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Appendixes

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Appendix A Committee and Panel Member Biographical Sketches 1. Committee to Examine the Methoclology for the Assessment of Research-Doctorate Programs 2. Panel on Taxonomy and Interclisciplinarity 3. Panel on Quantitative Measures 4. Panel on Reputational Measures and Data Presentation 5. Panel on Student Processes and Outcomes COMMITTEE TO EXAMINE THE METHODOLOGY FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF RESEARCH-DOCTORATE PROGRAMS Biographical Sketches JEREMIAH P. OSTRIKER, Ph.D. (NAS), Committee Chair, is a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University and Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experi- mental Philosophy at the University of Cambridge. He received his B.A. in physics and chemistry from Harvard University and his Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Chicago. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Cambridge University, Dr. Ostriker served on the faculty at Princeton University as a professor (1966-present), as department chair and director of the Princeton University Observatory (1979- 1995), and as university provost (1995-2001~. During his tenure as provost, Princeton received a major grant from the Mellon Foundation to improve doctoral education in the humanities. He has received many awards and honors, including membership in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and in 2001, the U.S. National Medal of Science. He has served on several National Research Council (NRC) and National Academies committees, including the NAS Council and the NRC Governing Board. Dr. O striker also served as a member of the Panel on Quantitative Measures. 69 ELTON D. ABERLE, Ph.D., is Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. He received his B.S. from Kansas State Univer- sity in 1962, his M.S. from Michigan State University in 1965, and his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in food sciences in 1967. Previously, Dr. Aberle held administra- tive positions at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Insti- tute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and a faculty position at Purdue University. His research and teaching background is in muscle biology, and animal and food sciences. Dr. Aberle has received teaching and research awards from the American Society of Animal Sciences and the American Meat Science Association, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society of Animal Science. He also served on the Panel on Taxonomy and Interdisciplinarity. JOHN BRAUMAN, Ph.D. (NAS), is the J.G. Jackson-C.J. Jackson Professor of Chemistry and Cognizant Dean for the Natural Sciences at Stanford University. He received his B.S. in 1959 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in 1963 from the University of California- Berkeley. Dr. Brauman's research is directed toward under- standing how molecules react and the factors that determine the rates and products of chemical reactions. The principal areas of his research involve the spectroscopy, photo- chemistry, reaction dynamics, and reaction mechanisms of

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70 ions in the gas phase. Dr. Brauman is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as well as of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an Honorary Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences. He has received numerous honors, including an NAS Award in the Chemical Sciences and an American Chemical Society award in Pure Chemistry. In his role as Cognizant Dean he oversees the departments of: applied physics, biological sci- ences, history, mathematics, physics, psychology, statistics, and the Hopkins Marine Station. He also served on the Panel on Reputational Measures and Data Presentation. GEORGE BUGLIARELLO, Sc.D. (NAB), is President Emeritus and University Professor at Polytechnic Univer- sity, where he served as President (1973-94) and Chancellor (1994-2003~. He holds a Dott. Ing. in 1951 from the Uni- versity of Padua, an M.S. in 1954 from the University of Minnesota, and a Sc.D. in 1959 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Bugliarello has a range of administra- tive experience as professor and dean of engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle and as professor and chairman of the Biotechnology Program at Carnegie Mellon University. His honors and awards include: Member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAB), Founding Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engi- neering, Fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education, Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engi- neers, and Fellow of the New York Academy of Sciences. Dr. Bugliarello is Past President of Sigma Xi the Scientific Research Society, and was elected in 2003 to a four-year term as Foreign Secretary of the NAB. His research interests include biomedical engineering, fluid mechanics, computer languages, and socio-technology. He also served on the Panel on Taxonomy and Interdisciplinarity. WALTER COHEN, Ph.D., currently serves as Vice Pro- vost and Professor of Comparative Literature at Cornell University. He also served as Dean of the Graduate School. He did his undergraduate work at Stanford University. Dr. Cohen joined the Cornell faculty after receiving his doc- torate from the University of California-Berkeley in 1980. His academic specialties are Renaissance drama, literary theory, and the history of European literature. From 1998- 1999, he served as president of the Association of Graduate Schools. He also served as co-chair of the Panel on Taxonomy and Interdisciplinarity. JONATHAN COLE, Ph.D., is the John Mitchell Mason Professor of the University and Provost at Columbia Univer- sity. He joined the faculty at Columbia in 1968 and served as the Director of the Center for Social Sciences from 1979 to 1987, Vice Provost for Arts and Sciences from 1987 to 1989, and the Quetelet Professor of Social Sciences from 1989 to 2001. Dr. Cole's awards and honors include a APPENDIX A Guggenheim Fellowship, Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and Fellow of the Ameri- can Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has published exten- sively on the growth of scientific knowledge, the social organization of peer review in science, and women in the scientific community. Dr. Cole was a member of the previous committee for the study of research-doctorate programs. He also served as co-chair of the Panel on Reputational Measures and Data Presentation. RONALD GRAHAM, Ph.D. (NAS), is Irwin and Joan Jacobs Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California-San Diego and Chief Scientist at the California Institute for Tele- communication and Information Technology of the Univer- sity of California-San Diego. He holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California-Berkeley as well as a B.S. in physics from the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. Dr. Graham served as Director of Information Sciences at AT&T Bell Laboratories for more than 30 years. He has held numerous professorships in mathematics and computer science at institutions such as Rutgers University, Princeton University, Stanford University, and the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Graham's research work focuses on various areas in combinatorics, number theory, graph theory, computational geometry and theoretical com- puter science and the analysis of algorithms. He has served on numerous NAS boards and committees. