Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Roy Pea (Cochair) is professor of education and the learning sciences at Stanford University and co-director of the Stanford Center for Innovations in Learning. His work is devoted to exploring, defining, and researching new issues in how information technologies can fundamentally support and advance learning and teaching, with particular focus on topics in science, mathematics, and technology education. Particular areas of interest are computer-supported collaborative and on-line community learning, uses of digital video for learning research and teacher education, scientific visualization, and pervasive learning with wireless handheld computers. He was a member of the committee that produced the National Research Council volume, How People Learn. He was director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International (1996-2001) and John Evans professor of education and the learning sciences at Northwestern University (1991-1996), where he served as dean of the School of Education and Social Policy. He is a member of the National Academy of Education and a fellow of the American Psychological Society and the World Technology Network. He has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes scholar.

Wm. A. Wulf (Cochair) is currently on leave from the University of Virginia to serve as president of the National Academy of Engineering. At the University of Virginia, he is a university professor and holds the AT&T chair in engineering and applied science. During 1988-1990, he was on



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Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Roy Pea (Cochair) is professor of education and the learning sciences at Stanford University and co-director of the Stanford Center for Innovations in Learning. His work is devoted to exploring, defining, and researching new issues in how information technologies can fundamentally support and advance learning and teaching, with particular focus on topics in science, mathematics, and technology education. Particular areas of interest are computer-supported collaborative and on-line community learning, uses of digital video for learning research and teacher education, scientific visualization, and pervasive learning with wireless handheld computers. He was a member of the committee that produced the National Research Council volume, How People Learn. He was director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International (1996-2001) and John Evans professor of education and the learning sciences at Northwestern University (1991-1996), where he served as dean of the School of Education and Social Policy. He is a member of the National Academy of Education and a fellow of the American Psychological Society and the World Technology Network. He has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. Wm. A. Wulf (Cochair) is currently on leave from the University of Virginia to serve as president of the National Academy of Engineering. At the University of Virginia, he is a university professor and holds the AT&T chair in engineering and applied science. During 1988-1990, he was on

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leave from the University of Virginia to be assistant director of the National Science Foundation (NSF), where he headed the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE). While at NSF, Wulf was deeply involved in the development of the High Performance Computing and Communication Initiative and in the formative discussions of the proper government role in developing the National Information Infrastructure. Prior to joining the University of Virginia, he founded Tartan Laboratories and served as its chairman and chief executive officer. The technical basis for Tartan Laboratories was research he conducted while he was professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon. Barbara Allen, director of LemonLINK, is responsible for implementing the instructional technology initiatives within the school district, providing leadership for the development of the K-8 instructional technology curriculum and the integration of technology across all curriculum areas. A frequent presenter at major conferences throughout the country, she assists others in integrating technology into instruction and implementing strong staff development components. In December 2002, she was named by District Administration magazine as one of the top 25 education technology advocates. Project LemonLINK, a 1997 Technology Innovation Challenge Grant, has received much recognition for innovative approaches to instructional technology, including the ComputerWorld Honors Award (2002), the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce Business Roundtable for Education Award—Best Practices (April 2002), the California School Boards Association Golden Bell Award (December 2001), the Ohana Foundation Leadership in Educational Technology Award (July 2000), the National School Board Journal’s Magna 2000 Award (April 2000), a Smithsonian award (April 2000), the American Association of Superintendents’ Promising Practices Award (March 2000), and Business Week’s Smart Links Award (May 1999). Edward R. Dieterle II is a doctoral candidate at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in the Learning and Teaching area. He was a chemistry teacher at Northwestern High School in Hyattsville, Maryland, during the inception of this committee. He had been a teacher at Northwestern since earning his B.A. in chemistry from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Besides teaching chemistry and advanced placement chemistry, he worked as the school’s webmaster and conducted multiple school and countywide staff development sessions on a variety of topics. After earning his M.S. in technology for educators from Johns Hopkins University, he went on to teach multimedia design and technology integration courses for Johns Hopkins University and Trinity College (Washington, DC). He has written and presented extensively for Maryland

