Appendix C
Brief Descriptions of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs*

*  

This is an illustrative list of programs. It is not intended as an exhaustive list, nor is it necessarily an endorsement of those programs listed.



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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Appendix C Brief Descriptions of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs* *   This is an illustrative list of programs. It is not intended as an exhaustive list, nor is it necessarily an endorsement of those programs listed.

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Brief Descriptions of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs, Sorted by NIH 2002 Funding Rank for Each Department Institutiona Research Track Mentoring Program No. of FTE Faculty M.D.sb Elective Timec No. of Residentsd Resident Compensation ($1000s)e Other Notes Research Rotation FY2002 NIH Funding ($ millions, rank) PGY1 PGY5 Psychiatry Internal Medicine WPIC (both)1 Y Y Adult: 111 Child: 25 PGY4: <12 mos PGY5: <12 mos Adult: 61 Child: 13 37 42 22 residents are in the targeted research track; 7 T32 fellowships; the Junior Faculty Scholars Program has 8 slots to fund junior faculty 25% of time for 2 years to collect data for grant submissions – the program has yielded 11 career award submissions Optional 77.5(1) 43.6(21) Yale (both)2 Y Y Adult: 180 Child: 29 PGY2:3 mos PGY4:12 mos PGY5:8 hrs/mo Adult: 60 Child: 13 41.7 49.8 2 residents/year selected for Clinical Neuroscience Training Program that offers advanced research training; 184 patient-oriented research grants Optional 39.1 (3) 52.7 (15) Johns Hopkins (child)3 N N 35 PGY6: ½ day/wk 12 43 46 — Optional 33.3 (5) 137.0 (1)

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Washington University (both)4 Y Y Adult : 67 Child: 6 PGY2:50% for 4 mos PGY4:8–10 mos PGY5:20% for 8 mos Adult: 38 Child: 6 37 42 45 R01 grants, 14 K awards, and 6 training grants; 27 research fellows; offers a master degree in psychiatric epidemiology Optional 33.3 (6) 62.0 (11) Duke (both)5 Y Y Adult: 171 Child: 12 PGY3:4–12 hrs/wk PGY4:4–20 hrs/wk Adult: 43 Child: 8 37 44 — Negotiable in adult; optional in child 32.9 (7) 80.0 (6) UCSD (both)6 Y Y Adult: 50 Child: 9 PGY4:12 mos PGY5:0 Adult: 36 Child: 8 37 47 Research requirement for residents; 2–3 residents enter research track (began in 1998) –research time of 20% in PGY3 and 75% in PGY4; 3 NIMH-funded clinical research centers Optional 26.2 (8) 80.0 (5) Stanford (both)7 Y Y Adult: 45 Child: 8 PGY4:9 mos Adult: 45 41 51 Research track available to 2 residents-research time of 25% in PGY3 and 80% in PGY4 Optional for adult 21.3 (9) 44.6 (20) Columbia (both)8 Y Y Adult: 120 Child: 59 PGY4:65% PGY5:15% for 6 mos Adult: 47 Child: 13 43 73 9 separate postresidency research training programs Optional 20.0 (10) 46.1 (17)

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Brief Descriptions of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs, Sorted by NIH 2002 Funding Rank for Each Department Institutiona Research Track Mentoring Program No. of FTE Faculty M.D.sb Elective Timec No. of Residentsd Resident Compensation ($1000s)e Other Notes Research Rotation FY2002 NIH Funding ($ millions, rank) PGY1 PGY5 Psychiatry Internal Medicine UCLA – Harbor (both)9 N Nf 25 PGY4:40% 28 36 50 NIMH Minority Mental Health Research Unit Optional 19.1 (11) 71.7 (8) UCLA – Neuropsychiatric Institute (child)10 N Y 20 PGY5:5 hrs/wk 12 37 47 1–2 yr NIMH-funded research fellowship for M.D.’s or Ph.D.’s Negotiable 19.1 (11) 71.7 (8) University of Texas at Southwestern (both)*11 Y Y Adult: 80 Child: 8 PGY4:7 mos PGY5:15% Adult: 61 Child: 10 35 42 7 residents on the research track; those completing the research track are recruited as junior faculty Optional for adult 18.6 (13) 46.5 (16) University of Colorado (child)12 Y Y 20 PGY4:6 hrs/wk PGY5:15 hrs/wk 9 38 47 6 research institutes; T32 training grant Optional 13.8 (17) 57.4 (14)

