Appendix C
Workshop Materials

DECEMBER 2001 WORKSHOP AGENDA

Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology

Workshop

December 11, 2001

8:30 am

Welcome, Introduction of ILIT Committee, and Project Overview

Oak Room

Roy Pea and Wm. A. Wulf, ILIT cochairs

8:45

Workshop Participant “Show and Tell”

Attendees are invited to share information or a short demonstration of some exciting education technology they are familiar with (5 minute limit).

• Michael Turturice will share his experience as a first year teacher in a fully online criminal justice class that he created through and for Virtual High School <www.govhs.org>.

• Jim Minstrell will present the tools of the Diagnoser Project. Teachers use it for formative assessment in science and mathematics from grades 7-10. It is also considered a professional development tool for teachers to learn more about



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Appendix C Workshop Materials DECEMBER 2001 WORKSHOP AGENDA Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology Workshop December 11, 2001 8:30 am Welcome, Introduction of ILIT Committee, and Project Overview Oak Room Roy Pea and Wm. A. Wulf, ILIT cochairs 8:45 Workshop Participant “Show and Tell” Attendees are invited to share information or a short demonstration of some exciting education technology they are familiar with (5 minute limit). • Michael Turturice will share his experience as a first year teacher in a fully online criminal justice class that he created through and for Virtual High School <www.govhs.org>. • Jim Minstrell will present the tools of the Diagnoser Project. Teachers use it for formative assessment in science and mathematics from grades 7-10. It is also considered a professional development tool for teachers to learn more about

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  content but especially to learn more about learners’ thinking in science and mathematics <tutor.psych.washington.edu>. 9:30 Break 9:45 Understanding Literacy in an Educational Context Tom Landauer, University of Colorado Professor Landauer will discuss “reading to learn” literacy challenges as a contextual foundation for viewing the subsequent technology demonstrations. Tom Landauer joined Bell Labs in 1969, where he worked in the Human Information Processing research department until the late seventies when he formed the computer-user psychology group, the first industrial human-computer interaction research laboratory. This group moved to Bellcore and changed its name and span of interest to Cognitive Science Research. A highly interactive team of computer scientists and cognitive psychologists, the group specialized in research on information retrieval, navigation and display, primarily based on empirical studies of users and the invention of computer-based solutions to their problems, as well developing methods for improving the usefulness and usability of computer-based mental work tools in general. Landauer was the group’s director from 1984 to 1994. Among its major accomplishments were the development of the Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) text retrieval method and the SuperBook text browser. Landauer was one of the principal designers of both, and of several other applications. In 1994, Landauer moved to the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he is a professor of psychology and a fellow of the Institute of Cognitive Science, an interdisciplinary combination of cognitive psychology, linguistics, computer science, education and philosophy. Landauer is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) , the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. He received his Ph.D. in psychology from Harvard. 10:15 General Overview of Each Technology Station (5 minute limit) Marlene Scardamalia and Chris Teplovs, Knowledge Forum Susan Goldman, Little Planet Literacy Series Bernard Dodge, WebQuest 10:30 Break and Groups of 20 Shift to View the Technology Stations

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10:45 Three Stations Showcasing a Variety of Technologies Contributing to “Reading to Learn” Literacy Goals The participants will circulate among three different stations. • Spruce Room, Station 1: Knowledge Forum, which allows users to create a knowledge-building community. Each community creates its own database in which to store notes, connect ideas, and tackle complex problem solving. The note-taking, searching, and organizational features of this sophisticated tool allow any type of community to build knowledge. • Maple Room, Station 2: Little Planet Literacy Series, developed in collaboration with Vanderbilt University’s Learning Technology Center, an interdisciplinary group involved in state of the art cognitive research on learning with technology. The series involves “Anchored Instruction,” which is a multi-sensory approach. Anchored Instruction works for students with a wide variety of abilities, including those with very limited literacy skills. Students accomplish a series of tasks revolving around the context of a single story or “Anchor Story” by collaborative or individual effort. By revising the story and sharing the common knowledge of the Anchor Story, students become successful readers and writers. • Oak Room, Station 3: WebQuest—WebQuest is an inquiry-oriented activity in which most or all of the information used by learners is drawn from the Web. WebQuests are designed to use learners’ time well, to focus on using information rather than looking for it, and to support learners’ thinking at the levels of analysis, synthesis and evaluation. 11:45 Break and Shift to Breakout Group Discussions About Technology Presentations What was impressive about the demonstrated technologies? What seemed to be their limitations? Group A1: Oak Room North Group A2: Sequoia Room Group C: Spruce Room Group D: Maple Room 1:00 pm Break for Lunch