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Public Television’s Teacher Professional Development Institutes and the National Park Service’s Bridging the Watershed Program in the areas of effective technology integration and problem-based learning. He is a two-time winner of the ED’s Oasis’ Master Search. ED’s Oasis is part of Classroom Connect, and the national contest recognizes teachers for classroom lessons that successfully integrate technology into instruction. In fall 2002, he began working toward his doctoral degree, and his current research interests include examining and cultivating learning in electronic learning communities. David Dwyer is the vice president of content development for Apex Learning. Previously, he served as director of education technologies at Apple Computer, Inc. He was charged with developing Apple’s 21st century education vision and product strategy. From 1986 to 1996, Dwyer led the Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) project and was Apple’s distinguished scientist for education. In that capacity he shaped ACOT’s research agenda and built a collaboration with 25 universities that focused on how children learned with computers, on the acquisition of technology skills by teachers, and on innovative uses of emerging technology. The body of work has become a standard in the field. From 1996 to 1999, he was vice president of the education enterprise group at Computer Curriculum Corporation. While there Dwyer developed EdMAP, an award-winning intranet for the unique learning, management, and communication needs of schools. Prior to returning to Apple, he cofounded Edpoint, an education startup aimed at helping parents help their children be more successful in school. Dwyer was also a classroom science teacher for 11 years and was twice recognized as an Outstanding Secondary Educator of America. Dwyer’s work is informed by 30 years of experience as an industry leader, researcher, and educator. He holds a Ph.D. in education from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, where he specialized in educational change and policy. Louis M. Gomez is associate professor of learning sciences and professor of computer science at Northwestern University. He is one of the co-directors of the NSF-sponsored Center for Learning Technologies in Urban Schools. The center is a partnership made up Chicago Public Schools, the Detroit Public Schools, the University of Michigan, and Northwestern University. The center is dedicated to collaborative research and development with urban schools that will bring the current state of the art in computing and networking technologies into pervasive use in schools so that they will integrally support science and other curriculum. His primary interest is in working with school communities to create curriculum that supports school reform while connecting schools to broad

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communities of practice beyond school. Prior to joining the faculty at Northwestern, Gomez was director of Human-Computer Systems Research at Bellcore in Morristown, New Jersey. At Bellcore, he pursued an active research program investigating techniques that improve human use of information retrieval systems and techniques that aid in the acquisition of complex computer-based skills. He has a B.A. in psychology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of California at Berkeley. Amy Jo Kim is vice president for social architecture at There, a web-based gaming company. Prior to her current position, she founded and was creative director of Naima, a company in El Granada, California, that designs cutting-edge on-line environments for web communities. Prior to founding Naima, she was an interface architect with Sun Microsystems. She is a leading specialist in web community design, with a deep and diverse background in client-server engineering, multimedia interface design, and on-line gaming environments. She has a Ph.D. in behavioral neuroscience from the University of Washington. Edward D. Lazowska holds the Bill and Melinda Gates chair in computer science at the University of Washington. Lazowska received a B.A. from Brown University in 1972 and a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto in 1977. He has been at the University of Washington since that time. His research concerns the design and analysis of distributed and parallel computer systems. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has served on the 4-person technical advisory board for Microsoft Research since its inception in 1991 and was a member of the NRC Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and a chair of the Computing Research Association and of the Advisory Committee of the NSF Committee for Information Science. He is a leader in the Learning Federation, a group concerned with using information technology to improve learning at the college level, and a trustee of Lakeside School, a coeducational independent school in Seattle. Miriam Masullo retired from the systems laboratory at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center of IBM and recently ran for Congress. She received M.Phil. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from the City University of New York. She has 16 years experience in systems analysis and network engineering from the telecommunications industry. For several years, she worked with the American Association for the Advancement of Science on Project 2061. Recently, she has focused on EduPort as a possible model

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for the education component of the National Information Infrastructure (NII). Masullo organized and conducted the first workshop on the Role of Digital Libraries for K-12 Education. She has worked all over the world, particularly with UNESCO, to influence the development of infrastructure for K-12 education. In 1997, she was named New York City’s business educator of the year by the City College of New York Alumni Association and the Rockefeller Group. She recently served at the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering as director of educational technology and was honored as “a woman who makes a difference” with a technology award at the Women of Color Technology Awards Conference. She is a member of the NRC’s Mathematical Sciences Education Board. James Pellegrino is distinguished professor of cognitive psychology and education at the University of Illinois-Chicago, where he also serves as co-director of the Center for the Study of Learning, Instruction and Teacher Development. Prior to assuming his current positions, he was Frank W. Mayborn professor of cognitive studies at Vanderbilt University and dean of Vanderbilt’s Peabody College of Education and Human Development (1992-1998). He also served as co-director of the Learning Technology Center at Peabody (1989-1992). He has a B.A. from Colgate University with a major in psychology and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in experimental and cognitive psychology from the University of Colorado. His service at the National Research Council has been extensive. He has served as chair of the NRC’s Committee on the Evaluation of National and State Assessments of Educational Progress, cochair of the Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice, and co-chair of the Committee on the Foundations of Assessment. He currently serves as chair of the Panel on Learning and Instruction for the Committee on the Strategic Educational Research Partnership and is a member of the Board on Testing and Assessment. Louis Pugliese is an experienced education business executive with a long track record of management success at some of the nation’s most successful educational technology product and service companies. As chief executive officer of Blackboard Inc., he oversaw the company’s operations and long-term strategic direction, shaping a high-growth, diversified business that has gained international recognition as a leader in on-line education. Before joining Blackboard, he served as vice president and chief operating officer of the education division of ETC, a subsidiary of Denver-based Telecommunications Inc. (TCI). Prior to joining ETC, he was director of marketing and sales with Scholastic New Media in New York, and vice president of Turner Educational Services in Atlanta. There, he successfully launched CNN Newsroom and a variety of educational ventures in K-12