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Emory (both)*13 N Y Adult: 60 Child: 8–10 PGY4:8 mos PGY5: <2 mos Adult: 50 Child: 8 39 45 Pending R25 to fund formal research track; offers a masters degree in clinical research through the School of Public Health Optional 13.7 (18) 26.8 (34) NYU (child)14 Y Y 21 PGY5:1 day/wk for 3 mos 12 45 53 Residents exposed to research in PGY2; NIMH-funded fellowship available Optional 9.6 (26) 20.3 (43) University of Michigan (adult)15 Y Y 50 4-yr track: 8–9 mos 5-yr track: 2–3 mos 48 37 45 50% of academic track residents have M.D./Ph.D.; R25 mechanism provides 18 months of research training aspart of 5-year residency Optional 9.6 (27) 66.3 (10) Wayne State (both)16 Yg Nh Nf Adult: 31 Child: 8 PGY3: ½ day/wk for 12 mos PGY4:5 mos PGY5:2 mos Adult: 24 Child: 6 39 44 Adult psychiatry residents are required to produce a scholarly paper and present at grand rounds; masters of science in psychiatry Optional 7.6 (28) 13.0 (55) University of Maryland (both)17 Y Y Adult: 49 Child: 3 PGY4:12 mos PGY5:0 Adult: 74 Child: 10 37 43 NIMH-funded research track extends residency to 5 years Optional 7.3 (31) 32.5 (30) University of Minnesota (both)*18 Y Y Adult: 29 Child: 4 PGY4:12 mos PGY5:3 mos Adult: 33 Child: 6 38 44 — Optional 6.4 (33) 28.2 (33)

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Brief Descriptions of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs, Sorted by NIH 2002 Funding Rank for Each Department Institutiona Research Track Mentoring Program No. of FTE Faculty M.D.sb Elective Timec No. of Residentsd Resident Compensation ($1000s)e Other Notes Research Rotation FY2002 NIH Funding ($ millions, rank) PGY1 PGY5 Psychiatry Internal Medicine University of Vermont (adult)19 Y Y 21 PGY4:8 mos 16 39 N/A Behavioral Genetics Research Division; Center For Children, Youth, and Families; Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit; Human Behavioral Psychopharmacology Unit; 14 R01 grants; department ranked 2nd in funding at university; 11 research fellows Optional 6.0 (34) 14.0 (51) Indiana University (both)*20 N N Adult: 28 Child: 8 PGY2–PGY4: <12 mos PGY5: N/A Adult: 24 Child: 8 38 40 Research-minded residents recruited as junior faculty; pending NIH application for a research track Negotiable in adult; optional for child 5.2 (37) 41.3 (22) Virginia Commonwealth University (both)*21 N Y Adult: 35 Child: 8 PGY4:10-20 hrs/wk for 8 mos; PGY4 (Child): Y Adult: 36 Child: 6 36 39 Required research activity Optional for adult 4.9 (39) 14.3 (50)

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Dartmouth (both)22 N Y Adult: 44 Child: 6 PGY4:6 mos PGY5:1.5 mos Adult: 27 Child: 6i 41 47 — Optional 4.8 (40) 12.7 (56) University of Connecticut (both)j 23 N Y Adult: 31 Child: 5 PGY4 (Adult): 40% PGY4 (Child): 2 mos Adult: 28 Child: 6 40 44 $10 million research budget; research requirement; provides intense one-on-one didactic research training to young investigators Required 4.6 (41) 9.7 (64) University of Arkansas (both)*24 Y Y Adult: 54 Child: 10 PGY4:12 mos PGY5:23% Adult: 24 Child: 4 34 39 — Optional 4.2 (42) 7.5 (69) Ohio State University (both)25 N N Adult: 16 Child: 3.5 PGY2:1 mos PGY4:5 mos PGY5:0 Adult: 20 Child: 2 38 44 $15 million neuropsychiatric facility opened in 1994 Optional for adult 3.6 (45) 24.3 (37) UMDNJ–Newark (both)26 N N Adult: <43 Child: 6 PGY4: <8 mos PGY5: <6 mos Adult: 30 Child: 4 41 51 Planning to implement one-on-one mentorship; hosts an annual research day Optional for adult; 26 wks required rotation for child 3.3 (47) 6.0 (74) Brown (both)*27 Y Y Adult: 30 Child: 14 PGY4:6-8 mos PGY5:60% for 4 mos Adult: 40 Child: 10 39 46 1–2 residents/yr on the research track; tracks residents after graduating; has two T32 programs; hosts annual research day Optional in adult; 1 wk required in child 2.7 (51) 1.1 (100)