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and serves as NAS Treasurer. He is a Past President of the American Math- ematical Society and currently serves as President of the Mathematical Association of America. He also served on the Panel on Quantitative Measures. PAUL HOLLAND, Ph.D., holds the Frederic M. Lord Chair in Measurement and Statistics and is acting director of the Center for Statistical Theory and Practice at the Educa- tional Testing Service (ETS). He earned a B.A. in math- ematics from the University of Michigan, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. Dr. Holland's association with ETS began in 1975 as Director of the Research Statistics Group. In 1986, he was appointed ETS's first Distinguished Research Scientist. In 1993, Dr. Holland joined the faculty at University of California-Berkeley as a professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Department of Statistics but returned in 2000 to his current position at ETS. His research interests include psychometrics, causal inference of educational interventions in non- experimental studies; multivariate analysis and the explana- tion of score scales. He also served as co-chair of the Panel on Reputational Measures and Data Presentation. EARL LEWIS, Ph.D., is Dean of the Graduate School, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs-Graduate Studies, and the Elsa Barkley Brown and Robin D.G. Kelley Collegiate Professor

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APPENDIX A of History and African-American Studies at the University of Michigan. He earned his undergraduate degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota, where he majored in history and psychology, and earned his doctorate in history at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Lewis's first academic appointment was at the University of California- Berkeley, where he taught from 1984-89. He is past Chair of the Board of the Council of Graduate Schools, a member of the GRE Board, and National Chair of the Responsive Ph.D. project. Dr. Lewis is the author or editor of five books, including In Their Own Interests: Race, Class and Power in Twentieth-Century Norfolk. His awards include the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award for the co-edited volume, To Make Our World Anew, and the Chicago Tribune's favor- ite book for 2001 recognition for Love on Trial. He also served on the Panel on Student Processes and Outcomes. JOAN F. LORDEN, Ph.D., is Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She received a B.A. from the City College of New York and a Ph.D. from Yale University. Dr. Lorden served for over eight years as Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Provost for Research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). During 2002-03, she was the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) Dean-in-Residence at the Division of Graduate Education at the National Science Foundation and chaired the CGS Board of Directors. Dr. Lorden's research focuses on brain-behavior relation- ships. At UAB she organized the doctoral program in behavioral neuroscience and was a founding member and director of the university-wide interdisciplinary Graduate Training Program in Neuroscience. As Graduate Dean, Dr. Lorden fostered programs that increased opportunities for breadth of training among graduate students and served as the program director for an interdisciplinary biological sciences training grant. Throughout her tenure as graduate dean, she was actively involved in programs designed to improve the recruitment of women and minorities into doctoral programs in science and engineering, and received several grants to advance these goals. She also served as chair of the Panel on Student Processes and Outcomes. LOUIS MAHEU, Ph.D., is Dean and Vice President of Graduate Studies of the Universite de Montreal. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees, in sociology, from the Universite de Montreal and his Ph.D. from the Universite La Sorbonne and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales of Paris. In 1970, Dr. Maheu joined the sociology faculty of the Universite de Montreal. He was a visiting scholar in many universities and countries including Great Britain, Italy, Brazil, France, Germany, China, and the United States. Dr. Maheu is author, co-author or editor of books, journals, and numerous scientific articles on social movements, social classes, scientific organizations, communities, and universi- ties. His latest work, supported by the Social Sciences and 71 Humanities Research Council and the Quebec Fund for Research and Training (FCAR), pertains to the institutional- ization of collective action and social movements within late modern institutions and societies. Dr. Maheu has served on and chaired many committees concerned with higher educa- tion, research, and graduate education related to the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies, the Quebec Council of Universities, the Quebec Association of Graduate Deans, the Canadian Foundation for the Social Sciences, the Inter- national Sociological Association, and the International Bureau of Sociology. He also has been a member of advi- sory committees and review panels of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and the Ontario Council of Graduate Studies. Dr. Maheu is currently the Chair of the Research Committee of the Board of the Centre Hospitalier de Universite de Montreal (CHUM) and is a member of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Council. Dr. Maheu also served on the Panel on Reputational Mea- sures and Data Presentation. LAWRENCE MARTIN, Ph.D., is Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Provost for Analysis and Planning at Stony Brook University. He received his Ph.D. in anthro- pology