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1:30 During Lunch, Randy J. Hinrichs, Group Research Manager, Learning Sciences and Technology at Microsoft Research will report the roadmapping work of the Learning Federation. 2:00 Improving Middle School Science Joseph Krajcik, University of Michigan Professor Krajcik will share an overview of challenges to improving middle school science as a contextual foundation for viewing the subsequent technology demonstrations. Joseph Krajcik is professor of science education in the School of Education at the University of Michigan and a member of the Center for Highly Interactive Computing in Education. His work during the past ten years has focused on working with teachers in science classrooms to bring about sustained change. Working closely with colleagues, he has endeavored to create classrooms that focus on students collaborating to find solutions to important intellectual questions that subsume essential curriculum standards and use new technologies as productivity tools. His goal is to create classroom environments where students are actively doing the intellectual work. He recently published a book with Charlene Czerniak and Carl Berger titled Teaching Children Science: A Project-based Approach, intended for use in elementary and middle school methods. 2:30 General Overview of Each Technology Station (5 minute limit) Douglas Kirkpatrick and Marcia Linn, WISE Elliot Soloway, University of Michigan Kevin Aylesworth, iPaq Probeware 2:45 Break and Groups of 20 Shift to View the Technology Stations 3:00 Three Stations Showcasing a Variety of Technologies Contributing to Improving Science Pedagogy The participants will circulate among three different stations. • Spruce Room, Station 1: Web-Based Inquiry Science Environment (WISE) is a free on-line science learning environment for students in grades 4-12. In WISE, students work on inquiry projects on topics such as genetically modified foods, earthquake prediction, and the deformed frogs mystery. Students learn about and respond to contemporary scientific controversies through designing, debating, and critiquing solutions, all via the Web.

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  • Oak Room, Station 3: Science Laboratory, The Center for Highly Interactive Computing in Education (hi-ce) focuses on interdisciplinary research on technology and systemic educational reform, especially in the areas of technology and innovative science curriculum projects where thousands of students and teachers in K-12 urban school districts learn science concepts and scientific inquiry processes. • Maple Room, Station 3: New Probeware for iPaq Handhelds, demonstrating how one can use modeling and probeware on handheld computers in chemistry, biology, physics. 4:00 Break and Shift to Breakout Group Discussions About Technology Presentations 4:15 Breakout Group Discussions About Technology Presentations   What was impressive about the demonstrated technologies? What seemed to be their limitations?   Group A1: Oak Room North Group A2: Sequoia Room Group C: Spruce Room Group D: Maple Room 5:30 Break 5:45 Breakout Group Report Back 5:45-6:00 Group A1 6:00-6:15 Group A2 6:15-6:30 Group B 6:30-7:00 Group C 7:00-7:15 Concluding Remarks Roy Pea and Wm. A. Wulf, ILIT cochairs 7:15 Reception and Dinner DECEMBER 2001 WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS Roy Pea (Cochair), Stanford University Wm. A. Wulf (Cochair), National Academy of Engineering Alice Agogino, University of California, Berkeley