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Brief Descriptions of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs, Sorted by NIH 2002 Funding Rank for Each Department Institutiona Research Track Mentoring Program No. of FTE Faculty M.D.sb Elective Timec No. of Residentsd Resident Compensation ($1000s)e Other Notes Research Rotation FY2002 NIH Funding ($ millions, rank) PGY1 PGY5 Psychiatry Internal Medicine Howard (adult)28 N Y 17 PGY4:5–9 mos 15 35 40 Faculty have received $6 million for mood and anxiety studies from NIH; site for NIMH-funded Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder Optional 1.2 (65) 3.6 (80) Thomas Jefferson University (adult)29 Y N 17 PGY4:6 mos 28 38 — Research Scholars Program for physician-scientists, Training Program in Human Investigation Optional 0.99 (71) 21.3 (41) Wake Forest (both)30 N N Adult: 12 Child: 3 PGY4:6 mos PGY5: N/A Adult: 23 Child: 3 37 39 1 K23 grant, 2 career awards, 1 APA award, 5 pharmaceutical grants, 8 additional grants through NIMH, 1 NICHD grant; NIMH-funded Research Infrastructure Support Program Optional for adult 0.92 (72) 15.9 (46)

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Medical College of Georgia (child)31 N Y 6 0 4 36 40 Residents must complete a research paper Negotiable 0.72 (76) 2.9 (84) SUNY– Buffalo (child)32 N Y 9 <6 mos 6 34 38 Research project required; research involvement for 2 hrs/wk in PGY4 and 6 weeks full-time in PGY5 Negotiable 0.46 (79) 4.4 (79) Texas A&M (both)33 N N Adult: 27 Child: 4 PGY4:8 mos PGY5:30% for 6 mos Adult: 16 Child: 4 36 41 Adult program began in 1993; child program began in 1998 Optional 0.35 (80) 0.17 (110) Elmhurst Hospital Center (adult)34 N Y 34 PGY4:6–8 mos 28 ~40s — Institute for Cultural and Epidemiological Psychiatry Optional N/A N/A Maine Medical Center (both)35 N N Adult: 15 Child: 5 PGY4:4 mos PGY5:0 Adult: 16 Child: 4 40 48 Required scholarly project Optional for adult N/A N/A Mayo Clinic (both)36 Y Y Adult: 39 Child: 8 PGY4:6 mos PGY5: <4 mos Adult: 31 Child: 6 39 45 Offers the Clinician-Investigator Training program—masters degree, formal training in basic and clinical research Optional N/A N/A

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Brief Descriptions of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs, Sorted by NIH 2002 Funding Rank for Each Department Institutiona Research Track Mentoring Program No. of FTE Faculty M.D.sb Elective Timec No. of Residentsd Resident Compensation ($1000s)e Other Notes Research Rotation FY2002 NIH Funding ($ millions, rank) PGY1 PGY5 Psychiatry Internal Medicine Med College Ohio (child)37 N N 3 2 4 39 45 Research/review paper required Optional N/A 1.1 (101) Michigan State University– Kalamazoo Center (adult)38 N Y 11 PGY4:6 mos 16 38 42 Residency program began in 1997; residents must be involved in a research project by either designing their own small study or joining and participating in larger faculty projects Optional N/A N/A North Dakota (adult)39 Y Y 4 PGY4: <12 mos 16 39 — $22 million endowment for Neuropsychiatry Research Institute Optional N/A N/A St. Luke’s Hospital (both)40 Y N Adult: 79 PGY4:6 mos PGY5:1 day/wk for 4 mos Adult: 32 46 — Two residents chosen for research track beginning in PGY3; research electives may be carried out in the department, with a member of Columbia University or at an affiliated institution Optional for adult N/A N/A

