Epizootic

a transient disease event in an animal population.

Eutrophication

nutrient enrichment of water bodies, generally referring to elevated levels of nitrogen and phosphorus.


Host

organism in which a parasite or other infectious agent lives.


Infection

presence of a parasite in a host, with or without the development of disease.

Invasive species

a nonindigenous organism that spreads from the site of introduction, becomes abundant, and may displace native species.


Mosaic

animal containing both diploid and triploid cells.


Nominal value

value in current dollars.

Nonindigenous

species found outside its natural geographical range. Also referred to as alien, nonnative, or exotic.


Pathogen

disease-producing organism.


Real price –

nominal price adjusted for inflation.

Reversion

production of normal diploid cells in an otherwise triploid animal.

Rogue introduction

a non-sanctioned, direct release of diploid reproductive oysters.


Sed quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

Latin phrase translated as: “Who is to guard the guards themselves?”

Seed

a young oyster, especially one suitable for transplanting to another bed.

Skipjacks

sail-powered wooden vessels native to the Chesapeake Bay that are used for commercial dredging of oysters.

Sociocultural

learned knowledge, values and behaviors that are shared among members of a group, community or region.

Spat

juvenile oysters from the time of settlement through the first year of growth.



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