” in Internet architecture. He currently teaches “Internet & Society: The Technologies and Politics of Control” and has a strong interest in creative, useful, and unobtrusive ways to deploy technology in the classroom. He holds a J.D. from Harvard School of Law, an M.P.A. from the J.F.K. School of Government, and a B.S. in cognitive science and artificial intelligence from Yale. He is also a 15-year veteran sysop of CompuServe's online forums. STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERS David R. Lide, Jr. (chair) is a consultant and the former director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Standard Reference Data Division. His expertise is in physical chemistry and scientific information. He has served as president of the international CODATA, chair of CODATA's publication committee, and chair of the U.S. National Committee for CODATA. He is currently a member of the International Council for Science/ CODATA Ad Hoc Group on Data and Information, which focuses on problems of intellectual property rights and access to data, and a fellow of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. Dr. Lide is the editor-in-chief of CRC's Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. Hal Abelson is the Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering with MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. He holds an A.B. from Princeton, and a Ph.D. in mathematics from MIT. In 1992, Professor Abelson was designated as one of MIT's six inaugural MacVicar Faculty Fellows in recognition of his significant and sustained contributions to teaching and undergraduate education. He was 1992 recipient of the Bose Award (MIT's School of Engineering teaching award) and the winner of the 1995 Taylor L. Booth Education Award given by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Computer Society, cited for his continued contributions to the pedagogy and teaching of introductory computer science. Professor Abelson has a longstanding interest in using computation as a conceptual framework in teaching, and he is currently teaching a class on Ethics and Law on the Electronic Frontier. He is a fellow of IEEE. Mostafa El-Sayed is the Julius Brown Chair, Regents' Professor and Director of the Laser Dynamics Laboratory at the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he joined the faculty in 1994. Professor El-Sayed received his B.Sc. from Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, and his Ph.D. from Florida State University. After being a research associate at Harvard, Yale, and the California Institute of Technology, he was appointed to the faculty of the University of California at Los Angeles in 1961. He was an Alfred P. Sloan, John Simon Guggenheim fellow, a visiting professor at the University of Paris, a Sherman Fairchild distinguished scholar at California Institute of Technology, and a Senior Alexander von Humboldt fellow at the Technical University of Munich. Professor El-Sayed is the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Physical Chemistry A and B and was an editor of the International Reviews of Physical Chemistry. Professor El-Sayed is a member of the NAS and the Third World Academy of Science and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, and the AAAS. Mark Frankel, Ph.D., directs the Scientific Freedom, Responsibility and Law Program at the AAAS. He is responsible for developing and managing AAAS activities related to science, ethics, and law. He serves as staff

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Page 214 officer to two AAAS committees—the Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility and the AAAS-ABA National Conference of Lawyers and Scientists. He is editor of Professional Ethics Report, the program's quarterly newsletter, and is a fellow of AAAS. Maureen Kelly recently served as vice president for planning at BIOSIS, which is the largest abstracting and indexing service for the life sciences community, and is now a consultant. Ms. Kelly worked in different capacities for BIOSIS since 1969. Previously she had production responsibility for the bibliographic and scientific content of BIOSIS products. While in that position, she led the team that developed the system for capturing and managing indexing data in support of BIOSIS's new relational indexing. Ms. Kelly has authored a number of papers on managing and accessing biological information. She is currently secretary of the AAAS Section on Information, Computing, and Communication. She has served on various professional society research and publishing committees, including participating in several NAS E-Journal Summit meetings. Ms. Kelly is a member of the U.S. National Committee for CODATA and served on the NRC Committee on Promoting Access to Scientific and Technical Data in the Public Interest: An Assessment of Policy Options. Pamela Samuelson is a professor of law and information management at the University of California at Berkeley and codirector of the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology. Her expertise is in intellectual property law, and she has written and spoken extensively about the challenges that new information technologies are posing for public policy and traditional legal regimes. Prior to joining the faculty at Berkeley, Professor Samuelson was at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, where she had taught since 1981. A graduate of Yale School of Law, she has also practiced with the New York firm of Willkie Farr & Gallagher and served as the principal investigator for the Software Licensing Project at Carnegie Mellon University. In 1997 Professor Samuelson was named a fellow of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. In 1998 she was recognized by the National Law Journal as being among the 50 most influential female lawyers in the country and among the eight most influential in Northern California. She was recently elected to membership in the American Law Institute and named a fellow of the Association of Computing Machinery. In 2001 she was appointed to a University of California, Berkeley, Chancellor's Professorship for distinguished research, teaching, and service for her contributions to both Boalt Hall and the School of Information Management and Systems. Professor Samuelson was a member of the U.S. National Committee for CODATA and the NRC's Computer Science and Telecommunications Board's Committee on Intellectual Property Rights and the Emerging Information Infrastructure. Martha E. Williams is director of the Information Retrieval Research Lab and a professor of Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests include digital database management, online retrieval systems, systems analysis and design, chemical information systems, and electronic publishing. She has published widely on these topics and has been editor of the Annual Review of Information Sciences and Technology (since 1975), Computer Readable Databases: A Directory & Data Sourcebook (1976-1987), and Online Review (since 1977). Professor Williams was chair of the Board of Engineering Information, Inc. from 1980 to 1988, was appointed to the National Library of Medicine's Board of Regents from 1978 to 1981, and served as chair of the board in 1981. In addition, she served on several NRC committees, including the Numerical Data Advisory Board (1979-1982). She has an A.B. from Barat College and an M.A. from Loyola University. Ms. Williams was a member of the NRC's Committee for a Study on Promoting Access to Scientific and Technical Data for the Public Interest.