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Southern Illinois University (adult)41 N N 15 PGY4:9 mos 12 (10 Internal medicine/ psychiatry) 40 46 Residents interested in research collaborate with research director Optional N/A 0.09 (111) University of Louisville (both)42 N N Adult: 36 Child: 6 PGY4:3 mos PGY5: <4 mos Adult: 36 Child: 4 37 45 About 25% of faculty actively engaged in research; Mood Disorders Research Program; Clinical Psychopharmacology Research Program Optional N/A 7.0 (70) University of Nebraska (both)*43 N N Adult: 29 Child: 7 PGY4: <4 mos Adult: 24 Child: 4 39 45 — Optional for adult; 2 wks required rotation for child N/A 2.4 (91) NOTES: APA = American Psychiatric Association; FTE = full-time equivalent; M.D.=medical doctor/doctor of medicine; NICHD =National Institute of Child Health and Human Development; NIH = National Institutes of Health; NIMH =National Institute of Mental Health; WPIC = Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic; NYU= New York University; PGY =postgraduate year; SUNY = State University of New York; UCLA = University of California, Los Angeles; UCSD =University of California, San Diego; UMDNJ = University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey; * = Departments whose chairs were interviewed a“Both” refers to adult (general) psychiatry and child and adolescent psychiatry residency programs. In cases where both residencies are discussed, the table lists separately: the number of full-time equivalent M.D. faculty, amount of elective time, number of residents, level of compensation, and research rotation requirements. bInformation obtained from the American Medical Association’s (AMA) Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database (FREIDA). [Online]. Available: http://www.ama-assn.org:/vapp/freida/srch/1,2667,Y,00.html [accessed January 17, 2003], unless specifically provided by department staff or chairs who were interviewed. c Information obtained primarily from the American Psychiatric Association’s Directory of Psychiatry Residency Training Programs (Seventh Edition). 1997. Washington, DC and from the psychiatry department’s website if information was unavailable in that source. PGY2, PGY3, and PGY4 refer to the adult (general) psychiatry program, and PGY5 and PGY6 refers to the child and adolescent psychiatry program, unless otherwise indicated. The symbol “Y” for “yes” is given if elective time is available, but it is not clear how much time is allocated, and “N/A” denotes “not available” if the information was not provided or could not be found. d Information obtained from FREIDA (see note b). e As with note d.

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform fInformal. g For adult. h For child/adolescent. iThe University of Vermont shares a child and adolescent residency with Dartmouth. There are two child and adolescent psychiatry residents at Dartmouth, which serves as the primary site. jThe University of Connecticut shares a child and adolescent residency with the Institute of Living. SOURCES: 1Personal communication, P. Pilkonis, WPIC, March 10, 2003; personal communication, N. Ryan, WPIC, April 16, 2003, April 17, 2003; Pilkonis PA. 2001 (November 7). Pittsburgh Model: Early Faculty Development (R25 Model). National Institute of Mental Health and the American Psychiatric Association Workshop on Research Training for Psychiatrists. Bethesda, MD; Swartz HA, Cho RY. 2002 (Fall). Building Bridges: The Pittsburgh Model of Research Career Development, Psychiatric Research Report; Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. [Online]. Available: http://www.wpic.pitt.edu/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 2Personal communication, S. Bunney, Yale University, June 17, 2003; personal communication, D. Stubbe, Yale University, June 19, 2003; Yale University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://info.med.yale.edu/psych/welcome.html [accessed May 6, 2003]. 3Personal communication, E. Frosch, Johns Hopkins University, February 20, 2003, March 10, 2003; Johns Hopkins University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. [Online]. Available: http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/jhhpsychiatry/master1.htm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 4Hudziak, J. 2002 (June 20). The Implications of Size, Culture, RRC, and Funding on Psychiatric Research Training in Residency: University of Washington and the University of Vermont. Presentation at the Institute of Medicine Committee on Incorporating Research into Psychiatry Residency Training. Washington, DC; Washington University St. Louis Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: www.psychiatry.wustl.edu [accessed May 6, 2003]. 5Personal communication, G. Thrall, Duke University, April 2, 2003; March JS. 2002 (June 19). Research Training in Child Psychiatry. Presentation at the Institute of Medicine Workshop for the Committee on Incorporating Research into Psychiatry Residency Training. Washington, DC; Duke University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.psychres.duke.edu [accessed May 6, 2003]. 6Personal communication, S. Zisook, UCSD, February 11, 2003, April 3, 2003; UCSD Residency Training Program. [Online]. Available: http://residenttraining.ucsd.edu/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 7Personal communication, F. Sloss, Stanford University, March 6, 2003; Meyer RE, McLaughlin CJ. 1998. Between Mind, Brain, and Managed Care. Washington, DC: APA; Stanford University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://psychiatry.stanford.edu/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 8Shaffer D. 2002 (June 19). Child Psychiatry's Perspective: Part I. Presentation at the Institute of Medicine Workshop of the Committee on Incorporating Research into Psychiatry Residency Training. Washington, DC; personal communication, R. Rieder, Columbia University, April 10, 2003, April 11, 2003; personal communication, J. Dierkens, Columbia University, April 9, 2003; Columbia University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept/pi/psychres/psychfront-gd.html [accessed May 6, 2003].