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and higher education, specifically in Internet and distance education-based content. He is a member of the Education Board for the Software Information Industry Association and the Commission on Technology and Adult Learning. In April 2000, he testified at a hearing before the congressional web-based education committee chaired by Senator Bob Kerrey (R-Nebraska). Marshall S. Smith is the director of the education program at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Prior to joining the foundation, he was professor of education in the School of Education at Stanford University. Smith was undersecretary and acting deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Education during the Clinton administration. He trained originally in statistical techniques for research and acquired extensive knowledge of policy issues through his years of government and academic experience. This experience has included key positions in government education policy during the 1970s and 1990s; lead roles as researcher on topics including computer analysis of social science data, early child education, critical thinking, and social inequality; teaching positions at Harvard, Wisconsin, and Stanford Universities; and six years as dean of the School of Education at Stanford. With this broad background, he is able to integrate research on policy questions from several disciplines and to focus on educational process, whether at the level of the individual student in the classroom or at the level of state and national educational reform. He is a member of the National Academy of Education and a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford. He was chair and principal investigator at the Pew Forum on Educational Reform; member of the National Council on Education Standards and Testing (a congressionally mandated council); and chair of the Subcommittee on Educational Standards. His NRC service includes serving as chair of the Board of International Comparative Studies in Education and as a member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. He has an Ed.D. in measurement and statistics from Harvard University (1970). David Vogt is vice president for technology and chief research officer at the New Media Innovation Center (NewMIC) in Vancouver, British Columbia. NewMIC conducts collaborative, precompetitive R&D in the social dynamics of new media technologies with such companies as Sony, Electronic Arts, IBM, and Nortel. Prior to his current position, he was founder and chief products officer at Brainium Technologies. Brainium is an innovative e-learning company specializing in immersive on-line curriculum content and wireless devices for K-12 markets. He began his career as director of observatories at the University of British Columbia

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(UBC) and then as director of western Canada’s largest public science center. With the development in 1993 of a virtual science center to support educational outreach, he changed his focus to pioneer human experience in new media environments. He has a Ph.D. in information science, combining computer science, mathematics, archaeology, and astrophysics. He currently also holds the David Robitaille chair in technology applications to math and science education at UBC. Barbara Watkins is the chief education officer for the Chicago Public Schools. Prior to receiving her doctorate from Loyola University, she was principal of the James McCosh School in Chicago. Her teaching career in Chicago spanned 11 years; during that time she taught all grades K-5 and developed several programs to promote parental involvement. Her leadership style promotes creativity and collaboration among the staff and school community. As a result, several unique programs and school-community partnerships have evolved. She developed the Science Technology Integrated Project, in which Chicago-area universities and schools collaborate to create technology-based science units for children. The project won a Pioneering Partners Foundation Award in 1999. She graduated from Chicago State University with a M.A. in educational administration and later continued her studies at the University of Chicago. Linda Steele Wilson is the information manager and managing editor for the International Technology Roadmaps for Semiconductors (ITRS). She is also the managing editor for International SEMATECH’s 5-year strategic plan. As manager of the roadmap department at International SEMATECH since 1994, her responsibilities include supervising the effort to produce the semiconductor industry’s 15-year technology requirements forecast and serving as the publishing manager of the ITRS for the Semiconductor Industry Association. She also serves as recording secretary for the executive International Roadmap Committee for the ITRS and is on the editorial board for that committee. The roadmap efforts became global in 1998; she oversees the internationally held meetings and public conferences that are held annually to develop and present this industry forecast. The global industry roadmapping includes the regions of Europe, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and the United States. Before joining International SEMATECH, she attained a broad background in the semiconductor industry assignments in manufacturing operations, process engineering and R&D, and research consortium activities, with a focus on failure analysis in chip test and packaging. She graduated from St. Edwards University with a B.A. in English and has worked the last 2 years with George Mason University on the study of industry roadmapping.