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David Alexander, Cisco Learning Systems Barbara Allen, Lemon Grove School District Sara Armstrong, The George Lucas Educational Foundation J. Myron Atkin, Stanford University Mark Atkinson, Teachscape Kevin Aylesworth, National Research Council Clarence Bakken, Gunn High School, Palo Alto, California Stephen Barley, Stanford University Linda Chaput, Agile Mind Milton Chen, The George Lucas Educational Foundation Edward R. Dieterle II, Northwestern High School, College Park, Maryland Bernard Dodge, San Diego State University David Dwyer, Apple Computer Louis Gomez, Northwestern University Randal Harrington, The Harker School Randy Hinrichs, Microsoft Research Lab Terry K. Holmer, National Research Council Chuck House, Intel Yasmin Kafai, University of California, Los Angeles Amy Jo Kim, NAIMA Douglas Kirkpatrick, University of California, Berkeley Joseph Krajcik, University of Michigan Jay B. Labov, National Research Council Marsha Lamb, Cisco Learning Institute Tom Landauer, University of Colorado Edward D. Lazowska, University of Washington Herbert Lin, National Research Council Marcia C. Linn, University of California, Berkeley Charles Lynn, San Antonio Elementary, San Jose, California Kathleen Luchini, University of Michigan William Mark, SRI International Sue Marshall, University of California, Irvine Miriam Masullo, IBM Florence McGinn, GKE Karen Mendalow, Exploratorium John Mergendoller, Buck Institute for Education David Messerschmitt, University of California at Berkeley Jim Minstrell, Talaria Inc. Eric Muller, Exploratorium Steve Nelson, Sun Microsystems Nancy Nien, Alum Rock Union School District, Sunnyvale, California Nancy Pang, Alum Rock Union School District, Sunnyvale, California

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James Pellegrino, University of Illinois, Chicago Harold Pratt, President-elect, National Science Teachers Association Gail Pritchard, National Research Council Chris Quintana, University of Michigan Randall E. Raymond, Detroit Public Schools Timothy Ready, National Research Council Jeremy Roschelle, SRI International Nora Sabelli, SRI International Bill Sandoval, University of California, Los Angeles Marlene Scardamalia, University of Toronto Jane F. Schielack, Texas A&M University Marshall S. Smith, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Jim Spohrer, IBM Almaden Doug Sprunger, National Research Council Mark Svorinic, Cisco Learning Systems Chris Teplovs, University of Toronto Louis Tornatzky, Tomas Rivera Policy Institute Uri Treisman, University of Texas at Austin Michael Turturice, McClintock High School, Tempe, Arizona Lucia Vega, San Antonio Elementary, San Jose, California David Vogt, Brainium Technologies Adam Wieczorek, University of Michigan Linda S. Wilson, International SEMATECH Tina Winters, National Research Council JANUARY 2003 WORKSHOP AGENDA Planning for Two Transformations in Educational and Learning Technology Workshop of the Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology (ILIT) Monday, January 20, 2003 The National Academies 500 Fifth Street, NW, Room 100 Washington, DC 8:00 am Continental Breakfast 8:30-8:45 Purposes, Outcomes and Introductions

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  • Description of previous exploratory planning effort by ILIT committee involving learning researchers, teachers, and industry representatives, using roadmapping techniques • Commitment of the National Academies to an ongoing role in encouraging the effective use of educational and learning technology   Wm. A. Wulf, National Academy of Engineering Michael Feuer, National Research Council Roy Pea, Stanford University 8:45-10:15 The First Transformation: Integrating Cheap, Fast, Robust Computers into Instruction for Every Student in America • Reducing cost of ownership • Preparing teachers with adequate professional development • Providing access to educational software linked to standards • Involving parents and providing home access • Who needs to be involved to make it happen • The impact on learning   Speakers: Barbara Allen, LemonLINK Darryl LaGace, LemonLINK Steve Rappaport, Advanced Networks and Services   Comments: Cheryl Lemke, Metiri Group Wanda Bussey, Teacher Advisory Council Geneva Henry, Rice University Moderator: Edward Dieterle, Harvard University 10:15-10:30 Break 10:30-12:00 Interactive Discussion: What Are the Two Key Enablers of the First Transformation?   Step 1: Breakout groups elaborate possible answers in such areas as: • Promotion of the vision • Research demonstrating effectiveness • Push by industry • Changes in teacher education and professional development • Changes in local, state or national education policy • Funding   Step 2: Participants individually review answers of the different breakout groups and identify their own choices for key enablers

