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APPENDIX A Co mmiffee on fle National Ecological Observatory ATefwork Biographical Sketches Chair G. David TiLnan is Regents Professor and director of the Cedar Creek Natural History Area at the University of Minnesota. He received his PhD in 1976 from the University of Michigan. His honors include Guggenheim Fellow (1984), Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1995), Pew Scholar in Conservation Biology (1995), and the Eco- Togical Society of America's Cooper (1989) and MacArthur (1996) Awards. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Editorial Board. His field experiments and theory explore how competition, biodiversity and global change drivers influence community and ecosystem patterns and processes. In 2001 he was designated the most highly cited environ- mental scientist for the decade (1990-2000) by the Institute for Scientific Information. 97

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NEON: ADDRESSING THE NATION'S ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES John D. Aber is professor and director of the Complex Systems Research Center at the University of New Hampshire. He received his BS in Engineering and Applied Science, and MS and PhD in forestry and environmental studies from Yale University. His work focuses on ecosystem modeling of the effects of environmental factors on forest production and nutrient cycling. He is particularly interested in nitrogen cycling and the process of nitrogen saturation in forests in response to acid deposition. Dr. Aber has served as an associate editor for Biogeo- chemistry, Trees: Structure and Function, the Canadian Journal of Forest Research, and the journal of NearInfrared Reflectance Spectroscopy and as a member of the technical review team for the Irish Critical Loads Program. Joy M. Bergelson is Associate Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at the University of Chicago. She graduated summa cum laude with a RI:ScB in Biology and obtained her master's and PhD from the University of York, UK and University of Washington, respectively. In 1993, she received the Young Investigator Award from the American Society of Naturalists and the Presidential Faculty Fellow Award. The research in her laboratory focuses primarily on the ecology and evolution of plant resistance traits. She and members of her laboratory combine ecological field experiments with trans~enic manipulations to explore the 0 1 fitness effects and selective histories of particular resistance genes. In addition, she maintains a broad interest in plant population biology and is involved in projects on weed invasiveness, plant population dynamics, plant quantitative genetics, and global environment change in natural and experimental systems. Carol I. Fialkowski is conservation education director of the Field Museum of Natural History and an adjunct faculty member in science education at the National-Louis University, Chicago State University and Northeastern Illinois University. Before joining the Field Museum, she served as vice president for education exhibits at the Chicago Acad- emy of Sciences. She obtained her BA in social science from St. Xavier 98

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Appendix A University and her MEd in environmental science from the National- Louis University. She has served on several education steering committees, including the National Biodiversity Educator's Network and the Bio- diversity Project. Dorothy M. Gibb is senior technical director of Horne Engineering Services, Inc. She received her PhD in botany from the University of Georgia and her MSc from the University of London, UK. Dr. Gibb has over 16 years of experience in environmental assessment, natural- resource management, policy analysis, research, analytical design, and project management and execution. The majority of her recent work has been supporting US Department of Defense headquarters organizations and individual military installations in ecosystem management and natural-resources management planning. She has been involved in review and development of natural resources policy and guidance, has been senior author of over 10 integrated natural-resources management plans, (INRMPs), and has recently completed a Web-published natural resources management implementation handbook. Dr. Gibb also has experience with bioaccumulation, biogeochemistry, and ecological risk assessment. John F. Heidelberg is assistant investigator at The Institute for Ge- nomic Research. He served as principal investigator on the Vibrio cholerae genome sequencing project and is the principal investigator on the Shewanella oneidensis (p?~trefaciensJ, Dehalococcoides ethenogenes, Des2~lfoqJibrio vulgaris, and T4-related Vibriophage KVP40 genome sequencing projects. He received his PhD from the University of Maryland, College Park in marine, estuarine, and environmental science. Gretchen E. Hofinann is assistant professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She received her BA from the University of Wyoming, and MS and PhD from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Research in her laboratory focuses on the ecological physiology of marine animals, in particular intertidal invertebrates and perciform fishes. The 99