from University College London in 1983 and was a Postdoctoral Fellow in anatomy at University College London until 1985. Dr. Martin joined the Departments of Anthropology and Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook in 1985. He served as Director of Undergraduate Studies and Director of the Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sci- ences before his appointment as Dean of the Graduate School in 1993. Dr. Martin's anthropological research interests focus on species recognition in fossil primates, evolution of apes and humans, and microstructure and development of dental enamel in primates. He has analyzed the data from the 1995 research-doctorate study to assess programs at his own institution and to understand the relationship between the different measures used in that study across all programs in a number of fields. He also served on the Panel on Quan- titative Measures and the Panel on Reputational Measures and Data Presentation. MARESI NERAD, Ph.D., is Director of the National Center for Innovation and Research in Graduate Education (CIRGE), Associate Dean of the Graduate School, and Research Associate Professor for Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in the College of Education at the Uni- versity of Washington. She received a doctorate in higher education from the University of California-Berkeley in 1988. From 1988 to 2000, Dr. Nerad directed research in the Graduate Division at the University of California-Berkeley and spent the 2000 to 2001 academic year as Dean in Resi- dence at the Council of Graduate Schools. She is the author or editor of three books on women, women studies in the U.S., and on U.S. graduate education. Dr. Nerad's current research and publications focus on many aspects of graduate

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72 and postdoctoral education across major disciplines, includ- ing issues of class, race, gender, and citizenship. Dr. Nerad's most recent work (two national studies entitled Ph.D.s-10 Years Later and Ph.D.s in Art History Over a Decade Later) is directly related to this study. She also served on the Panel on Student Processes and Outcomes. FRANK SOLOMON, Ph.D., is a Professor of Biology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received his B.A. in history from Harvard University in 1964 and his Ph.D. in biochemistry in 1970 from Brandeis University. Following his doctorate he held a Postdoctoral Fellowship at Philadelphia's Institute for Cancer Research and lived in Switzerland, where he developed his interest in cell biology. Dr. Solomon joined the faculty at MIT in 1974. His research focuses on the intracellular determinants of differentiated cell morphology and the mechanisms of their expression- i.e., how cells organize their cytoplasm to produce differen- tiated morphology and motility. Dr. Solomon has a strong interest in graduate education and served as Chair of the American Society of Cell Biology Education Committee. He also served as co-chair of the Panel on Taxonomy and Interdi sciplinarity. CATHARINE R. STIMPSON, Ph.D., is Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Science, and University Profes- sor at New York University. She earned an A.B. in English, magna cum laude, from Bryn Mawr College in 1958; a B.A. with honors in 1960 and an M.A. in 1966 from Newnham College, Cambridge University; and a Ph.D. with distinction from Columbia University in 1967. Dr. Stimpson was a member of the English Department of Barnard College (1963-80), where she was the first director of the Women's Center and the founding editor of SIGNS: JOURNAL OF WOMEN IN CULTURE AND SOCIETY (1974-80) for the University of Chicago Press. In 1980, she became Professor of English at Rutgers University, then Dean of the Graduate School, Vice Provost for Graduate Education, and University Professor; she was also the first director of the Institute for Research on Women. While continuing to teach at Rutgers, Dr. Stimpson also served as Director of the MacArthur Foun- dation Fellows Program (1994-97~. She is a former chair of the New York State Humanities Council and the National Council for Research on Women as well as past president of the Modern Language Association. Dr. Stimpson also served as president of the Association of Graduate Schools in 2000-01 and is currently on the board of the Council of Graduate Schools. She holds honorary degrees from several universities and colleges, including Bates, Hamilton, and the University of Arizona. Dr. Stimpson's publications include a book, Where the Meanings Are: Feminism and Cultural Spaces, and a novel, Class Notes. She has edited seven books, has served as co-editor of the Library of America's Gertrude Stein: Writings 1903-1932 and Gertrude Stein: Writings 1932-1946, and has published over 150 mono- APPENDIX A graphs, essays, stories, and reviews. Dr. Stimpson also served as the Chair of the Panel on Quantitative Measures. PANEL ON TAXONOMY AND INTERDISCIPLINARITY Biosketches WALTER COHEN, Ph.D., Co-Chair, is currently Vice Provost and Professor of Comparative Literature at Cornell University and the former Dean of the Graduate School. He did his undergraduate work at Stanford University. After earning his Ph.D. from the University of California-Berkeley in 1980, Dr. Cohen joined the Cornell faculty. His academic specialties are Renaissance drama and literary theory. Dr. Cohen served as president of the Association of Gradu- ate Schools from 1998 tol999. Dr. Cohen is a member of the parent committee for this panel. FRANK SOLOMON, Ph.D., Co-Chair, is a Professor of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received his B.A. in history from Harvard University in 1964 and his Ph.D. in biochemistry in 1970 from Brandeis University. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Cancer Research in Philadelphia, and a research associate at Friedrich Miescher Institute in Basel, Switzerland, where he conducted research in cell biology. He joined the MIT faculty in 1974. His research focuses on the intracellular determinants of differentiated cell morphology and the mechanisms of their expression: how cells organize their cytoplasm to produce differentiated morphology and motility. Dr. Solomon has received awards for his teaching and mentoring at MIT and serves as Chair of the American Soci- ety of Cell Biology Education Committee. Dr. Solomon is a member of the parent committee for this panel. GEORGE BUGLIARELLO, Sc.D. (NAB), is President Emeritus and University Professor at Polytechnic Univer- sity, where he served as President (1973-94) and Chancellor (1994-2003~. He holds a Dott. Ing. in 1951 from the University of Padua, an M.S. in 1954 from the University of Minnesota, and a Sc.D. in 1959 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Bugliarello has a range of administra- tive experience as professor and dean of engineering at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle and as professor and chairman of the Biotechnology Program at Carnegie Mellon University. His honors and awards include: Member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAB), Founding Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engi- neering, Fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education, Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engi- neers, and Fellow of the New York Academy of Sciences. Dr. Bugliarello is Past President of Sigma Xi the Scientific Research Society, and was elected in 2003 to a four-year term as Foreign Secretary of the NAE. His research interests include biomedical engineering, fluid mechanics, computer

