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E Biographies of Workshop Speakers James G. Anderson is Philip S. Weld Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry at Harvard University. He received his B.S. in physics from the University of Washington and his Ph.D. in physics-astrogeophysics from the University of Colorado. His research addresses three domains within physical chemistry: (1) chemical reactivity viewed from the microscopic perspective of electron struc- ture, molecular orbitals, and reactivities of radical-radical and radical-molecule systems; (2) chemical catalysis sustained by free-radical chain reactions that dic- tate the macroscopic rate of chemical transformation in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere; and (3) mechanistic links between chemistry, radiation, and dynamics in the atmosphere that control climate. Studies are carried out both in the laboratory, where elementary processes can be isolated, and within natural systems, in which reaction networks and transport patterns are dissected by estab- lishing cause and effect using simultaneous, in situ detection of free radicals, reactive intermediates, and long-lived tracers. Professor Anderson is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Thomas W. Asmus is a senior research executive at DaimlerChrysler Cor- poration. He is the corporate adviser on powertrain technologies and key corpo- rate technical representative in industry-government joint technical activities. He represents most of the research activities at the Chrysler Group. He has been involved in many facets of engine R&D activities including energy management systems, alternative engines, emissions control, and fuel economy improvement for nearly 30 years. Dr. Asmus is a Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) fellow and received the 1999 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Soichiro Honda Lecture Award, which was established by ASME to recognize 149

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150 APPENDIX E individual achievement or outstanding contributions in the field of personal trans- portation. Dr. Asmus is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Ruben G. Carbonell is Frank Hawkins Kenan Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University. He is currently direc- tor of the William R. Kenan, Jr., Institute for Engineering, Technology, and Sci- ence at North Carolina State University, codirector of the National Science Foun- dation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes, and director of the Kenan Center for the Utilization of Carbon Dioxide in Manufacturing. His main areas of research include the appli- cation of transport phenomena and colloid and surface science principles to the development of coating, extraction and reaction processes based on carbon diox- ide as a solvent, and affinity chromatographic separation processes for biological molecules using ligands derived from combinatorial libraries. He earned his B.S. in chemical engineering from Manhattan College and Ph.D. in chemical engi- neering from Princeton University. He won the North Carolina State University Alumni Association Outstanding Research Award in 1989; the R.J. Reynolds Award for Excellence in Teaching, Research, and Extension from the North Caro- lina State College of Engineering in 1990; and the Alcoa Outstanding Research Award from the College of Engineering in 2001. Uma Chowdhry is vice president for Central Research and Development (CR&D) at the DuPont Company. She joined DuPont in 1977 as a research scien- tist in CR&D and spent the first 11 years of her career there in various research and management roles. She subsequently served as laboratory director and busi- ness manager in the Electronics Department before moving to the Chemicals Sec- tor as laboratory director of Jackson Lab. From 1993 to 1995, she served as R&D director for Specialty Chemicals and was appointed business director for the DuPont Terathane business in 1995. In 1997, Dr. Chowdhry moved back to Spe- cialty Chemicals as business planning and R&D director. In 1999, she was ap- pointed director of DuPont Engineering's Technology Division. Born and raised in Mumbai, India, she came to the United States in 1968 with a B.S. in physics from the Indian Institute of Science, Mumbai University; she received an M.S. from Caltech in engineering science and a Ph.D. in materials science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Chowdhry is a fellow of the American Ceramic Society and a member of the National Academy of Engineer- ~ng. Barry Dellinger is the Patrick F. Taylor Chair of the Environmental Impact of Treatment of Hazardous Wastes and professor of chemistry at Louisiana State University (LSU). He is the director of the LSU Intercollege Environmental Cooperative and the acting director of the Biodynamics Institute. He is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Science Advisory Board Environmental Engineering Committee. From 1981 to 1998, he was group leader of environmental sciences and engineering at the University of Dayton where he also held a joint faculty appointment. From 1978-1981 he was a senior project