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NEON: ADDRESSING THE NATION'S ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES . tour main research projects in the Hofmann laboratory are in ecological significance, expression, and function of heat-shock proteins as molecular . chaperones, latitudinal gradients of thermal stress in the intertidal (are species more physiologically stressed at the extremes of their biogeo- graphic range?), patterns of gene expression on a latitudinal scale in marine invertebrates, and evolutionary loss of stress-induced gene expression in Antarctic fishes. Peter I. Hudson is WiDaman Professor of Biology at Pennsylvania State T T . T A- ~ . . ~ ~ . ~ . fin 1- UnlverSlty. IS research interests include the examination ot disease flows through wild animal populations, which individuals are important for transmission, the mechanisms that lead to persistence in the popula- tion, and the consequences of individual infections on host population dynamics. One of his long-term interests has been the sublethal effects of parasites and pathogens on fecundity and their destabilization of host population dynamics. His current work is extending into interspecific interactions between parasites and pathogens in rabbit populations in the UK and mouse populations in Italy. Robert I. Huggett is vice president for research and graduate studies and professor at Michigan State University. From 1994 to 1997, he was the assistant administrator for research and development for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Before that, he chaired the Department of Environmental Sciences of the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences at the College of William and Mary. He has held several other environment related management positions there since 1972, including chairman of the Department of Ecology and Pollution and the Department of Chemical Oceanography in the School of Marine Sciences. He received a doctoral degree in marine science in 1977 from the College of William and Mary, where he also studied as an under- graduate, and a master's degree in marine chemistry in 1986 from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1968. 100

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Appendix A Dennis P. Lettenmaier is a hydrologist in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington, where he joined the faculty in 1976. In addition to his service at the University of Washington, he spent a year as visiting scientist at the US Geological Survey in Reston, VA (1985-1986) and was the Program Manager of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Land Surface Hydrology Program at NASA headquarters in 1997-1998. He is a member and Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS), and a member of the Ameri- can Water Resources Association and the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). He was a recipient of ASCE's Huber Research Prize in 1990, and is the author of over 100 journal articles. He is currently Chief Editor of the AMS journal of Hydrometeorology. Dr. L.ettenmaier's research interests include hydrocTimatology, surface- water hydrology, and geographic information systems and remote sensing. Bobbi S. Low is professor of natural resources and associate director of the Population-Environment Dynamics Program at the University of Michigan. She received her BA in biology from the University of Louisville and her MA and PhD in evolutionary zoology from the University of Texas. Her research interests include evolutionary and behavioral ecology of wildlife species; resource control and reproductive success in vertebrates, including humans; parental strategies in verte- brates; desert ecology and management of arid lands; integration of evolutionary theory and resource management, and resources and repro- . . cuchve variance. Stephen R. Palumbi is a professor at Stanford University. He moved his laboratory from Harvard University in 2002. His research interests are widespread, and he has published on a variety of marine and terrestrial systems, including the genetics and evolution of sea urchins, whales, corals, sharks, spiders, shrimp, bryozoans, and butterflyfishes. He has 101

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NEON: ADDRESSING THE NATION'S ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES also published extensively on uses of genetic techniques in evolutionary and systematic studies, larval ecology and dispersion, and mechanisms of reproductive isolation and their influence on patterns of speciation in marine systems. His book, The Evolution E'cilosion: How Humans Cause Rapid Evolutionary Change was published by Norton in 2001. He earned a PhD in Zoology in 1984 from the University of Washington and received a BA in Biology in 1978 from the Johns Hopkins University in Maryland. He was selected as a Pew Fellow in Marine Conservation in 1996. . Camille Parmesan is an assistant professor at the University of Texas, Austin. She received her PhD in zoology from the University of Texas. For the last several years, the focus of her work has been on current effects of climate change in the 20th century on wildlife. Her work on butterfly range shifts has been highlighted in many scientific and popular press reports, such as those in Science, Science News, the New York Times, the London Times, National Public Radio, and the recent BBC film series State of the Planet with David Attenborough. The intensification of global warming as an international issue led her into the interface of a policy and science. Dr. Parmesan has given seminars in Washington, DC for the White House, government agencies, and such non- government organizations as the World Conservation Union (IUCN) and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF). As a lead author, she was involved in multiple aspects of the Third Assessment Report of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Herman H. Shugart,Jr. is the W.W. Corcoran Professor of Environ- mental Sciences and the director of the Global Environmental Change Program at the University of Virginia. He received his PhD in zoology from the University of Georgia in 1971 and worked for the next 13 years in Tennessee, eventually as a senior research scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and as a professor in botany and the graduate program in ecology at the University of Tennessee. In 1984, he moved to his current position at the University of Virginia. Dr. Shugart has also 102

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Appendix A served as a Visiting Fellow in the Australian National University (1978- 1979 and 1993-1994), in Australia's Commonwealth Industrial and Scientific Research Organization (CSIRO), Division of Land Use Research (1982) and Division of Wildlife and Ecology (1993-1994), in the International Meteorological Institute at the University of Stockholm, Sweden (1984), and in the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, Laxenburg, Austria (1987 and 1989~. He has served on the editorial boards of several scholarly journals including Ecology and Ecological Monographs, Annual Reviews in Ecology and Systematics, Biological Conservation, Landscape Ecology, journal of Vegetation Science, Forest Science, Global Change Biology and The Australian journal of Botany. He is the author of 254 publications, including 11 books, 60 book chapters, and 90 papers in peer-reviewed journals. . . ~ 103

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