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APPENDIX A languages, and socio-technology. Dr. Bugliarello is a mem- ber of the parent committee for this panel. ELTON D. ABERLE, Ph.D., is Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. He received his B.S. from Kansas State Univer- sity in 1962, his M.S. from Michigan State University in 1965, and his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in food sciences in 1967. Previously, Dr. Aberle held administra- tive positions at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Insti- tute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and a faculty position at Purdue University. His research and teaching background is in muscle and adipose tissue growth, meat quality and meat processing. Dr. Aberle has taught courses in meat science, animal growth and food chemistry. He is a member of the parent committee for this panel. ROBERT F. ,IONES, Ph.D., is Vice President for Institu- tional and Faculty Studies at the Association of American Medical Colleges. His division is responsible for addressing strategic and management policy questions for academic medical centers, and the maintenance of several major AAMC databases, including the Institutional Profile System, the Faculty Salary Survey, and the Faculty Roster. Dr. Jones' s research on medical school issues focuses on institutional organization, governance, and management, faculty person- nel policies, tenure, faculty compensation, medical school financing, and the cost of medical education. He has served as a consultant to the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the National Research Council as well as numerous other organizations and institutions. LEONARD K. PETERS, Ph.D., is Vice Provost for Research at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univer- sity. Previously, he served as Department Chair, Associate Dean in the Graduate School, Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies, and Acting Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies at the University of Kentucky. His academic training and background are in chemical engi- neering with B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees all from the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Peters' research and teaching interests are in regional and global-scale atmospheric chem- istry and pollution. He has served on a number of councils and boards, including Oak Ridge Associated Universities where he is past chair of the Board of Directors, the South- eastern Universities Research Association, the Southern Technology Council. Dr. Peters was chair of the Council of Graduate Schools Board of Directors. RICHARD ATTIYEH, Ph.D., is Vice Chancellor for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies as well as Professor of Economics at the University of California, San Diego. He had also served as chair, and later dean, of the Department of Economics. Prior to his appointment at UCSD in 1967, Dr. Attiyeh served as staff economist for the President's 73 Council of Economic Advisors and as an assistant professor at Stanford and Yale. He was also past chair of the Graduate Record Examinations (ORE) Board and the Council of Graduate Schools' (CGS) Board of Directors, and past president of the Association of Graduate Schools (AGS). Dr. Attiyeh is the current chair of the Executive Committee of the AAU/AGS Project for Research on Doctoral Educa- tion and the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the California Biomedical Research Association. PANEL ON QUANTITATIVE MEASURES Biosketches CATHARINE R. STIMPSON, Ph.D., Chair, is Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Science, and University Professor at New York University. She earned an A.B. in English, magna cum laude, from Bryn Mawr College in 1958; a B.A. with honors in 1960 and an M.A. in 1966 from Newnham College, Cambridge University; and a Ph.D. with distinction from Columbia University in 1967. Formerly, Dr. Stimpson was a member of the English Department of Barnard College (1963-80), where she was the first director of the Women's Center and the founding editor of SIGNS: JOURNAL OF WOMEN IN CULTURE AND SOCIETY (1974-80) for the University of Chicago Press. In 1980, she became Professor of English at Rutgers University, then Dean of the Graduate School, Vice Provost for Graduate Education, and University Professor; she was also the first director of the Institute for Research on Women. While con- tinuing to teach at Rutgers, Dr. Stimpson also served as Director of the MacArthur Foundation Fellows Program (1994-97~. She is a former chair of the New York State Humanities Council and the National Council for Research on Women as well as past president of the Modern Language Association. Dr. Stimpson also served as president of the Association of Graduate Schools in 2000-01 and is currently on the board of the Council of Graduate Schools. She holds honorary degrees from several universities and colleges, including Bates, Hamilton, and the University of Arizona. Dr. Stimpson's publications include a book, Where the Meanings Are: Feminism and Cultural Spaces, and a novel, Class Notes. She has edited seven books, has served as co- editor of the Library of America's Gertrude Stein: Writings 1903-1932 and Gertrude Stein: Writings 1932-1946, and has published over 150 monographs, essays, stories, and reviews. She also serves on the parent committee for this panel. RONALD GRAHAM, Ph.D., is Irwin and Joan Jacobs Pro- fessor in the Department of Computer Science and Engi- neering at the University of California-San Diego and Chief Scientist at the California Institute for Telecommunication and Information Technology of the University of California- San Diego. He holds an M.A. and a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of California-Berkeley as well as a B.S.