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APPENDIX E 151 scientist at Northrop Services Inc. He holds a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Florida State University and a B.S. in chemistry from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests include origin and control of toxic combustion by-products, thermal treatment of hazardous wastes, pathways of for- mation of dioxins, gas-phase and surface-catalyzed elementary reaction kinetics, and sources and health impacts of environmentally persistent free radicals. He is a recipient of the Charles A. Lindberg Certificate of Merit, the Engineering and Science Foundation Award for Outstanding Professional Achievement, the Wohleben-Hochwald Researcher of the Year Award, the Ohio General Assembly Award for Research Excellence, and corecipient of numerous EPA Science to Achieve Results (STAR) research awards. David A. Dixon is a Battelle fellow in the Fundamental Science Directorate at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), where he previously served as associate director for theory, modeling, and simulation at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. His main research interest is the use of numerical simulation to solve complex chemical problems with a primary focus on the quantitative prediction of molecular behavior. He uses numerical simulation methods to obtain quantitative results for molecular systems of inter- est to experimental chemists and engineers with a specific focus on the design of new materials and production processes. Before moving to PNNL, he was re- search fellow and research leader in computational chemistry at DuPont Central Research and Development (1983-1995) and a member of the Chemistry Depart- ment at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis (1977-1983~. He earned his B.S. in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from Harvard University, where he served as a junior fellow of the Society of Fellows, Harvard University. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of the American Physi- cal Society. He is a recipient of the 1989 Leo Hendrik Baekeland Award pre- sented by the American Chemical Society, the Federal Laboratory Consortium Technology Transfer Award (2000), and the 2003 American Chemical Society Award for Creative Work in Fluorine Chemistry. William H. Farland is the acting deputy assistant administrator for science in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Of lice of Research and Develop- ment. A member of the government's Senior Executive Service, Dr. Farland's permanent position is director of the EPA's National Center for Environmental Assessment, which has major responsibility for the conduct of chemical specific risk assessments in support of EPA regulatory programs, the development of agency-wide guidance on risk assessment, and the conduct of research to im- prove risk assessment. Dr. Farland began his EPA career in 1979 as a health scientist in the EPA's Office of Toxic Substances, while he continued his re- search endeavors at the George Washington University. His career has been char- acterized by a commitment to the development of national and international ap- proaches to testing and assessment of the fate and effects of environmental agents.

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152 APPENDIX E Dr. Farland has received a number of awards and honors, including an EPA Sil- ver Medal and several Bronze Medals, for this work. Dr. Farland holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in cell biology and bio- chemistry, an M.A. in zoology from the same institution, and a B.S. from Loyola University, Los Angeles. He was awarded an Individual National Research Ser- vice Award from the National Cancer Institute to pursue postdoctoral training in DNA damage and repair at the University of California, Irvine, and at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Janet G. Hering is a professor of environmental science and engineering at Caltech, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1996. Prior to that, she was an assistant and later associate professor of civil and environmental engi- neering at UCLA. She has an A.B. in chemistry from Cornell University, an A.M. in chemistry from Harvard University, and a Ph.D. in oceanography from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology-Woods Hole Oceanographic Institu- tion Joint Program. She has published more than 30 papers in refereed scientific journals and is the coauthor of the book Principles and Applications of Aquatic Chemistry. She is a past recipient of the National Science Foundation's Young Investigator Award and Presidential Faculty Fellows Award and is a member of the editorial advisory board for the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Professor Hering's research interests include the biogeochemical cycling of trace elements in natural waters and water treatment technologies for the removal of inorganic contaminants from potable water. Her research includes both labora- tory and field experimental studies and has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Water Works Association Research Foundation, California Sea Grant, the Petroleum Research Foundation, the University of California Water Resources Center, the Chevron Research and Technology Company, and the Metropolitan Water Dis- trict of Southern California. Charles E. Kolb is president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Re- search, Inc. Since joining Aerodyne as a senior research scientist in 1971, his personal areas of research have included atmospheric and environmental chemis- try, combustion chemistry, chemical lasers, materials chemistry, and the chemi- cal physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes. He is the author or coauthor of more than 150 archival publications in these fields. In the area of atmospheric and environmental chemistry, Dr. Kolb initiated Aerodyne' s programs for the identi- fication and quantification of sources and sinks of trace atmospheric gases and aerosols involved in regional and global pollution problems, as well as the devel- opment of spectral sensing techniques to quantify soil pollutants. He has also developed models of aircraft and rocket exhaust plume-wake chemical kinetics, condensation physics, and dispersion processes critical to the systematic assess- ment of the impact of aerospace systems on the chemical structure of the upper troposphere and stratosphere. Dr. Kolb received the 1997 Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology from the American Chemi-