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  Step 3: Discussion of the leading candidates for key enablers Moderator: Martha Darling 12:00-12:45 Lunch and Completion of Discussion of First Transformation 12:45-2:15 The Second Transformation: Combining Advances in the Science of Learning with IT Capabilities to Dramatically Improve Student Learning   Research • Vision for the next generation of educational software and its potential impact on learning • What research is necessary to develop techniques further and to demonstrate effectiveness   Development • What development is necessary to scale up these approaches to be used in all schools • What institutional and financing models are necessary to produce this development   Speakers: Roy Pea, Stanford University Louis Gomez, Northwestern University James Pellegrino, University of Illinois at Chicago Edward Lazowska, University of Washington Robert Tinker, Concord Consortium   Comments: Nora Sabelli, SRI International David Vogt, New Media Innovation Center 2:15-2:30 Break 2:30-4:00 Interactive Discussion: Assuming That the Infrastructure of the First Transformation Is in Place, What Are the Two Key Enablers for the Second Transformation?   Step 1: Breakout groups elaborate possible answers in such areas as: • Promotion of the vision • Push by the research community • Preliminary research demonstrating effectiveness • Funding for research • Institutional changes to promote educational software development • Changes in local, state or national education policy to encourage adoption

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  Step 2: Participants individually review answers of the different breakout groups and identify their own choices for key enablers Step 3: Discussion of the leading candidates for key enablers Moderator: Martha Darling 4:00-5:00 Comments and Discussion: How Can the National Academies Partner with Teachers, Industry, Learning Researchers, and Policy Groups to Help Bring About These Two Transformations?   Comments: Milton Goldberg, National Alliance of Business Marshall Smith, Hewlett Foundation Terry Rogers, Advanced Network and Services   Moderator: Wm. A. Wulf, National Academy of Engineering JANUARY 2003 WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS Roy Pea (Cochair), Stanford University Wm. A. Wulf (Cochair), National Academy of Engineering Jason Adsit, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education Barbara Allen, Lemon Grove School District Bobbie Baird, Texas Instruments David Barnes, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Larry Berger, Wireless Generation Corey Brady, Texas Instruments Wanda Bussey, Rufus King High School Richard A. Chase, Learning Pathways, Inc. Martha Darling, Education Consultant Edward R. Dieterle II, Harvard University Stuart W. Elliott, National Research Council Michael Feuer, National Research Council Ann Lee Flynn, National School Boards Association David Fulker, National Science Digital Library Milton Goldberg, National Alliance of Business Louis Gomez, Northwestern University Sara Hall, State Educational Technology Directors Association Geneva Henry, Rice University Michael Hill, National Association of State Boards of Education Terry K. Holmer, National Research Council Henry Kelly, Federation of American Scientists D. Midian Kurland, Scholastic Education

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Jay Labov, National Research Council Darryl LaGace, Lemon Grove School District Edward D. Lazowska, University of Washington Cheryl Lemke, Metiri Group Miriam Masullo, Information Technology Consultant Steve McClung, Glencoe McGraw-Hill Ray Myers, U.S. Department of Education James W. Pellegrino, University of Illinois at Chicago Louis Pugliese, OnCourse Steve Rappaport, Advanced Network and Services Terence W. Rogers, Advanced Network and Services Nora H. Sabelli, SRI International Mark Schneiderman, Software & Information Industry Association Marshall S. Smith, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Larry Snowhite, Houghton Mifflin Company Kendall Starkweather, International Technology Education Association Timothy Stroud, American Federation of Teachers Anna Sumner, International Technology Education Association Robert Tinker, Concord Consortium Kristan Van Hook, Partnership for 21st Century Skills David Vogt, New Media Innovation Center Ken Whang, National Science Foundation Gerry Wheeler, National Science Teachers Association Linda Wilson, International SEMATECH