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74 in physics from the University of Alaska at Fairbanks. Dr. Graham served as Director of Information Sciences at AT&T Bell Laboratories for more than 30 years. He has held numerous professorships in mathematics and computer science at institutions such as Rutgers University, Princeton University, Stanford University, and the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Graham's research work focuses on topics such as worst-case analysis in scheduling theory, on- line algorithms and amortized analysis in the Graham's scan in computational geometry, Ramsey Theory, and quasi- randomness. He has served on numerous NAS boards and committees. Dr. Graham is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and serves as NAS Treasurer. He is a Past President of the American Mathematical Society and currently serves as President of the Mathematical Associa- tion of America. He is a member of the parent committee for this panel. MARSHA KELMAN, M.B.A., is the Associate Vice Presi- dent and Director of the Office of Institutional Studies, and an adjunct faculty member in the Higher Education Admin- istration Program at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). She has been active in professional associations at the state, regional, and national levels, including terms as an officer in the Texas Association for Institutional Research (TAIR), the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR), and the Association for Institutional Research (AIR). She is the recipient of outstanding service awards from both TAIR and SAIR. She has served on advisory committees on matters concerning data policy for the National Postsecondary Education Cooperative, the National Center for Education Statistics, the National Science Foundation, and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. She has been the Association of American Universities (AAU) Data Exchange representative for UT Austin since 1982, and is a member and chair of the council for this group. She has chaired numerous working groups focusing on improving aspects of the data exchange and is currently a member of the consis- tency and quality taskforce and of the data warehouse devel- opment taskforce. She also served on the technical advisory group to the AAU Membership Committee in 1999-2000. LAWRENCE MARTIN, Ph.D., is Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Provost for Analysis and Planning at Stony Brook University. He received his Ph.D. in anthro- pology from University College London in 1983 and was a Postdoctoral Fellow in anatomy at University College London until 1985. Dr. Martin joined the Departments of Anthropology and Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook in 1985. He served as Director of Undergraduate Studies and Director of the Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sci- ences before his appointment as Dean of the Graduate School in 1993. Dr. Martin's anthropological research interests focus on species recognition in fossil primates, evolution of apes and humans, and microstructure and development of APPENDIX A dental enamel in primates. He has analyzed the data from the 1995 research-doctorate study to assess programs at his own institution and to understand the relationship between the different measures used in that study across all programs in a number of fields. He is a member of the parent commit- tee for this panel. JEREMIAH P. OSTRIKER, Ph.D. (NAS), is a professor of astrophysical sciences at Princeton University and Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philoso- phy at the University of Cambridge. He received his B.A. in physics and chemistry from Harvard University and his Ph.D. in astrophysics from the University of Chicago. After a postdoctoral fellowship at Cambridge University, Dr. O striker served on the faculty at Princeton University as a professor (1966-present), as department chair and director of the Princeton University Observatory (1979-1995), and as university provost (1995-2001~. During his tenure as provost, Princeton received a major grant from the Mellon Foundation to improve doctoral education in the humanities. He has received many awards and honors, including mem- bership in the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and in 2001, the U.S. National Medal of Science. He has served on several National Research Council (NRC) and National Academies committees, including the NAS Council and the NRC Governing Board. Dr. O striker also serves as the chair of the parent committee for this panel. CHARLES E. PHELPS, Ph.D., is Provost and Professor of Political Science and Economics at the University of Rochester. At the University of Rochester he was director of the Public Policy Analysis Program, Chair of the Depart- ment of Community and Preventive Medicine in the School of Medicine and Dentistry. Formerly, Dr. Phelps was at the RAND Corporation as Staff Economist, Senior Staff Econo- mist, and Director of the Program on Regulatory Policies and Institutions; he studied issues related to health policy, natural resources and environmental policy, and energy policy, and helped to found the RAND Health Insurance Experiment. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1991. Dr. Phelps served from 1990 - 1994 as a peer reviewer for grant applications to the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research of the United States government. He has been associate editor of four professional journals (currently Journal of Health Economics, and the Economics Bulletin, and previously the Journal of Policy Analysis and Manage- ment, and Journal of Risk and Uncertainty), and served 3 years as a Trustee for the Society for Medical Decision Making. He has published over 50 peer-reviewed papers and manuscripts, and a textbook, Health Economics, now in its third edition (2002~. Locally, Phelps served as a found- ing member of the Rochester Health Commission. Professor Phelps's research focuses on issues related to scholarly com- munication and digital technology.

