F
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Dan G. Blazer, M.D., Ph.D, M.P.H. (Chair), JP Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. He is a Professor of Community and Family Medicine at Duke University and Head of the University Council on Aging and Human Development. His work has focused on the epidemiologic study of psychiatric disorders and physical problems of aging, especially in community populations. He is a past chairman of the board and president of the American Geriatrics Society and past president of the Psychiatric Research Society. Dr. Blazer is a fellow of the American College of Psychiatry and the American Psychiatric Association. Elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1995, Dr. Blazer has served on a number of IOM and National Research Council committees including the Committee on Educating Public Health Professionals in the 21st Century, Committee on Measuring the Health of Gulf War Veterans (serving as co-chair), the Panel on Statistics for an Aging Population, and the Committee on the Evaluation of the Department of Defense Clinical Evaluation Protocol (serving as chair).

Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, M.D., Professor and Chief of the Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. She was chair of the department for 16 years. Dr. Barrett-Connor’s research is related to the endocrinology of aging and gender differences in cardiovascular disease and diabetes. She was elected to the IOM in 1991.

Baruch A. Brody, Ph.D., Leon Jaworski Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director of the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine. He is also Professor of Philosophy at Rice University and Director of the Ethics program at the Methodist Hospital. Dr. Brody’s



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Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions F Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Dan G. Blazer, M.D., Ph.D, M.P.H. (Chair), JP Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. He is a Professor of Community and Family Medicine at Duke University and Head of the University Council on Aging and Human Development. His work has focused on the epidemiologic study of psychiatric disorders and physical problems of aging, especially in community populations. He is a past chairman of the board and president of the American Geriatrics Society and past president of the Psychiatric Research Society. Dr. Blazer is a fellow of the American College of Psychiatry and the American Psychiatric Association. Elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1995, Dr. Blazer has served on a number of IOM and National Research Council committees including the Committee on Educating Public Health Professionals in the 21st Century, Committee on Measuring the Health of Gulf War Veterans (serving as co-chair), the Panel on Statistics for an Aging Population, and the Committee on the Evaluation of the Department of Defense Clinical Evaluation Protocol (serving as chair). Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, M.D., Professor and Chief of the Division of Epidemiology, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. She was chair of the department for 16 years. Dr. Barrett-Connor’s research is related to the endocrinology of aging and gender differences in cardiovascular disease and diabetes. She was elected to the IOM in 1991. Baruch A. Brody, Ph.D., Leon Jaworski Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director of the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine. He is also Professor of Philosophy at Rice University and Director of the Ethics program at the Methodist Hospital. Dr. Brody’s

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Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions main research interests are in the ethics of scientific research, particularly in the ethical issues in the design of clinical trials, ethical issues raised by conflicts of interest, and ethical issues regarding intellectual property rights in biotechnology. Dr. Brody has served on a number of NIH data and safety monitoring boards and is a Fellow of the Hastings Center. Dr. Brody was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2001. Robert M. Califf, M.D., Director of the Duke Clinical Research Unit, and Professor of Medicine in the Division of Cardiology, and Associate Vice Chancellor for Clinical Research at the Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Califf’s research focuses on clinical and economic outcomes in chronic ischemic heart disease. He has led a number of long-term clinical trials evaluating a range of cardiovascular treatments and procedures. He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, and a certified specialist in internal medicine and cardiovascular diseases. Dr. Califf has served on several National Research Council committees including the Roundtable on Research and Development of Drugs, Biologics, and Medical Devices. Joseph P. Costantino, Dr.P.H., Professor of Biostatistics at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. His research interests are in the design, implementation, and analysis of clinical trials. He has worked on the development of statistical methodologies for cancer risk assessment and risk-benefit assessment of therapies with multiple endpoints. He also is the Associate Director of the Biostatistical Center of the National Surgical Breast and Bowel Project and serves as the coordinating statistician for prevention trials of the project. Daniel D. Federman, M.D., Senior Dean for Alumni Relations and Clinical Teaching and the Carl W. Walter Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Medical Education at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Federman’s research interests focus on reproductive endocrinology, the physiology of gender differences, and the ethics of health and medical care. Dr. Federman is an IOM member who has served on a number of committees, including the Committee to Study the Legal and Ethical Issues Relating to the Inclusion of Women in Clinical Studies (serving as co-chair), the Committee to Assess the System for Protecting Human Research Participants (serving as chair), and the Committee on Understanding the Biology of Sex and Gender Differences. Linda P. Fried, M.D., M.P.H., Director of the Center on Aging and Health and the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, and Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Health Policy at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Her core research interests are prevention and health promo-

