Appendixes



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Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay Appendixes

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Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS James Anderson (Co-Chair) is a Professor in the Department of Environmental and Natural Resource Economics at the University of Rhode Island. Dr. Anderson earned his Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics in 1983 from the University of California, Davis. His research is in the area of fisheries and aquaculture economics. He has worked on bioeconomic interactions between aquaculture and the common property salmon fishery and, currently, the relationship between the seafood market and environmental policies and regulation. Dr. Anderson is the editor of the journal Marine Resource Economics. He served on a previous NRC Committee on the Assessment of Technology and Opportunities for Marine Aquaculture. Dennis Hedgecock (Co-Chair) is a Professor at the Bodega Marine Laboratory of the University of California, Davis. He earned his Ph.D. in 1974 from University of California, Davis, in the field of genetics. Dr. Hedgecock is a leading scientist in oyster aquaculture and genetics, though his research covers broadly the population, quantitative, evolutionary, and conservation genetics of marine fish and shellfish. His current research subjects are Pacific oysters and Pacific salmon. He is a former member of the U.S. GLOBEC Scientific Steering Committee. Mark Berrigan is the Chief of the Bureau of Aquaculture Development, Division of Aquaculture, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. He earned his M.S. in marine biology and his B.S. in

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Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay biology from the University of West Florida. He has broad experience in aquaculture, shellfisheries and multi-dimensional resource management. He is responsible for comprehensive aquacultural development and shellfish resource management in Florida, including the oyster restoration program, aquaculture certification program, and the sovereignty submerged land aquaculture leasing program. Keith Criddle is head of the Department of Economics at Utah State University. Dr. Criddle earned his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of California, Davis in 1989. His research focuses on the intersection between the natural sciences and economics. He is interested in the management of living resources, particularly fisheries. Dr. Criddle is an associate editor for Marine Resource Economics. He has served on the North Pacific Fishery Management Council’s Scientific and Statistical Committee since 1993 and was a member of the NRC Committee to Review Individual Fishing Quotas. William Dewey works as the Division Manager of project development and public affairs at Taylor Shellfish Company. Mr. Dewey earned his B.S. in shellfish biology and fisheries management at the University of Washington, School of Fisheries in 1981. He recently graduated from the Washington Agriculture and Forestry Education Foundation 2-year leadership training program (Class XIX). During his twenty years as a shellfish farmer, Mr. Dewey has taken an active role in the industry, working on water quality issues, health, and farming regulations. He has also served on the Board of Directors of People for Puget Sound and was appointed to the Puget Sound Council in 1996 by Washington Governor Lowry. Mr. Dewey is currently the President of the Pacific Shellfish Institute and serves on the Board of Directors of the National Aquaculture Association and the Interstate Shellfish Sanitation Conference. Susan Ford is Research Professor Emerita in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences at Rutgers University. Dr. Ford earned her Ph.D. from Duke University in zoology in 1984. She is a pathobiologist with experience in the field of shellfish diseases. Her field of interest are invertebrate pathology/ parasitology, genetics and mechanisms of resistance to pathogens at the Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory. She specializes in the oyster diseases caused by Haplosporidium nelsoni (MSX) and Perkinsus marinus (Dermo). Her research has encompassed projects at the molecular, whole animal, and population level, including numerical modeling of the host-parasite relationship. Philippe Goulletquer is the Director of the Laboratory of Shellfish Genetics and Pathology at l’institut francais de recherche pour l’exploitation