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APPENDIX A PETER SYVERSON, M.S., is Vice President for Research and Information Services at the Council of Graduate Schools. He has been involved in the higher education policy commu- nity in Washington for the past two decades. He is respon- sible for the research activities of the Council, which include directing the national CGS/GRE Survey of Graduate Enroll- ment, the preparation of reports and articles that summarize CGS data, other research that bears on graduate education, and representing the Council on a number of advisory com- mittees involved in the conduct of national studies of U.S. higher education. He began his career in 1975 at the National Academy of Sciences where he directed the Survey of Earned Doctorates, the national survey of all new doctorate recipients. As Project Director, Peter worked to transform the annual Summary Report from a set of statistical hich- lights to a policy-research document. He led the project through the transition from a paper-based questionnaire pro- cessing system to a computer-based system. At the Council of Graduate Schools he established the Council's first office of research and working with the GRE Board, he developed a new Survey of Graduate Enrollment. That survey, now in its tenth year, has become a respected source of information on trends in graduate enrollment and application for gradu- ate study. His primary research interests involve the flow of individuals into and through graduate education and the labor market experiences of advanced-degree recipients. PANEL ON REPUTATIONAL MEASURES AND DATA PRESENTATION Biosketches JONATHAN COLE, Ph.D., Co-Chair, is the John Mitchell Mason Professor of the University and Provost at Columbia University. He joined the faculty at Columbia in 1968 and served as the Director of the Center for Social Sciences from 1979 to 1987, Vice Provost for Arts and Sciences from 1987 to 1989, and the Quetelet Professor of Social Sciences from 1989 to 2001. Dr. Cole's awards and honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, Fellow of the Center of Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and Fellow of the Ameri- can Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has published exten- sively on the growth of scientific knowledge, the social organization of peer review in science, and women in the scientific community. Dr. Cole was a member of the previ- ous committee for the study of research-doctorate programs and serves on the current parent committee for this panel. PAUL HOLLAND, Ph.D., Co-Chair, holds the Frederic M. Lord Chair in Measurement and Statistics and is acting director of the Center for Statistical Theory and Practice at the Educational Testing Service (ETS). He earned a B.A. in mathematics from the University of Michigan, and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. Dr. Holland's association with ETS began in 1975 as 75 Director of the Research Statistics Group. In 1986, he was appointed ETS's first Distinguished Research Scientist. In 1993, Dr. Holland joined the faculty at University of California-Berkeley as a professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Department of Statistics, but returned in 2000 to his current position at ETS. His research interests include psychometrics, causal inference of educational interventions in non-experimental studies; multivariate analysis and the explanation of score scales. He serves on the parent committee for this panel. JOHN BRAUMAN, Ph.D. (NAS), is the J.G. Jackson-C.J. Jackson Professor of Chemistry and Cognizant Dean for the Natural Sciences at Stanford University. He received his B.S. in 1959 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. in 1963 from the University of California- Berkeley. Dr. Brauman's research is directed toward under- standing how molecules react and the factors that determine the rates and products of chemical reactions. The principal areas of his research involve the spectroscopy, photochemistry, reaction dynamics, and reaction mechanisms of ions in the gas phase. Dr. Brauman is a member of the National Acad- emy of Sciences (NAS), a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences as well as of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and an Honorary Fellow of the California Academy of Sciences. He has received numerous honors, including an NAS Award in the Chemical Sciences and an American Chemical Society award in Pure Chemistry. In his role as Cognizant Dean he oversees the departments of: applied physics, biological sciences, history, mathematics, physics, psychology, statistics, and the Hopkins Marine Station. He also serves on the parent com- mittee for this panel. LOUIS MAHEU, Ph.D., is Dean and Vice President of Graduate Studies of the Universite de Montreal. He received his B.A. and M.A. degrees, in sociology, from the Universite de Montreal and his Ph.D. from the Universite La Sorbonne and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales of Paris. In 1970, Dr. Maheu joined the sociology faculty of the Universite de Montreal. He was a visiting scholar in many universities and countries including Great Britain, Italy, Brazil, France, Germany, China and the United States. Dr. Maheu is author, co-author or editor of books, journals and numerous scientific articles on social movements, social classes, scientific organizations, communities, and universi- ties. His latest work, supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and the Quebec Fund for Research and Training (FCAR), pertains to the institutional- ization of collective action and social movements within late modern institutions and societies. Dr. Maheu has served on and chaired many committees concerned with higher educa- tion, research and graduate education related to the Canadian Association for Graduate Studies, the Quebec Council of Universities, the Quebec Association of Graduate Deans, the