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APPENDIX E 153 cat Society. He has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has served as the atmospheric sciences editor of the journal Geophysics Research Letters (1995-1999~. Frangois M.M. Morel is Albert G. Blanke Professor of Geosciences at Princeton University, where he is also director of the Princeton Environmental Institute and director of the Center in Environmental BioInorganic Chemistry. He received the Licence-es-Sciences in Mathematiques Appliquees at the Universite de Grenoble, the Diplome d'Ingenieur from Universite de Grenoble, and a Ph.D. in engineering sciences from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. The main focus of his research is the interactions between aquatic microorgan- isms and their chemical milieu, with the goal of understanding the biogeochemi- cal cycles of elements, particularly trace elements, and their ecological conse- quences at the local or global scale. The relationship between aquatic microorganisms and trace metals, some of which are necessary for growth and some of which are toxic, is important for the ecology of plankton, the environ- mental consequences of metal pollution, and the possible control of primary pro- duction. At present, he is particularly interested in testing the so-called iron and zinc hypotheses, which, if true, could have important consequences for the effi- ciency of CO2 sequestration by the oceans and, hence, for the global carbon cycle. Michael K. Stern is senior science fellow and director of technology, agri- cultural chemistry, at Monsanto Company. He joined Monsanto in of 1989 as a senior research chemist in the Metal Mediated Chemistry Group of Monsanto Corporate Research and was appointed science fellow in 1993 and senior science fellow in 1999. During his tenure at Monsanto, Dr. Stern has been actively in- volved in a variety of research programs relating to the development of novel chemical processes and pharmaceuticals. He was the recipient of the Monsanto Thomas and Hochwalt Science and Technology Award in 1993 for his role in the discovery of the aromatic substitution chemistry used in the development of Monsanto's new process to manufacture 4-aminodiphenylamine (4-ADPA) and received the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award for this process tech- nology in 1998. He graduated from Denison University with a B.S. in chemistry. He received an M.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Princeton University. He was a postdoctoral associate in the De- partment of Chemistry at MIT before joining Monsanto. Dr. Stern is the author of 24 scientific publications and the inventor on 24 U.S. Patents. Mark H. Thiemens is dean of the Division of Physical Sciences and profes- sor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Cali- fornia, San Diego (UCSD). He received his B.S. from the University of Miami and his Ph.D. from Florida State University. He joined the faculty at UCSD after serving as a postdoctoral fellow at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago. He has received an Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, the E.O. Lawrence Award from the U.S. Department of Energy in 1999, and the Chancel-

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154 APPENDIX E lors Associates Award for Excellence in Research from UCSD in 2001. He was named Chancellors Associates chair in 1999 and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research is focused on measurement of stable isotope variations at ultrahigh precision to develop experimental programs in widely varying research fields that include atmospheric chemistry (aerosol and greenhouse gas studies), the evolution of life and the atmosphere, the physical chemistry of gas-phase photochemical reactions, early solar system history and Mars atmospherics (meteorite measurements), and gas-solid conversion mecha- nisms.