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform 9Personal communication, I. Lesser, UCLA-Harbor, February 25, 2003, April 2, 2003; Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.harboruclapsych.com/home.htm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 10 Personal communication, B. Zima, UCLA-NPI, February 10, 2003; personal communication, K. Nelson, UCLA-NPI, March 27, 2003; UCLA Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.psychiatry.ucla.edu/index.html [accessed May 6, 2003]. 11 Personal communication, E. Nestler, University of Texas at Southwestern, November 7, 2002, February 11, 2003, May 28, 2003; The University of Texas at Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www3.utsouthwestern.edu/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 12 Personal communication, D. Carter, University of Colorado, February 11, 2003; personal communication, R. Harmon, University of Colorado, February 10, 2003; Meyer RE, McLaughlin CJ. 1998. Between Mind, Brain, and Managed Care. Washington, DC: APA; University of Colorado Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.uchsc.edu/sm/psych/dept/index.htm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 13 Personal communication, C. Nemeroff, Emory University, November 21, 2002; personal communication, M. Crowder, Emory University, March 28, 2003; personal communication, P. Haugaard, Emory University, March 28, 2003; Emory University Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. [Online]. Available: http://www.psychiatry.emory.edu/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 14 Personal communication, C. Alonso, New York University, March 27, 2003; New York University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.med.nyu.edu/Psych/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 15 Personal communication, M. Jibson, University of Michigan, February 11, 2003; Meador-Woodruff JH. 2001 (November 7). Residency Research Track Program (R25 Model). National Institute of Mental Health and the American Psychiatric Association Workshop on Research Training for Psychiatrists. Bethesda, MD; University of Michigan Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.med.umich.edu/psych/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 16 Personal communication, B. Brooks, Wayne State University, February 10, 2003; Wayne State University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.med.wayne.edu/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 17 Personal communication, M. P. Luber, University of Maryland, April 7, 2003; Sheppard Pratt Health System. [Online]. Available: http://www.sheppardpratt.org [accessed May 6, 2003]; University of Maryland/Sheppard Pratt Psychiatry Residency Program. [Online]. Available: http://www.umm.edu/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 18 Personal communication, C. Schulz, November 22, 2002; personal communication, T. Mackenzie, University of Minnesota, November 22, 2002; University of Minnesota Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.med.umn.edu/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 19Hudziak, J. 2002 (June 20).The Implications of Size, Culture, RRC, and Funding on Psychiatric Research Training in Residency: University of Washington and the University of Vermont. Presentation at the Institute of Medicine Committee on Incorporating Research into Psychiatry Residency Training. Washington, DC; personal communication, J. Hudziak, University of Vermont, March 30, 2003; University of Vermont [Online]. Available: http://www.vtmednet.org/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 20Personal communication, C. McDougle, Indiana University, November 4, 2002, February 10, 2003; Indiana University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.iupui.edu/~psycdept/ [accessed May 6, 2003].