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76 Canadian Foundation for the Social Sciences, the Inter- national Sociological Association and the International Bureau of Sociology. He also has been a member of advisory committees and review panels of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and the Ontario Council of Graduate Studies. Dr. Maheu is currently the Chair of the Research Committee of the Board of the Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CHUM) and is a member of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Council. Dr. Maheu is also a member of the parent committee for this panel. LAWRENCE MARTIN, Ph.D., is Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Provost for Analysis and Planning at Stony Brook University. He received his Ph.D. in anthro- pology from University College London in 1983 and was a Postdoctoral Fellow in anatomy at University College London until 1985. Dr. Martin joined the Departments of Anthropology and Anatomical Sciences at Stony Brook in 1985. He served as Director of Undergraduate Studies and Director of the Doctoral Program in Anthropological Sci- ences before his appointment as Dean of the Graduate School in 1993. Dr. Martin's anthropological research interests focus on species recognition in fossil primates, evolution of apes and humans, and microstructure and development of dental enamel in primates. He has analyzed the data from the 1995 research-doctorate study to assess programs at his own institution and to understand the relationship between the different measures used in that study across all programs in a number of fields. He also serves on the parent commit- tee for this panel. DAVID SCHMIDLY, Ph.D., became the 13th President of Texas Tech University in 2000, after joining the university in 1996 in a dual role of Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies and Dean of the Graduate School. In 1999, his duties were expanded to include responsibility for tech- nology transfer activities. He also served on the faculty and administration of Texas A&M University for 25 years, including five years as CEO and Campus Dean of the Galveston campus and six years as head of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at College Station. He earned his B.A. and M.A. from Texas Tech and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. Dr. Schmidly is a biologist, spe- cializing in systematics, taxonomy, and natural history of mammals. He is also a specialist in natural resource man- agement and conversation. He has authored more than 100 scientific papers and seven books. Dr. Schmidly's latest book, Texas Natural History: A Century of Change, was published by the Texas Tech University Press in April 2002. DONALD RUBIN, Ph.D., is Chair and Professor of Statis- tics at Harvard University. He earned his B.A. from Princeton University in 1965 and his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1970. Dr. Rubin's research interests include APPENDIX A inference in sample surveys with nonresponse and missing data problems, and developing and applying statistical models to data in a variety of scientific disciplines. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Ameri- can Statistical Association (ASA). The ASA awarded Dr. Rubin with the S.S. Wilkes Medal as well as the Parzen Prize. He was also a Guggenheim Fellow from 1977-78. PANEL ON STUDENT PROCESSES AND OUTCOMES Biosketches JOAN F. LORDEN, Ph.D., is Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She received a B.A. from the City College of New York and a Ph.D. from Yale University. Dr. Lorden served for over eight years as Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Provost for Research at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). During 2002-03, she was the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) Dean-in-Residence at the Division of Graduate Education at the National Science Foundation and chaired the CGS Board of Directors. Dr. Lorden's research focuses on brain-behavior relation- ships. At UAB she organized the doctoral program in be- havioral neuroscience and was a founding member and director of the university-wide interdisciplinary Graduate Training Program in Neuroscience. As Graduate Dean, Dr. Lorden fostered programs that increased opportunities for breadth of training among graduate students and served as the program director for an interdisciplinary biological sciences training grant. Throughout her tenure as graduate dean, she was actively involved in programs designed to improve the recruitment of women and minorities into doctoral programs in science and engineering, and received several grants to advance these goals. She is also a member of the parent committee for this panel. ELTON D. ABERLE, Ph.D., is Dean of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. He received his B.S. from Kansas State Univer- sity in 1962, his M.S. from Michigan State University in 1965, and his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in food sciences in 1967. Previously, Dr. Aberle held administra- tive positions at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's Insti- tute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, and a faculty position at Purdue University. His research and teaching background is in muscle biology, and animal and food sci- ences. Dr. Aberle has received teaching and research awards from the American Society of Animal Sciences and the American Meat Science Association, and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society of Animal Science. Dr. Aberle is a member of the parent committee for this panel.