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Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions tion for older adults, with particular emphasis on the discovery of the causes of frailty and disability and their prevention. Dr. Fried is the principal investigator of several major population-based research projects, including the Women’s Health and Aging Studies and the Cardiovascular Health Study. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a recipient of an National Institute on Aging MERIT Award. Deborah G. Grady, M.D., M.P.H., Professor and Vice Chair of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. She is Acting Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and Director of the UCSF/Mount Zion Women’s Health Clinical Research Center. Her research focuses on the risks and benefits of postmenopausal hormone therapy. She was co-principal investigator of the Heart and Estrogen-progestin Replacement Study (HERS), a randomized trial of the effects of estrogen plus progestin therapy on clinical outcomes in women with coronary disease. William R. Hazzard, M.D., Professor of Medicine at the University of Washington in Seattle and Director of Geriatrics and Extended Care for the VA Puget Sound Health Care System. Dr. Hazzard’s research interests focus on the role of sex steroids in lipoprotein metabolism, atherogenesis, and longevity, with an interest in the mechanisms, consequences, and prevention of chronic diseases including hypocholesterolemia and cognitive dysfunction in aging humans. Dr. Hazzard served as founding Director of the J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, where he is currently a senior advisor. Elected to the IOM in 1991, Dr. Hazzard has served on the IOM Committee on Strengthening the Geriatric Content of Medical Training and on the IOM Committee on Changing Health Care Systems and Rheumatic Disease. Steven B. Heymsfield, M.D., Professor of Medicine at Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. He also currently serves as Deputy Director of the New York Obesity Research Center and is Director of the Human Body Composition Laboratory. Dr. Heymsfield’s research focuses on body composition, weight cycling, nutrition, and obesity. He has served on the IOM Committee on Body Composition, Nutrition, and Health of Military Women and the Subcommittee on Military Weight Management Programs. Stephen W. Lagakos, Ph.D., Chair of the Department of Biostatistics at the Harvard University School of Public Health. His research interests are in a variety of statistical issues, both methodological and applied, that

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Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions arise in the design, monitoring, and analysis of clinical trials, observational studies, and other biomedical investigations, especially as applied to HIV and other infectious diseases. Dr. Lagakos is an IOM member who has served on a number of Academy committees including the Roundtable for the Development of Drugs and Vaccines against AIDS and the Committee on Evaluation of Cyclamate for Carcinogenicity. Mark S. Litwin, M.D., M.P.H., Professor of Urology and Health Services at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the UCLA School of Public Health, and a researcher at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Litwin’s research interests include medical outcomes assessment, health-related quality of life, quality of care, and patient preferences. His current work focuses on quality of life after treatment for early and late stage prostate cancer, quality of care in prostate cancer, and epidemiological trends in the burden of illness from urologic disease. Paul A. Lombardo, Ph.D., J.D., Associate Professor and Director of the Program in Law and Medicine at the Center for Biomedical Ethics at the University of Virginia. For the past 12 years he has been a member of the Institutional Review Board at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. He sits on the Central Beryllium IRB of the Department of Energy, charged with reviewing all research on current or former workers related to potential beryllium exposure, and the newly formed Clinical Trials Review Committee of the NIH National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. His research and publications have dealt with a variety of issues in bioethics, including research ethics, the history of eugenics, and the legal and ethical issues surrounding medical privacy and confidentiality. Peter S. Nelson, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Oncology at the University of Washington and Associate Member of the Human Biology Division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Dr. Nelson’s research focuses on the biology of prostatic carcinogenesis and the development and application of technologies to identify novel prostate-specific genes and androgen-regulated gene expression changes in the progression of prostate cancer. Eric S. Orwoll, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Program Director of the General Clinical Research Center, and Associate Dean for Clinical Research at Oregon Health and Sciences University School of Medicine. Dr. Orwoll directs the Bone and Mineral Research Unit where his research focuses on bone biology in both humans and animals, including the conduct of large epidemiological studies of skeletal health in men.

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Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions Leslie R. Schover, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Behavioral Science at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Schover is a psychologist with a special interest in treating sexual problems and infertility-related distress, especially after a chronic illness such as cancer. Her research includes a focus on reproductive health issues particularly related to prostate and breast cancer treatment. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, the Society of Behavioral Medicine, and the International Academy of Sex Research. E. Darracott Vaughan, Jr., M.D., Chairman Emeritus of the Department of Urology and the James J. Colt Professor of Urology at the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and the past attending urologist-in-chief at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Additionally, he serves as attending surgeon, Department of Urology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York. Dr. Vaughan is President Emeritus of the American Foundation for Urologic Disease, past co-chairman of the Prostate Health Council, and immediate past president of the American Urological Association. He currently serves on the National Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health. He is a member of numerous scientific societies including Alpha Omega Alpha and has received a number of awards including the Hugh Hampton Young Award from the American Urological Association. Dr. Vaughan was the editor of Seminars in Urology, is a co-editor of Campbell’s Urology, and serves on the editorial boards of the World Journal of Urology, Urology, and several other journals. IOM STAFF Catharyn T. Liverman, M.L.S., Senior Program Officer at the Institute of Medicine. In 12 years at IOM, she has worked on projects addressing a number of topics, including veterans’ health, drug abuse, and injury prevention. Her background is in medical library science, with previous jobs at the National Agricultural Library and the Naval War College Library. She received her B.A. from Wake Forest University and her M.L.S. from the University of Maryland. Benjamin N. Hamlin, B.A., research assistant at the Institute of Medicine, received his bachelors in Biology from the College of Wooster in 1993 and a degree in health sciences from the University of Akron in 1996. He then worked as a surgeon’s assistant in the fields of vascular, thoracic and general surgery for several years before joining the National Academies in

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Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions 2000. As a Research Assistant for the Division on Earth and Life Studies at the National Academies, Ben worked with the Board on Radiation Effects Research on projects studying the health effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations on the human body. Currently Ben is pursuing graduate work in International Health Promotion and Social Medicine. He is also involved with the U.S. Bangladesh Advisory Council, an organization that promotes governmental cooperation between the United States and Bangladesh on matters of trade and healthcare. Judith L. Estep, Senior Program Assistant at the Institute of Medicine. She has been with The National Academies/Institute of Medicine since 1986 and has provided administrative support for more than 30 published reports. Her interests outside the Institute of Medicine include family (11 grandchildren) and riding her motorcycle.