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform 21Personal communication, J. Silverman, Virginia Commonwealth University, November 5, 2002, February 19, 2003; Virginia Commonwealth University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://views.vcu.edu/psych/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 22Personal communication, R. Racusin, Dartmouth University, February 11, 2003, personal communication, J. Hudziak, University of Vermont, March 30, 2003; Meyer RE, McLaughlin CJ. 1998. Between Mind, Brain, and Managed Care. Washington, DC: APA; Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. [Online]. Available: http://www.hitchcock.org/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 23Personal communication, L. Huey, University of Connecticut, October 3, 2002, February 14, 2003, July 30, 2003; University of Connecticut Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://psychiatry.uchc.edu/index.php [accessed May 6, 2003]. 24Personal communication, G. R. Smith, University of Arkansas, December 5, 2002, March 30, 2003; Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program Manual 2002-2003 [Online]. Available: http://www.childpsych.uams.edu/Residency%20Manual/RM%2002-03.pdf [accessed May 6, 2003]; UAMS Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.uams.edu/psych/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 25Personal communication, H. Nasrallah, Veterans Administration Medical Center, July 29, 2003; Ohio State University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://medicine.osu.edu/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 26Personal communication, C. Kellner, UMDNJ–New Jersey Medical School at Newark, November 12, 2002; UMDNJ Psychiatry Residency Training Program. [Online]. Available: http://njms.umdnj.edu/psychiatry/residency/index.htm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 27Personal communication, M. Keller, Brown University, November 20, 2002; personal communication, T. Mueller, Brown University, November 20, 2002, March 28, 2003; personal communication, H. Leonard, Brown University, November 20, 2002; Brown University Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior. [Online]. Available: http://www.neuropsychiatry.com/DPHB/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 28Lawson, W. 2002 (June 20). Howard University. Presentation at the Institute of Medicine Committee on Incorporating Research into Psychiatry Residency Training. Washington, DC; personal communication, J. Hutchinson, Howard University, May 5, 2003; Howard University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.huhosp.org/psychiatry/index.htm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 29Personal communication, E. Silberman, Thomas Jefferson University, February 10, 2003; Thomas Jefferson University Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior. [Online]. Available: http://www.tju.edu/psych/home/index.cfm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 30Personal communication, S. Kramer, Wake Forest University, February 12, 2003; Wake Forest University Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.wfubmc.edu/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 31Medical College of Georgia General Psychiatry Residency Program. [Online]. Available: http://www.mcg.edu/Resident/psychiatry/Index.htm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 32Personal communication, D. L. Kaye, SUNY-University of Buffalo, April 3, 2003; SUNY-University of Buffalo Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.smbs.buffalo.edu/psychiatry/main/index.html [accessed May 6, 2003]. 33Personal communication, J. Ripperger-Suhler, Texas A&M University Scott & White Clinic, April 22, 2003; Texas A&M University Graduate Medical Education. [Online]. Available: http://www.sw.org/gme/welcome.htm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 34Personal communication, A. Hoffman, Elmhurst Hospital, February 10, 2003; Elmhurst Hospital. [Online]. Available: http://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/hhc/html/elmhurst.html [accessed May 6, 2003].

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform 35Personal communication, G. McNeil, Maine Medical Center, April 4, 2003; Maine Medical Center General Psychiatry Residency Training. [Online]. Available: http://www.mmc.org/residencies/psychiatry/default.htm [accessed May 6, 2003]. 36Personal communication, G. Rink, Mayo Clinic, March 27, 2003; Mayo Clinic. [Online]. Available: http://mayoclinic.org [accessed May 6, 2003]. 37Personal communication, W. J. Kim, Medical College of Ohio, February 10, 2003; Medical College of Ohio Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.mco.edu/depts/psych/ [accessed May 6, 2003] 38Personal communication, M. Liepman, Michigan State University–Kalamazoo Center, February 11, 2003; Michigan State University-Kalamazoo Center Psychiatry Residency Program. [Online]. Available: http://www.kcms.msu.edu/programs/psychiatry/index.html [accessed May 6, 2003]. 39Personal communication, D. Abbott, University of North Dakota, April 10, 2003; UND Psychiatry Residency Training Program. [Online]. Available: http://www.med.und.nodak.edu/residency/residency/psychiatry.html [accessed May 6, 2003]. 40St. Luke’s–Roosevelt Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: www.wehealny.org/psych/residency.html [accessed May 6, 2003]. 41Personal communication, S. Soltys, Southern Illinois University, February 14, 2003; SIU Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.siumed.edu/medpsy/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 42Personal communication, K. Vincent, University of Louisville, February 26, 2003; Meyer RE, McLaughlin CJ. 1998. Between Mind, Brain, and Managed Care. Washington, DC: APA; University of Louisville Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. [Online]. Available: http://www.louisville.edu/medschool/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003]. 43Personal communication, D. Folks, University of Nebraska, November 18, 2002, April 16, 2003; University of Nebraska Department of Psychiatry. [Online]. Available: http://www.unmc.edu/psychiatry/ [accessed May 6, 2003].

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