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APPENDIX A ADAM FAGEN is a doctoral candidate in Molecular Biology and Education at Harvard University and expects to complete his degree in 2002. He helped to direct the National Doctoral Program Survey of the National Association of Graduate-Professional Students. Mr. Fagen has held teach- ing fellow positions since 1995 and was head fellow in the principles of physics and mechanics course at Harvard. He currently serves as coordinator of the Research Experience for Teachers Program. Mr. Fagen holds an M.A. in Molecu- lar and Cellular Biology from Harvard and a B.A. (with Dis- tinction) from Swarthmore. He is a recipient of an NSF graduate fellowship. Mr. Fagen brings to this panel the knowledge he gained from work on the National Doctoral Program Survey of the National Association of Graduate- Professional Students as well as his perspective on doctoral education as a current student. GEORGE KUH, Ph.D., is Chancellor's Professor of Higher Education at Indiana University Bloomington. He directs the College Student Experiences Questionnaire Research Pro- gram and the National Survey of Student Engagement, which is sponsored by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advance- ment of Teaching and supported by the Lumina Foundation for Education and The Pew Charitable Trusts. Dr. Kuh taught at Kirkwood Community College and the University of Iowa Colleges of Education and Dentistry and was a visiting professor at Iowa State University and Portland State University. At Indiana University, he served as chairperson of the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies (1982-84), Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the School of Education (1985-88), and Associate Dean of the Faculties for the Bloomington campus (1997-2000~. Dr. Kuh has more than 200 publications and has made several hundred presentations on topics related to college student development, assessment strategies for post-secondary pro- grams and environments, and campus cultures. His recent research and scholarly activities have focused on assessing student learning and personal development, campus cultures, out-of-class experiences of undergraduates, and the institu- tional conditions that foster student learning. EARL LEWIS, Ph.D., is Dean of the Graduate School, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs-Graduate Studies, and the Elsa Barkley Brown and Robin D.G. Kelley Collegiate Professor of History and African-American Studies at the University of Michigan. He earned his undergraduate degree from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota, where he majored in history and psychology, and earned his doctorate in history at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Lewis's first academic appointment was at the University of California- Berkeley, where he taught from 1984-89. He is past Chair of the Board of the Council of Graduate Schools, a member of the GRE Board, and National Chair of the Responsive Ph.D. project. Dr. Lewis is the author or editor of five books, including In Their Own Interests: Race, Class and Power in Twentieth-Century Norfolk. His awards include the Gustavus 77 Myers Outstanding Book Award for the co-edited volume, To Make Our World Anew, and the Chicago Tribune's favor- ite book for 2001 recognition for Love on Trial. Dr. Lewis is a member of the parent committee for this panel. MARESI NERAD, Ph.D., is Director of the National Center for Innovation and Research in Graduate Education (CIRGE), Associate Dean of the Graduate School, and Research Associate Professor for Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in the College of Education at the Uni- versity of Washington. She received a doctorate in higher education from the University of California-Berkeley in 1988. From 1988 to 2000, Dr. Nerad directed research in the Graduate Division at the University of California-Berkeley and spent the 2000 to 2001 academic year as Dean in Resi- dence at the Council of Graduate Schools. She is the author or editor of three books on women, women studies in the U.S., and on U.S. graduate education. Dr. Nerad's current research and publications focus on many aspects of graduate and postdoctoral education across major disciplines, includ- ing issues of class, race, gender, and citizenship. Dr. Nerad's most recent work (two national studies entitled Ph.D.s-10 Years Later and Ph.D.s in Art History Over a Decade Later) is directly related to this study. Dr. Nerad is a mem- her of the parent committee for this panel. BRENDA RUSSELL, Ph.D., is Professor of Physiology and Biophysics, Bioengineering and Medicine and Associ- ate Vice Chancellor for Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago since 1988. She did research into muscle biology in the colleges of medicine at Duke, UCLA, and Rush Uni- versity. Dr. Russell is active in research with NIH funding and has served on study sections for NIH and the American Heart Association. She is past president of the GREAT (Graduate Research Education and Teaching) Group of the American Association of Medical Colleges. She is former editor of The American Journal of Physiology Cell Section; Cell & Tissue Research and editorial board member of many journals, including Circulation Research and The Journal of Applied Physiology. Dr. Russell has written reviews, book chapters and over 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals. SUSANNA RYAN, Ph.D., received her B.A. in literature from Sarah Lawrence College (1989) and her M.A. (1997) and Ph.D. (2002) in English Language and Literature from the University of Michigan. She has received numerous fellowships from the Rackham Graduate School at the Uni- versity of Michigan as well as awards from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Yale Center for British Art. Dr. Ryan is the currently a Woodrow Wilson Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Indiana University. Prior to her graduate career, she taught English at the Ethel Walker School, an all-girls secondary school in Connecticut. Dr. Ryan has published several articles and is currently revising her dissertation for publication (Coming to the Whip: Horsemanship and the Politics of Victorian Empathy).

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