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Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay de la mer (IFREMER). Dr. Goulletquer received his Ph.D. from the University of Western Brittany, France in 1989. His dissertation research was in the field of aquaculture and fisheries. His current research is on aquaculture of Crassoaatrea gigas and ecosystem management in France. Previously, Dr. Goulletquer worked at France’s National Laboratory for Mariculture Ecosystems and as an Assistant Research Scientist at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory of the University of Maryland. He has served on the ICES Working Group on Introduction and Transfers of Marine Organisms (ITMO) and the Mariculture Committee. Dr. Goulletquer was Co-Chair of the Ad Hoc Technical expert group on the Mariculture impacts on biodiversity for the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Richard Hildreth is Professor and Co-Director at the Ocean and Coastal Law Center, School of Law, University of Oregon. Dr. Hildreth received his B.S.E in 1965 and his J.D. in 1968, both from the University of Michigan. He specializes in ocean and coastal law, property, international environmental law, land-use law, and water resources law. Prior to teaching, he practiced business law with Steinhart & Falconer in San Francisco. He is a co-author of the law school textbook Coastal and Ocean Law. He is on the editorial advisory board of the journal Ocean Development & International Law. Dr. Hildreth has served on a previous NRC Committee on the Coastal Ocean. Michael Paolisso is an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland in the Department of Anthropology. He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1985. Dr. Paolisso’s research includes applied anthropology, environment and pollution, environmental anthropology, and economic anthropology. He has studied the anthropology of rural Maryland and the cultural responses to the toxic alga Pfiesteria piscicida. In addition, Dr. Paolisso is currently the principal investigator of a 3-year study funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to study cultural models of pollution and environment. Nancy Targett is a Professor of Marine Biology and Biochemistry at the Graduate College of Marine Studies at the University of Delaware. Dr. Targett earned her Ph.D. in oceanography in 1979 from the University of Maine. Her expertise is in biological oceanography and her research focuses on marine chemical ecology and organismal interactions mediated by naturally occurring metabolites, including: plant/herbivore interactions, predator/prey interactions, detoxification of allelochemicals, chemoattraction, and biofouling. She is an associate editor for the Journal

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Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay of Chemical Ecology and an Aldo Leopold Leadership Program Fellow. From 1994 to 2000, she held an appointment to the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council where she chaired several of their committees. Dr. Targett is currently a member of the Ocean Studies Board and chaired the NRC Committee on Marine Biotechnology. Robert Whitlatch is a Professor of Marine Sciences at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Whitlatch received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1976 in the field of evolutionary biology. Dr. Whitlatch is a benthic ecologist interested in animal-sediment relationships, trophic dynamics of deposit-feeding invertebrates, life history analysis, shellfish ecology, the ecology of invasive species, and community ecology. He has worked extensively on both oyster reef biology and on the ecology of nonnative species in coastal New England. He is a member of the editorial boards for the Journal of Sea Research and Journal of Marine Research and has served on numerous peer review panels for the National Science Foundation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL STAFF Susan Roberts is a Senior Program Officer for the National Research Council’s Ocean Studies Board. Dr. Roberts received her Ph.D. in marine biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She has directed a number of studies including Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters (2003), Effects of Trawling & Dredging on Seafloor Habitat (2002), Marine Protected Areas: Tools for Sustaining Ocean Ecosystems (2001), Bridging Boundaries Through Regional Marine Research (2000), and From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean’s Role in Human Health (1999). Dr. Roberts’ research interests include marine microbiology, fish physiology, and marine biotechnology. Kim Waddell is a Senior Program Officer in the National Research Council’s Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources. Dr. Waddell received a B.A. in environmental studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz and his Ph.D. in Biology from the University of South Carolina. He has directed the NRC studies The Future Role of Pesticides in U.S. Agriculture (2000), Professional Societies and Ecologically Based Pest Management (2000), Environmental Effects of Transgenic Plants: The Scope and Adequacy of Regulation (2002), and Animal Biotechnology: Science-based Concerns (2002). His current projects include two new studies “Biological Confinement of Genetically Engineered Organisms” and “California Research Priorities for Pierce’s Disease.” Dr. Waddell’s research interests

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Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay include insect ecology and evolution, agricultural biotechnology, and sustainable agriculture. Denise Greene is a Senior Project Assistant at the Ocean Studies Board and has 9 years of experience working for the National Research Council and National Academies. Mrs. Greene has been involved with studies on Marine Biotechnology, Environmental Information for Naval Warfare, and Defining Best Available Science for Fisheries Management. Sarah Capote is a Project Assistant with the National Research Council’s Ocean Studies Board. She earned her B.A. in history from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.